Category Archives: Conferences

Creating pilot projects with impact: Jonathan Drori

Really useful presentation by Jonathan Drori at ALT-C about how to add impact to a pilot project. Questions to ask about your project include: Why is this project different from all other projects? Will more people learn better? Will this … Continue reading

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Time runs fast in virtual worlds

While researching heritage in Second Life, I noted that time speeds up in virtual worlds. Events that took place only months ago are referred to as part of the world’s history. When your world is only five years old, anything … Continue reading

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Handheld Learning 2008 and Nintendo DS

At HHL2007, I joined twitter. This was good fun and definitely a little ahead of the game. I’m now signed up for HHL2008 in October and this year they’re sending all delegates who register before 31st July a free Nintendo DS. … Continue reading

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Twitter – love it or hate it

I’m almost reluctant to wade in with yet another post about twitter. It seems to quite polarise views. Will triggered qute an interesting dialogue when he highlighted some disadvantages of twitter in his blog and suggested that it might be … Continue reading

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Prof Mizuko Ito, University of Southern California, USA; and Keio University, Japan.

Looking at tracking and observing practices happening at distributed sites and personal settings of engagements. No longer possible to assume a fixed setting as a primary or sole context for knowledge.   Using anthropoligical, ethnographic methods.   Mobile behaviours are … Continue reading

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David Livingston’s talk at Research Methods for Informal Learning

David Livingston’s talk in the afternoon   Broadcast via video.   Proposing that enabling approaches are more fruitful than evaluative apporaches for researching informal learning.   He’s referring us to the website www.learningwork.ca for details of californian studies   Starts … Continue reading

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Practice Strand – Susan Johnson – Mobile phone technology use in school science enquire indoors and out of doors

Talking about the PlaSciGardens project – one small bit relating to the Kew Gardens study. Relating to how children collect data out of doors. 9 – 10 year olds organised in small grous.  The goal was to aid engagement and … Continue reading

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Practice Strand – Chris Dearnley – Mobile enabled disabled students – widening access to research participation

Interested in how mobile devices can be used to assiste learning and assessment in practice among disabled students.  What works well for disabled students? Challenges presented by mobile devices for disabled students?   Looking at methods. Going to give students … Continue reading

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Practice Strand – Jon Trinder – Have you got your PDA with you? Accusations and denials

Talking about his 2005 project with Palm PDAs Using a logging system to give accurate usage information. In Jon’s opinion, student’s devices not really used that much. Data logging on PDAs was automatic, however the transfer of logs relied on the … Continue reading

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Practice Strand – Tony Lelliott on Using Personal Meaning Mapping

to gather data on school visits to science centres. Anthony Lelliott from Johannesburg. Looking at Visitor learning by doing a variation on the pre-test post-test method. RQs – How much do they learn What are their individual experiences How do … Continue reading

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