New DH_OU Seminar Videos Available

DH_Montage by Heather Scott. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

Video podcasts are now available for our most recent Digital Humanities in Practice seminars.

Dr Ann Hewings and Dr Daniel Allington’s seminar  “Corpus Linguistics as Distant Reading?”, recorded on 04 July 2013, is available here:  http://podcast.open.ac.uk/pod/2560

Dr Tim Hutchings’ seminar “CyberBibles: Evangelical Christianity and the Digital Bible”, recorded on 19 September 2013, is available here:  http://podcast.open.ac.uk/pod/2641

Image: DH Montage by Heather Scott. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

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Digital Humanities Seminar: Commodity Histories, 24 October 2013

Information and cursor logo, by Heather Scott

Image by Heather Scott. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

The Digital Humanities Thematic Research Network is pleased to present the next event in the Digital Humanities in Practice series.

Commodity Histories

Sandip Hazareesingh (History, The Open University) and Matthew Paskins (UCL)

Date: 24 October 2013

Time: 12.00-2.00

Location: Arts Music Studio, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes (directions)

Commodity Histories is a public forum for research postings, news and information about the history of commodities, with a particular focus on locations in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and Latin America. The website was launched in September 2013 with funding from the AHRC and the British Academy. Principal Investigator Sandip Hazareesingh and Community Manager Matthew Paskins will outline the innovative features of this digital project from the perspectives both of the discipline of history and of its community-building objectives, which are designed to ‘authorise’ and bring to public attention a range of voices, experiences and sources that have so far remained marginal to the concerns of Digital Humanities

A sandwich lunch will be served to registered participants. Please email Heather Scott heather.scott@open.ac.uk by 21 October to reserve a place.

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Open Arts Journal official launch, Open University London, 21 October 2013

Next Monday 21 October, The Open University in London will host the official launch of the Summer 2013 issue of the Open Arts Journal, a new open access publication from The Open University Department of Art History. The first issue, entitled “Cosmopolitanism as Critical and Creative Practice“, will be followed in Winter 2013 by issue two, “Pavillions.” The event coincides with the start of the International Open Access week.

The journal’s sub-title is ‘open and diverse arts scholarship’. As editor-in-chief Leon Wainwright explains:

The Open Arts Journal addresses the demand for a rigorously compiled, peer-reviewed platform for arts scholarship open to diverse participants. Our dissemination is global, spanning multiple communities including practitioners of art, architecture and design, curators and arts policy-makers, and researchers in the arts and heritage sectors.

The Open Arts Journal also confronts the current developments in open access publishing in the arts and humanities.

The Open Arts Journal makes an alternative, distinctive offer, embracing an ethos of ‘openness’ toward those who may benefit from genuine ‘open access’ scholarly activity online. It is published twice a year, and each issue addresses a key theme or critical debate. Submissions undergo thorough, in-depth peer review in consultation with an esteemed international editorial board.

The launch event is free but registration is required. Please go to https://openartsjournal-launch.eventbrite.com to register and for more information. A map of The Open University London centre is available here: http://www3.open.ac.uk/contact/maps.aspx?contactid=1

The Open Arts Journal warmly welcomes responses and proposals for future  issues at: Arts-open-arts-journal@open.ac.uk. To join the Open Arts Journal mailing list, visit www.jiscmail.ac.uk/OPENARTSJOURNAL

via Open Arts Journal | Open, diverse art scholarship.

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Daniel Allington’s seminar at CeRch, King’s College London, 1 October 2013

Network analytic approaches to the production and propagation of literary and artistic value

Daniel Allington, The Open University

Daniel Allington, Centre for Language and Communication, Faculty of Education and Language Studies, The Open University, will present the first seminar in this year’s Centre for e-Research Seminar Series, King’s College London, on 1 October 2013 at 6.15pm.

Daniel will be discussing  his approach to study of the production and propagation of literary and artistic value, which emerges from Bourdieu’s sociology but employs social network analysis: two paradigms that are often assumed to be in opposition. Daniel will illustrate his methodological and theoretical reflections with details from his empirical research on interactive fiction and other ongoing projects where he examines the relationships between cultural producers (such  as early 20th century authors, contemporary visual artists and electronic musicians).

The seminar is open to all and free to attend.

For a full abstract, see Kings College London – Network analytic approaches to the production and propagation of literary and artistic value.

For more information on Daniel and his work, please see his website at http://www.danielallington.net.

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DH_OU Seminar, 19 September 2013: CyberBibles

Information and cursor logo, by Heather Scott

Image by Heather Scott. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

The Digital Humanities Thematic Research Network is pleased to present the next event in the Digital Humanities in Practice series.

CyberBibles

Tim Hutchings, Durham University

19 September 2013, 12.00-2.00
Arts Music Studio, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes (directions)

In recent years, one of the most dramatic areas of growth in the e-reading marketplace has been the Christian Bible, with more than 100 million copies installed. These digital Bibles are designed and promoted as tools for personal and societal transformation, using techniques of persuasive computing to encourage changes in reading behaviour. This paper will analyse the ways in which these new Bibles perpetuate and destabilize traditional Christian theologies, and consider some of the responses I have observed among users.

A sandwich lunch will be served to registered participants. Please email Heather Scott heather.scott@open.ac.uk by 16 September to book a place.

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