#FLForensic14: End of Week 8

Collage of photographs and notes on a white board

Issues of realism and ethics in witness research ©The Open University/iStockphoto.com/Rich Legg

Week 8, our final week of Forensic Psychology, the free FutureLearn course from The Open University is coming to a close, and we’ve had a brilliant last week.

Firstly don’t worry if you still need a bit more time to work, as the online content won’t be closing any time soon.

This week we brought everything we have learnt over the past few weeks together in the form of an assessment test before moving on to explore what lies ahead in the future for the Forensic Psychology field with new research that is being undertaken. This included eyewitness psychology and studies in reading minds and behaviour.

We looked at what issues of ethics and realism need to be addressed when undertaking research into witnesses and also took a look at Psychology and the field of Forensic Psychology as a whole.

Feedback:

We’re pleased to report that we’ve had fantastic feedback regarding this course, and the amount of online participation and interaction we have received during the discussions and activities has been a testament to the learners’ enjoyment.

Statement of Participation:

Statement of Participation

Statement of Participation

You may like a Statement of Participation to provide a record of your engagement and participation on the course.

This beautifully printed statement is a great way of showing evidence of your commitment to your career, or interest in the subject. Find out more.




So what now?

We hope that you have enjoyed this Forensic Psychology course and that what you have learnt has inspired you to study more about this fascinating subject.

On OpenLearn’s Taking it Further section there is a vast amount of information available for you to dig into at your own leisure to learn more. For instance, there is the Starting with Psychology course, plus the associated ebook is also available as a free download from Google play – which also has lots of other free Open University ebooks that you may be interested in.

You might also like to visit The Open University’s Psychology channel on Audioboo where you can download free audio tracks on the subject for various different devices.
For those with an iPhone, check out the Psychology section on iTunes U for more great free downloads.

Some researchers allow public access to information regarding their work, such as the Forensic Cognition Research Group Facebook page and the Centre of Forensic Interviewing. Learners on the course have also added other useful resources that they have found during their studies which you might be interested in and you can find them here.

There are of course lots more free courses available on FutureLearn, so make sure you have a look there.

If perhaps you are thinking of studying formally, there are lots of courses and qualifications involving this subject, including a BSc in Forensic Psychology available from The Open University.

You can continue to post and search on Twitter using the #FLforensic14 hashtag, and please continue to follow @OUFreeLearning for the latest news, events and info about all the free learning available at The Open University.

And finally:

Once again – a big thank you for all of your hard work during the last few weeks, and of us here at The Open University hope that you have enjoyed this Forensic Psychology course.

All the best
The Open University MOOC Team

Posted in #FLforensic14, MOOCs | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

#FLForensic14: End of Week 7

Caption of crime suspects on a white board

The case for the prosecution © The Open University/iStockphoto.com/jawphotos/RichLegg/Predrag Vuckovic/Jani Bryson/Samer Chand

We’re coming to the end of Week 7, the penultimate for Forensic Psychology, the free FutureLearn course from The Open University. We’ve had a great week with our learners piecing together the jigsaw of the crime – a real nail-biter!

The main subject this week was ‘Whodunnit?’

We started the week with looking at DI Bullet’s opinion of how the crime happened, and looked at his case for the prosecution. This then prompted a lively discussion about the defence case, and a quiz where the learners were asked to evaluate the evidence DI Bullet had gathered.

We then moved on to look at DS Sund’s opinion of what happened and also examined her prosecution case. Again, the learners were also asked to look at the case for the defence and evaluate DS Sund’s prosecution evidence.

We then studied which investigation produced the best results before discussing what our super sleuth learners had pieced together from the evidence and witness statements about what they thought had happened on the night of the crime, which prompted fascinating and extremely interesting comments and opinions in their online interactions.

The learners were then able to watch the crime take place and as to whether they were correct in their suspicions, whilst also comparing their final decision with that of the police.

But were they correct?

Next week:

In our final week of the course it’s all about conclusions. We draw on what we have learnt during the last few weeks and delve into new types of research that is being studied in psychological behaviour to do with crime and witnesses.

Other interesting stuff:

On OpenLearn’s Taking if further section this week make sure you have a look at Psychological profiling where Paul Britton, who is known as ‘The Real Cracker’ – being perhaps the UK’s leading psychological profiler, discusses how he got started on the subject.

