Digital Humanities seminars, 19 & 26 November

Digital Humanities at The Open University is happy to announce the following two events in its Digital Humanities in Practice series:

 Exploratory Trend and Search Detection

Speaker: Prof. Dr. Gerhard Heyer, Institut für Informatik/Computer Science Department, Universität Leipzig

Date: 19th November 2014 at 11:30am (11:30 GMT)

Venue: Knowledge Media Institute, Berrill Building, The Open University, Milton Keynes, United Kingdom, MK7 6AA

The talk will present the notion of exploratory search as a means to go beyond “lookup”, like learning or investigating (Marchionini 2006), and sketch its usefulness in new applications such as Digital Humanities. In detail, Prof. Dr. Gerhard Heyer will present a new approach to the analysis of topics and their dynamics over time. Given a large amount of time stamped textual data, we can identify “hotly discussed” concepts by analysing the rate a term changes context. Adopting the notion of volatility from econometrics, context volatility can be used to detect “weak signals” or semantic change independent from pure counts of frequency.

For more information about the event and to follow the podcast live on 19 November, please go to http://stadium.open.ac.uk/2457

 

Valuing Electronic Music

Date: 26 November 2014

Time: 1.00pm-3.00pm (note later start time)

Venue: Arts Music Studio, The Open University Walton Hall, Milton Keynes (directions)

 

Speakers: Daniel Allington (Department of Applied Linguistics and English Language, Open University);

Byron Dueck (Department of Music, Open University);

Anna Jordanous (School of Computing, University of Kent)

This seminar reports on an AHRC-funded research project combining ethnographic observation and interviewing in London’s electronic music scene with automated collection of quantitative data from the popular SoundCloud website. The presentation will reflect not only upon the findings of the research, which have implications for our understanding of cultural value more generally, but also upon the challenges and rewards of combining situated qualitative research with quantitative analysis of large datasets gathered online.

A sandwich lunch will be served. Please register for the Valuing Electronic Music seminar by emailing Matthew Pemberton (matthew.pemberton@open.ac.uk) by 21 November 2014.

Digital Humanities seminar, 17 June: Text Mining for Historical and Literary Research

Information and cursor logo, by Heather Scott

Image by Heather Scott. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

The Digital Humanities at The Open University network is pleased to present the next event in the Digital Humanities in Practice series:

Text mining for historical and literary research: the Trading Consequences and Palimpsest projects

Date: 17 June 2014

Time: 2.30pm-4.30pm (note later start time)

Venue: Arts Music Studio, The Open University Walton Hall, Milton Keynes (directions)

Speaker: Dr Beatrice Alex (Informatics, University of Edinburgh)

By collaborating together, computer scientists, historians and literary scholars are developing text mining and visualisation techniques to interrogate, explore and understand digitised historical and literary texts on an entirely new scale.

In this seminar, Dr Beatrice Alex will discuss the challenges she has encountered while building a text mining tool adapted for two interdisciplinary projects in the Humanities: Trading Consequences (http://tradingconsequences.blogs.edina.ac.uk/), which focuses on commodity trading in the nineteenth century, and Palimpsest (http://palimpsest.blogs.edina.ac.uk/), which is studying fictional and remembered space in literary Edinburgh.

Tea and coffee will be served. Please register for the event by emailing Heather Scott (heather.scott@open.ac.uk) by 13 June.

Digital Humanities Seminar, 3 April: BL Labs and Listening Experience Database

Information and cursor logo, by Heather Scott

Image by Heather Scott. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

The Digital Humanities Thematic Research Network is pleased to present an update to the next event in the Digital Humanities in Practice series.

The British Library Labs

Presenters: Mahendra Mahey (BL Labs Project Manager) and Ben O’Steen (Technical Lead, BL Labs)

Date: 3 April 2014

Time: 11.00am-12.00pm

Location: Arts Music Studio, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes (directions)

Hundreds of thousands of digital items and objects are being created and collected by the British Library for researchers to use: digitised manuscripts, sheet music, newspapers, maps, archived websites, radio, performances, TV news broadcasts, and artworks, as well as the more expected items like scanned versions of books.

