Digital Humanities Seminar, 25 February 2014. Text Analysis: The Digital Dimension

Information and cursor logo, by Heather Scott

Image by Heather Scott. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

The Digital Humanities Thematic Research Network is pleased to present the next event in the Digital Humanities in Practice series.

Text analysis: the digital dimension. What can computers, which have no understanding of words or concepts, contribute to the analysis of texts?

Speaker: David King (Computing, The Open University)

Date: 25 February 2014

Time: 12.00-2.00

Location: Arts Music Studio, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes (directions)

Abstract: Illustrated with many examples, this talk introduces the computer-based tools and techniques that humanities researchers can call on to support their research by turning text into data for analysis. This added dimension can lead to the ability to answer old questions more easily, and open up new avenues of investigation. However, these tools and techniques are not without their problems and limitations, which this talk will also consider.

About the speaker: David’s first degree, taken several decades ago, is in International History and Politics, while his PhD is in Computing. He hopes the talk will help you think about using computers in your research without having to follow the same career path.

A sandwich lunch will be provided. To book a place, please email Heather Scottheather.scott@open.ac.uk by 20 February 2014.

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Open Arts Journal Flyer and Videos Now Available

Open Arts Journal banner.  Image by Maya Freelon Asante. Courtesy of the artist and Morton Fine Art, Washington, DC. www.mayafreelon.com

Open Arts Journal. Image by Maya Freelon Asante. Courtesy of the artist and Morton Fine Art, Washington, DC. www.mayafreelon.com

PAVILIONS | Issue 2, Winter 2013

This second issue of the Open Arts Journal, to be published in Winter 2013,  pulls together a number of exploratory texts – some academic, some more creative in style – on the understudied subject of pavilions.

Responding to the question ‘What is a pavilion?’, this issue proposes that the pavilion (as an ornamental garden structure, an exposition venue, or something more conceptual like a curated project or book) should no longer be neglected as a minor or inconsequential form of architecture. Although its origins may be in the modest tents of travellers, the pavilion as a structure has nonetheless been mobilized in strategies of world-making and unmaking, and this issue explores these creative manoeuvres.

To learn more about Issue 2 of the Open Arts Journal, visit their blog or download the flyer for Issue 2 “Pavillions” (PDF, 325KB)

The Open Arts Journal was officially launched on 21 October 2013 at The Open University in London. To watch Prof Marsha Meskimmon’s  presentation on ‘The Precarious Ecologies of Cosmopolitanism’, go to the video podcast held on the Open Arts Archive at  http://www.openartsarchive.org/oaa/content/open-arts-journal-launch-event-1. To follow the panel discussion with Professor Berthold Schoene and Dr Ellie Byrne (guest editors Issue 1), and Open Arts Journal editor-in-chief Dr Leon Wainwright, visit the Open Arts Archive at  http://www.openartsarchive.org/oaa/content/open-arts-journal-launch-event-0

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Digital Humanities Seminar, 28 November 2013: Who Killed Christabel?

Information and cursor logo, by Heather Scott

Image by Heather Scott. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

The Digital Humanities Thematic Research Network is pleased to present the next event in the Digital Humanities in Practice series.

Who Killed Christabel? A thrilling tale of reviewing, anonymity and computational stylometry

Francesca Benatti (Digital Humanities, The Open University)

Date: 28 November 2013

Time: 12.00-2.00

Location: Arts Music Studio, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes (directions)

In the early nineteenth century, public debate on literature and politics was dominated by the great quarterly reviews, the Edinburgh and the Quarterly. While the authorship of most of their anonymous articles has never been a mystery, some cases have been puzzling scholars for almost two centuries, none more so than the scathing review of Coleridge’s Christabel published in the Edinburgh in 1816. Scholars have focused on William Hazlitt and Thomas Moore as the most likely authors, but there is so far no firm consensus on its attribution.

This talk presents the results of the investigation undertaken by the editors of the Thomas Moore Archive, based a new evaluation of existing contextual evidence and on the stylometric analysis of the literary reviews published in the Edinburgh, using the methods and tools developed by John Burrows and implemented by Maciej Eder and Jan Rybicki’s suite of tools for the R statistical software.

A sandwich lunch will be served to registered participants. Please email Heather Scott heather.scott@open.ac.uk by 25 November to reserve a place.

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New DH_OU Seminar Videos Available

DH_Montage by Heather Scott. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

Video podcasts are now available for our most recent Digital Humanities in Practice seminars.

Dr Ann Hewings and Dr Daniel Allington’s seminar  “Corpus Linguistics as Distant Reading?”, recorded on 04 July 2013, is available here:  http://podcast.open.ac.uk/pod/2560

Dr Tim Hutchings’ seminar “CyberBibles: Evangelical Christianity and the Digital Bible”, recorded on 19 September 2013, is available here:  http://podcast.open.ac.uk/pod/2641

Image: DH Montage by Heather Scott. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

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Digital Humanities Seminar: Commodity Histories, 24 October 2013

Information and cursor logo, by Heather Scott

Image by Heather Scott. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

The Digital Humanities Thematic Research Network is pleased to present the next event in the Digital Humanities in Practice series.

Commodity Histories

Sandip Hazareesingh (History, The Open University) and Matthew Paskins (UCL)

Date: 24 October 2013

Time: 12.00-2.00

Location: Arts Music Studio, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes (directions)

Commodity Histories is a public forum for research postings, news and information about the history of commodities, with a particular focus on locations in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and Latin America. The website was launched in September 2013 with funding from the AHRC and the British Academy. Principal Investigator Sandip Hazareesingh and Community Manager Matthew Paskins will outline the innovative features of this digital project from the perspectives both of the discipline of history and of its community-building objectives, which are designed to ‘authorise’ and bring to public attention a range of voices, experiences and sources that have so far remained marginal to the concerns of Digital Humanities

A sandwich lunch will be served to registered participants. Please email Heather Scott heather.scott@open.ac.uk by 21 October to reserve a place.

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