Continue to search on Twitter using the #FLforensic14 hashtag for news and chat surrounding the course, plus follow @OUFreeLearning for the latest news, events and info about all the free learning available at The Open University.

Congratulations with what you’ve achieved so far on Forensic Psychology, and we hope that you enjoy Week 8.

The Open University MOOC Team

Posted in #FLforensic14, MOOCs | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

Episode 9: The Bottom Line

The Bottom Line - Photo: © BBC

The Bottom Line - Photo: © BBC

The final episode of The Bottom Line presented by Evan Davis is scheduled for broadcast this Thursday 24th July at 20:30 on BBC Radio 4.

The BBC and The Open University’s Faculty of Business and Law have come together to discuss the big issues with top business leaders from Britain and around the world.

Episode 9: Recalls
Broadcasting Thursday 24th July – 20:30

Faulty children’s beds, mislabelled horsemeat burgers and exploding dishwashers are among the products recalled by companies in the UK to protect the health and safety of consumers. Evan Davis and guests discuss the process for recalling defective items and find out how quickly manufacturers and distributors must act. What are the logistics of getting back hundreds of thousands of products from consumers? And what impact does a recall have on a company’s reputation? Does it reassure or unnerve customers?

Guests:

Gerard Bos, Customer Relations Manager for UK and Ireland, Ikea
Chris Dee, Chief Operating Officer, E.H Booth
Vince Shiers, Managing Director, RQA Global

This episode will also be repeated on Saturday 26th July at 17:30

Further Info

If you missed the previous episodes you can still catch up and listen to them:

This series of The Bottom Line links into a number of modules in the Business Faculty:

There is also lots of content in connection with the series and relevant subject areas on OpenLearn.  Find out more now

John Sinton - Broadcast Project Manager

John Sinton - Broadcast Project Manager

John Sinton
Broadcast Project Manager
Open Media Unit

Posted in Broadcast, Radio, The Bottom Line | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

#FLforensic14: End of Week 6

Collage of a white board with an eye and photos of suspects

Fair line ups © The Open University/iStockphoto.com/Rich Legg

Week 6 of Forensic Psychology is coming to a close and we’ve had another great week on this fantastic free FutureLearn course from The Open University.

The main subject this week has been all about visual identification.

Firstly we looked at the procedures used in identification, including identification parades and how, depending on the ways these are undertaken – such as presenting the line-up members all together or one at a time, can influence the actual accuracy of identification.

We then moved to examine why producing a verbal description of a suspect can be less accurate than forming a visual image, and how the phenomenon of unconscious transference works.

Our super sleuth learners were then given the opportunity to test their own identification skills in a series of scenarios from a crime using various procedures to analyse accuracy differences.

We examined DI Bullet and DS Sund’s investigation so far, analysing their ID parades with the suspects, which resulted in online discussions with learners and generated many interesting and insightful comments. We then looked at DI Bullet and DS Sund’s outcomes of their parades.

The question is – are they correct?

Next week:

Another exciting one – during Week 7, our penultimate week of Forensic Psychology, our main subject is ‘Whodunnit?’ We work through the detectives’ case solving analysis and their conclusions, whilst looking at both prosecution and defence cases with the learners evaluating DI Bullet and DS Sund’s prosecution evidence.

Other interesting stuff:

There was a brilliant Facebook live chat on Thursday 17th July with Dr Catriona Havard inviting questions and discussing the subject of whether children make poorer witnesses compared to adults, and what technologies have been developed by researchers in order to help obtain eyewitness evidence from children.
Lots of great questions, responses and interactions went on during this live chat – and if you didn’t get chance to join in, you can view it here.

On OpenLearn’s Taking if further section this week there is even more information on the topics covered this week, enabling you to dig into those subjects a bit further.

You can have a look at Graham Pike discussing how different lines of questioning and stress can affect ability to remember clearly in Identification evidence,or check out Changing faces showing how he contributed to the development of EFIT-V, a tool to produce images quickly of criminal suspects.

Don’t forget to have a search on Twitter using the #FLforensic14 course hashtag for news and chat, plus make sure you are following @OUFreeLearning for the latest news, events and info about all The Open University’s free learning content.

It’s all hotting up now as we get closer to solving the crime, so the very best of luck for Week 7 of Forensic Psychology.

The Open University MOOC Team

Posted in #FLforensic14, MOOCs | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Episode 8: The Bottom Line

The Bottom Line - Photo: © BBC

The Bottom Line - Photo: © BBC

The eighth of nine episodes of a new series The Bottom Line presented by Evan Davis is scheduled for broadcast this Thursday 17th July at 20:30 on BBC Radio 4.