This wonderful cacophony of content is having a significant effect on how the British Library supports the research needs of its users. Will people discover new information when they are no longer restricted to viewing a single page from a single book at a time? How can the Library build systems that provide a coherent route across its content, regardless to whether it is a televised news report or a unique signatures drawn in the margins of a map? How can we use crowd-sourced information, computer vision and machine-learning techniques to provide people with better tools to better judge and interpret the context of illustration or work? How can we exploit animations and interactive infographics to better convey the information bound in our holdings? This is the research space that British Library Labs explores. The seminar will also present the current BL Labs competition, which closes on the 22 April 2014.

The Listening Experience Database

Presenters: Professor David Rowland and Dr Helen Barlow (The Open University) and Simon Brown (The Royal College of Music)

Date: 3 April 2014

Time: 12.30-2.00pm

Location: Arts Music Studio, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes (directions)

The Listening Experience Database (LED) project is an AHRC-funded collaboration between the Open University and the Royal College of Music, the main purpose of which is to design and develop a database which will bring together a mass of data about people’s experiences of listening to music of all kinds, in any historical period and any culture. The database is freely searchable by the general public and uses crowdsourcing as one of the ways in which data is collected. This session will give an overview of the project, focusing in particular on the architecture and development of the database, and some of the challenges of developing an effective crowdsourcing strategy.

This part of the event will be recorded and made available on OU Podcasts.

A sandwich lunch will be provided. To book a place, please email Heather Scott (heather.scott@open.ac.uk) by 31 March 2014.

For more information on Digital Humanities at The Open University, please go to the Digital Humanities website http://www.open.ac.uk/arts/research/digital-humanities/

Digital Humanities Seminar, 25 February 2014. Text Analysis: The Digital Dimension

Information and cursor logo, by Heather Scott

Image by Heather Scott. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

The Digital Humanities Thematic Research Network is pleased to present the next event in the Digital Humanities in Practice series.

Text analysis: the digital dimension. What can computers, which have no understanding of words or concepts, contribute to the analysis of texts?

Speaker: David King (Computing, The Open University)

Date: 25 February 2014

Time: 12.00-2.00

Location: Arts Music Studio, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes (directions)

Abstract: Illustrated with many examples, this talk introduces the computer-based tools and techniques that humanities researchers can call on to support their research by turning text into data for analysis. This added dimension can lead to the ability to answer old questions more easily, and open up new avenues of investigation. However, these tools and techniques are not without their problems and limitations, which this talk will also consider.

About the speaker: David’s first degree, taken several decades ago, is in International History and Politics, while his PhD is in Computing. He hopes the talk will help you think about using computers in your research without having to follow the same career path.

A sandwich lunch will be provided. To book a place, please email Heather Scottheather.scott@open.ac.uk by 20 February 2014.

Digital Humanities Seminar, 28 November 2013: Who Killed Christabel?

Information and cursor logo, by Heather Scott

Image by Heather Scott. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

The Digital Humanities Thematic Research Network is pleased to present the next event in the Digital Humanities in Practice series.

Who Killed Christabel? A thrilling tale of reviewing, anonymity and computational stylometry

Francesca Benatti (Digital Humanities, The Open University)

Date: 28 November 2013

Time: 12.00-2.00

Location: Arts Music Studio, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes (directions)

In the early nineteenth century, public debate on literature and politics was dominated by the great quarterly reviews, the Edinburgh and the Quarterly. While the authorship of most of their anonymous articles has never been a mystery, some cases have been puzzling scholars for almost two centuries, none more so than the scathing review of Coleridge’s Christabel published in the Edinburgh in 1816. Scholars have focused on William Hazlitt and Thomas Moore as the most likely authors, but there is so far no firm consensus on its attribution.

This talk presents the results of the investigation undertaken by the editors of the Thomas Moore Archive, based a new evaluation of existing contextual evidence and on the stylometric analysis of the literary reviews published in the Edinburgh, using the methods and tools developed by John Burrows and implemented by Maciej Eder and Jan Rybicki’s suite of tools for the R statistical software.

A sandwich lunch will be served to registered participants. Please email Heather Scott heather.scott@open.ac.uk by 25 November to reserve a place.