Author Archives: Gill Kirkup

About Gill Kirkup

I have worked most of my life as an academic engaged in a combination of teaching, research and scholarship. A strong theme over the years has been a critical engagement with the gendering of technologies and the technologies of gender and identity. This blog is a place where I can reflect on all of these - sometimes in a scholarly way -but not always.

Teaching horses to talk

I am reading William Bowen’s neat (in a number of senses) new book on the economics of elearning: Higher Education in the Digital Age. It is a highly accessible book on a very opaque subject – sometimes you feel the … Continue reading

Posted in digital scholarship, elearning, the economics of things, the trouble with technology | Leave a comment

Celebration of deeds not words

The centenary of the death of Emily Wilding Davison, who was fatally injured apparently trying to attach a suffrage banner to the Kings horse running  the Darby at Epsom, seems to have captured the imagination of the press this year … Continue reading

Posted in blogademia, education policy, techno-feminist perspectives | Leave a comment

The strange education of politicians

It is well known in the UK that present Members of Parliament are drawn overwhelmingly from privileged educational backgrounds – 35% have attended independent fee paying schools, and 90% have undergraduate degrees. Since 1950 only three UK Prime-Ministers did not … Continue reading

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Margaret Thatcher – Chemist.

No UK based blog about women can ignore the death this week of Margaret Thatcher. She has been too important for us all in the last 40 years, and not in ways that we enjoyed. For someone like me who … Continue reading

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Ice Age Women

Over the weekend I visited the Ice Age Art exhibition at the British Museum. This small but wonderful exhibition has as its theme the argument that our Ice Age ancestors 40,000 years ago were intellectually modern human beings whose aesthetic … Continue reading

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International Women’s Day gets worryingly exclusive

I was lucky enough last Wednesday to be invited to a celebration of International Women’s Day, lucky enough to be served good wine and canapés of melted cheese, cooked chicken and  tiny of dainty puddings in shot glasses in one … Continue reading

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Eggs is Eggs- but what are they worth?

  Be-Ro Recipe Book 21st edition I have just taken possession of the cookery books that I learned to bake from. These are free little books given away with a brand of flour called Be-Ro. Their front cover had an … Continue reading

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Campaign to Save our LunchTimes (SOLT)

It is time to start a workplace campaign to Save Our LunchTimes. In the last century – when I began my working life-  lunch-times belonged to the workers.  We could use this time to eat, drink, lie on the grass and chat, … Continue reading

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Last Exhibition at the Old Wash House

I am at the moment very ‘exercised’ about archives. I work in an institution that does not believe that academics – or anyone else for that matter- needs space for the physical storage of such things as print books and … Continue reading

Posted in education policy, techno-feminist perspectives, the pleasures of technology | 1 Comment

Some girls get education, some get shot

  It is too easy to slip into the frame of mind that thinks the battle for educational access and equality of treatment for girls and women is won when in many countries women are more the 50% undergraduates.  They … Continue reading

Posted in Not sure what this is about, education policy, techno-feminist perspectives | 3 Comments