The BBC and The Open University’s Faculty of Business and Law have come together to discuss the big issues with top business leaders from Britain and around the world.

Episode 8: Location, Disruption, Location
Broadcasting Thursday 17th July – 20:30

Civil war in Sierra Leone, political unrest in Ukraine, the Japanese tsunami and Hurricane Sandy on the east coast of the US – three guests tell Evan Davis how they led businesses through periods of unexpected and extended turmoil.

Guests :

Steve Burridge, Business Continuity Manager, Arrow Electronics
Bryan Disher, Ukraine Country Manager, PWC
Mary Hodges, Co-owner Bennimix

This episode will also be repeated on Saturday 19th July at 17:30

Further Info

If you missed the previous episodes you can still catch up and listen to them:

This series of The Bottom Line links into a number of modules in the Business Faculty:

There is also lots of content in connection with the series and relevant subject areas on OpenLearn.  Find out more now

John Sinton - Broadcast Project Manager

John Sinton - Broadcast Project Manager

John Sinton
Broadcast Project Manager
Open Media Unit

Posted in Broadcast, Radio, The Bottom Line | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

#FLforensic14: End of Week 5

Creating a face © The Open University

Creating a face © The Open University

We’re coming to the end of Week 5 of Forensic Psychology, the free course from The Open University on FutureLearn, and we’ve had another good week – with lots more information for the learners to take on board to help them solve the case, and a huge amount of online interaction again which is great, so keep it up!

The main subject this week has been all about making and recognising faces.

We started off with a discussion asking the learners to describe a face, which prompted a tremendous amount of online interaction and comments with some great guesses as to who the learners’ written descriptions of the faces belonged to.

We then looked at exactly why it is so hard to describe a face, and tips to help translate the memory into an accurate image.

We dipped into various technologies that are used for face identification, such as Efit, and the associated psychology with how these systems work, and we then moved on to study facial recall and recognition including looking at Prosopagnosia – a disorder affecting the ability to recognise faces.

Accurate face recognition – especially in criminal eyewitness cases is very important. A lot of the learners were convinced the upside-down man in Section 5.15 was our lead educator – Graham Pike, but it wasn’t!
Just goes to show how mistaken we can be when recognising faces!

The question is – have the witnesses in our case got it right?

Next week:

Lots going on again. The main subject next week will focus on visual identification. There are going to be lots of opportunities for the learners to test their identification skills this week – so we shall see what happens…!

Plus we look at the case ID parades, so all in all it’s going to be an exciting week!

Other interesting stuff:

We had a fantastic Facebook live chat session on Thursday 10th July, where questions were put to Dr Hayley Ness about the psychology of face perception, creating facial composites and exactly why there is such a problem accurately remembering faces.
There were some great questions asked and it proved to be an extremely interesting and thought provoking session and you can view the chat here.

If you missed that one – don’t worry, there’s another one on Thursday 17th July between 12.30 – 14.30 (BST). This week you can post your questions to Dr Catriona Havard and discuss the subject of whether children make poorer witnesses compared to adults, and what technologies researchers have developed to help obtain eyewitness evidence from children. Join now.

On Taking if further this week, the section on OpenLearn dedicated to this course has PhotoFit Me – a great widget for you to have a go at and create a PhotoFit, or test your memory by trying to recreate a famous face.

You might also like to have a look at Video identification: Photo credit card study where Dr Nicola Brace, a senior lecturer in Psychology talks us through the challenges eyewitnesses face when remembering unfamiliar people.

You can search on Twitter using the #FLforensic14 course hashtag for chat and updates surrounding the course, and follow our lead educator @Graham_Pike, plus you can keep up to date with all the latest news and updates for all the free content from The Open University by keeping an eye on what the @OUFreeLearning team is posting.

We hope that you are continuing to enjoy Forensic Psychology, and good luck in getting closer to solve the crime!

Keep your eyes peeled and your wits about your in readiness for Week 6.

The Open University MOOC Team

Posted in #FLforensic14, MOOCs | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Episode 7: The Bottom Line

The Bottom Line - Photo: © BBC

The Bottom Line - Photo: © BBC

The seventh of nine episodes of a new series The Bottom Line presented by Evan Davis, is scheduled for broadcast this Thursday 10th July at 20:30 on BBC Radio 4.

