Can Digital Humanities become a research area in its own right?

by Lorna Hardwick

Can Digital Humanities become a research area in its own right? This is the foremost question in my mind. It’s clear from the recent series of seminars and surveys organised under the banner of the Arts Faculty’s Digital Humanities research theme that there is a rich collection of digital practices that can support research. These range from searchable databases to tools for academic networking and are all likely to become even more influential as we move into an era in which funding for exchange visits and conferences is likely to be even harder to come by.

Yet such things don’t equate to a coherent research area.

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Playing without guilt

I’ve just been uploading to the wiki* the outputs of the recent Digital Research Communities workshop held at the Open University. It’s given me chance to have another think about some of the issues which were raised there.

One of the suggested ‘goals’ which seemed to really catch people’s imagination was to make time to ‘play’ with the new social media tools so people could investigate how they could help them with their work.

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