How cross-sector collaboration can be a catalyst for social change: what’s the difference between action and activity?

Civil society leaders representing member organisations under the umbrella of Citizens UK meet the Prime Minister, David Cameron, at No.10 Downing Street, in April 2015 to discuss a range of hot issues, living wage and minimum wage, social care and engagement with faith groups on such matters as countering terrorism and violent extremism

Civil society leaders representing member organisations under the umbrella of Citizens UK meet the Prime Minister, David Cameron, at No.10 Downing Street, in April 2015 to discuss a range of hot issues, living wage and minimum wage, social care and engagement with faith groups on such matters as countering terrorism and violent extremism

Action is purposeful activity. I’ve read that if a cockroach’s head is decapitated, it’s possible the body continues to move for as long as a week. Does it make sense to speak of the actions of the said cockroach, or just its activity?

Through my involvement in the Annual Review of Social Partnerships – the focus of research on collaboration and interaction between civil society, business and government – I am editing for the second year running the Praxis section, where practitioners reflect on practice and draw learning from it that can shared with a growing global community of academics and practitioners in this field.

If like me you want to make 2016 a year of real, tough-minded collaboration across business, civil society and government, this is an inspiring publication, rich in insight and information. To adapt a quote from Marx: We have nothing to lose but our silos. We have so much to gain if we act more in concert, and make working with and through others as important as focusing on what we ourselves need to get done.

The combination of independence and mutual dependence is a powerful combination for social, political and economic change.
In my view, we cannot achieve outer change without inner change. Taking responsibility is critical. We need to lead by example if collaborative leadership is to be successful.

The 10th Annual Review of Social Partnerships (2015) was released in September to much acclaim. We are now planning the 2016 edition – a time to build on more than ten years of collaborative endeavours to bring together, share and learn from cross-sector partnership practice and theory.

Based on contributions in over 130 pages, this is what you can find in the 2015 edition of

Civil society leaders meet David Cameron for round-table discussion on matters ranging from adoption of Living Wage to improving social care provision and engagement with faith groups

Civil society leaders meet David Cameron for round-table discussion on matters ranging from adoption of Living Wage to improving social care provision and engagement with faith groups

ARSP:

* State of the art review of 100+ new publications on cross-sector partnerships

* New tools for designing highly interactive cross-sector collaboration teaching

* Academic and practitioner insights through interviews and original contributions

* News from the cross-sector collaboration community

* Celebratory section on ARSP volunteering, readership and cross-sector inspiration

To download the whole issue from our new publisher Greenleaf, link to www.greenleaf-publishing.com/arsp (registration is quick and for free).

Link to ARSP home page: http://www.greenleaf-publishing.com/page221/Journals/ArspHome

Link to Editorial Board: http://www.greenleaf-publishing.com/page227/Journals/Editorial

Thanks to our new partnership with Greenleaf, we have increased the number of direct recipients of the ARSP to 50,000 (up from 30,000). Greenleaf has also placed the ARSP on Ingenta Connect – reaching globally 1.4 million individual users.

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