The BBC and The Open University’s Faculty of Business and Law have come together to discuss the big issues with top business leaders from Britain and around the world.

Episode 7: Second-Hand Trade
Broadcasting Thursday 10 July – 20:30

Making money from old phones, engines and plastic bottles is the topic for Evan Davis and guests.

How do you ensure that you collect what others throw away? How much profit is there really to be had from creating new from old? And why aren’t milk bottle tops quite the colour they once were?

Guests
Charlo Carabott, co-founder & CEO Mazuma Mobile
Matt Bulley, managing director Caterpillar Reman Europe
Chris Dow, Founder & CEO Closed Loop Recycling

This episode will also be repeated on Saturday 12th July at 17:30

Further Info

If you missed the previous episodes you can still catch up and listen to them:

This series of The Bottom Line links into a number of modules in the Business Faculty:

There is also lots of content in connection with the series and relevant subject areas on OpenLearn.  Find out more now

John Sinton - Broadcast Project Manager

John Sinton - Broadcast Project Manager

John Sinton
Broadcast Project Manager
Open Media Unit

Posted in Broadcast, Radio, The Bottom Line | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

#FLforensic14: End of Week 4

Psychology of interviewing © The Open University/iStockphoto.com/Eraxion/Rafal Olkis/Predrag Vuckovic

It’s almost the end of Week 4 of Forensic Psychology, the free FutureLearn course from The Open University, and we’ve had another fantastic week.

The theme this week has been interviewing witnesses with the aim of evaluating the information our detectives gathered from interviewing the witnesses in the case, and analysing the conclusions they reached.

We listened to DI Bullet and DS Sund’s interviews with the two witnesses, and learners were asked to make notes of anything that may be clues in solving the case.

Many of you are still debating the origins of our two detectives, and discussing which famous TV cops they most resemble. Although there seems to be some consensus that DS Lara Sund could be based on DI Sara Lund from The Killing, your ideas about DI Jake Bullet are more varied. DI Bullet’s name is actually homage to a TV cop, though a very obscure one, and the course’s lead educator did have a more famous detective in mind when creating the character. There is a clue as to the identity of this famous detective in Week 1 – though one that can only be heard and not seen….

We examined the types of questioning styles used in interviews, and discussed as to what was thought of the question styles used in DI Bullet and DS Sund’s interviews, and what conclusions could be drawn from the gathered evidence – which prompted a fantastic level of online interaction and comments from the learners.

We also studied the psychology of interviewing and context reinstatement, and how cognitive interviewing works by asking leading questions.

But did the learners think that DI Bullet and DS Sund’s observations and conclusions were correct?

Has what we’ve seen this week changed anyone’s perception and therefore their choice of suspects – or not?

Next week:

Plenty to learn again next week with the main subject theme based around making and recognising faces and discussing as to how and why it is difficult to describe faces.

How can you correctly convey the image of a face that someone has in their mind?

Other interesting stuff:

Taking if further, the section on OpenLearn dedicated to this course has further info on the topics covered during this week, including Take the photographic memory test – where you can test your ability to capture the information of a specific scene, like a snapshot, just by looking at it.

There is also an interesting article by Dr Jenny Gimpel and Dr Hugo Spiers – Memory: I can’t remember which examines how to deal with loss of memory and the different way that this affliction affects people.

Pop in to the Forensic Psychology: witness investigation Facebook community set up by learners, search on Twitter using the #FLforensic14 course hashtag for chat and updates surrounding the course, plus don’t forget that you can follow our lead educator @Graham_Pike.

The @OUFreeLearning team will also keep you regularly updated with tweets regarding the latest info, news and updates surrounding all of the free learning that The Open University has to offer.

We hope that you are all enjoying Forensic Psychology, and thank you for all of your hard work and amazing level of online interaction so far. Please keep it up!

Good luck for Week 5.
The Open University MOOC Team

Posted in #FLforensic14, MOOCs | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

#FLMyMoney14: End of Week 8

To insure or not to insure © The Open University

The last week of Managing my Money, FutureLearn’s course from The Open University is coming to a close, and we’ve had a great week to finish on.

This week saw learners exploring the array of insurance products available to protect against the financial consequences of contingent events.

We looked at whether it is sensible in some cases to do without insurance and ‘self-insure’.

The course concluded with an extended test covering the entire course.

If you haven’t finished working through the course yet, then don’t worry, as the content isn’t due to be removed any time soon. Provided you don’t select ‘leave this course’ you will still be able to access all the materials.

Final Question and Answer session:

This week also saw the third and last social event with Martin Upton and Jonquil Lowe answering a host of personal finance questions posted by learners. You can view the event here.

Managing My Money Alumni Forum:

If you have enjoyed the insightful discussions and topical debates with other learners on the course, you can join the Managing My Money Alumni Forum, where you will be able to continue to discuss your thoughts and approaches to managing your money.

Statement of Participation

Statement of Participation

As we’re now at the end of the course you may like to think about ordering a Statement of Participation.

These beautifully printed statements provide a record of your engagement on the course, and they are a great way to show evidence of your commitment to your career, or interest in the subject. Find out more.


News:

There have been plenty of related stories in the news for the week commencing 30 June:

  • The week saw the introduction of the new £15,000 annual limit for investments in (new) Individual Savings Accounts (NISAs). Earnings from these investments are tax free regardless of income level.
  • The week also saw reductions in roaming charges for those using mobile ‘phones overseas. This should help to reduce holiday expenditure.
  • The Bank of England’s Financial Policy Committee (FPC) which is responsible for monitoring the stability of the UK economy and its financial markets announced plans – albeit modest in nature – to curb riskier mortgage lending.
  • And the rise in house prices shows no signs of abating. Latest figures from Nationwide Building Society show house price inflation for the UK rising again to an annual rate of 11.8%. For London the increase in average property prices over the past year has been a staggering 26%! Average house prices, based on Nationwide’s index, are now at an all-time high and have passed their previous peak recorded in 2007.
  • The Office for National Statistics has also produced a nice infographic comparing regional house price indices before and after the financial crisis, based on its House Price Index for April 2014.

More interesting stuff:

You can continue digging into the subjects that interest you on this subject in OpenLearn’s Taking it further section which is dedicated to the topics in the course. Have a look at Over-sold, over-priced? This interesting article, by Martin Upton, looks at payment protection insurance (PPI).

You can still search on Twitter using the #FLMyMoney14 course hashtag to bring you the chat surrounding the course, as well as following @OUFreeLearning to receive updates, info and news regarding all of the free learning The Open University has to offer.

Managing My Money is scheduled to be re-run early in 2015 – so you might want to tell family members and friends about it and encourage them to sign up to the second presentation.

Additionally an OpenLearn version of Managing My Money will be available from October this year, and we will keep you posted about that.

In the meantime, please check out all of the other free courses available on FutureLearn as there are plenty on there to choose from.

Finally, Martin Upton and the Managing My Money team hope you have enjoyed the course, and that it helps you get your personal finances in order.

We would like to thank you for all your hard work and online interaction during the past eight weeks, and best wishes for the future.

All the best

The Open University MOOC Team

Posted in #FLMyMoney14, MOOCs | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Episode 6: The Bottom Line

The Bottom Line - Photo: © BBC

The Bottom Line - Photo: © BBC

The sixth of nine episodes of a new series The Bottom Line presented by Evan Davis, is scheduled for broadcast this Thursday 3rd July at 20:30 on BBC Radio 4.

The BBC and The Open University’s Faculty of Business and Law have come together to discuss the big issues with top business leaders from Britain and around the world.

Episode 6: Mental Health
Broadcasting Thursday 3 July – 20:30

Would you tell your boss you had depression? In The Bottom Line this week, Evan Davis hears from three successful business people who talk openly about what it’s like to experience severe mental illness whilst running their companies. They’ll explain the risks and rewards of going public about mental ill health problems: the reaction from investors and the impact on staff. And we’ll hear why being open about mental illness can lead to a happier, healthier workplace.

Guests:

Lord Stevenson of Coddenham, entrepreneur and former Chairman of HBOS;
Andrea Woodside, Founder, Minding Work Limited;
and Chris Mowat, Managing Director, The Clean Space

This episode will also be repeated on Saturday 5th July at 17:30

Further Info

If you missed the previous episodes you can still catch up and listen to them:

This series of The Bottom Line links into a number of modules in the Business Faculty:

There is also lots of content in connection with the series and relevant subject areas on OpenLearn.  Find out more now

John Sinton - Broadcast Project Manager

John Sinton - Broadcast Project Manager

John Sinton
Broadcast Project Manager
Open Media Unit

Posted in Broadcast, Radio, The Bottom Line | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment