Why Art History Matters: showcase on Open Arts Journal

The Open Arts Journal addresses the demand for a rigorously compiled, peer-reviewed platform for arts scholarship that is open to diverse participants.

If you don’t know already, one of the open access resources coming out of the department of Art History at the Open University is the Open Arts Journal.

Published by The Open University, the Open Arts Journalwww.openartsjournal.org – addresses the demand for a rigorously compiled, peer-reviewed platform for arts scholarship that is open to diverse participants. Its dissemination is global, spanning multiple communities including practitioners of art, architecture and design, curators and arts policy-makers, and researchers in the arts and heritage sectors.

With a broad base of interests the Open Arts Journal emphasises innovation, in both content and medium and by virtue of a bespoke digital design. Its contributors encompass a wide range of scholars, from academics to critics and practitioners, with original visual essays and polemics; reflections on art from curators and artists; and the fruits of theoretical, historical or longitudinal research.

Each edition tackles a key theme, issue or critical debate.

Past themed issues include:

Issue 1 Cosmopolitanism as Creative and Critical Practice

Issue 2 Pavilions

Issue 3 Disturbing Pasts: Memories, Controversies and Creativity*

Issue 4 Touch Me, Touch Me Not: Senses, Faith and Performativity in Early Modernity

Issue 5 Sustainable Art Communities: Creativity and Policy in the Transnational Caribbean*

Issue 6 Baroque Naples: Place and Displacement

Issue 7 Between Sensuous and Making-Sense-Of (forthcoming winter 2018)

*Extended and re-published as two major book anthologies from Manchester University Press: http://www.manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/9781526115454/

http://www.manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/9781526117281/

Each issue is downloadable free and without subscription or registration.

Submissions undergo thorough peer review in consultation with an esteemed international editorial board. We warmly welcome responses and proposals for future such issues at: FASS-Open-Arts-Journal@open.ac.uk

To join the Open Arts Journal distribution list, visit www.jiscmail.ac.uk/OPENARTSJOURNAL

Editor in Chief: Leon Wainwright

Managing Editor: Alice E. Sanger

Deputy Editor: Tilo Reifenstein

Mask of Madness, c. 1550–80. Sacro Bosco, Bomarzo. (Photo by Thalia Allington-Wood)

 The Art History department has always been dedicated to providing open access Art History materials. For an overview of what we do, check out our previous blog on widening participation and open access.

Why does Art History Matter To You?

Along with the films we’ve done of curators in museums and academics from the Art History department at the Open University, we also put a call out to the general public on #whyarthistorymatters.

We’ve had films from interior designers, artists, as well as these A-level students:

You can see more of these films over on our YouTube channel.

Why not record your own & tag us on social media?:

#whyarthistorymatters #openartsobjects #ouarthistory #OUrArtHistory #wahm

Open Arts Objects 

Facebook: Open Arts Objects

Instagram: openartsobjects

twitter: @openartsarchive

Why Art History Matters

The importance of Art History as a discipline that continuously asks new questions about society, challenges preconceptions around race and gender, and offers a window into the past, cannot be taken lightly. Indeed, it might be a complex subject, but shouldn’t that be the reason to study it? To provide our future generations with new ways of seeing the world?

Next week and beyond, the Art History department at the Open University will be showcasing some of the ways that Art History matters. You’ll have the opportunity to hear a range of voices from alumni, OU academics, & current students to artists, A-level students, and other practitioners. This will come in a variety of forms, from a social media campaign on twitter & Instagram to blogs here on Open Arts Extra.

We’d love to hear from you, so if you have a story to tell that you’d like shared, tag us on social media, and if you’d like to write a blog for us, get in touch with us: openartsobjects@open.ac.uk! Have our open access resources changed the way you think about the world around you? Have our modules been life changing? or have our films provided you new insight into works of art you thought you knew well? If you’re a teacher, have our free teaching resources helped you in your teaching? Whatever it is, we’d like to hear from you!

So a little more about the #whyarthistorymatters campaign:

In autumn 2016, when Art History was removed from the A-level curriculum (temporarily), a campaign was started, utilising the hashtag #whyarthistorymatters. The responses were overwhelming from key academics in the field such as Craig Clunas (Oxford) and Griselda Pollock (Leeds) to Turner Prize artists such as Cornelia Parker and Jeremy Deller, as well as individuals who had taken the subject at A-level or at university and whose lives had been profoundly changed by Art History. While Pearson rose to the task of providing the new qualification with a new global spec and the Association For Art History (formerly AAH) has long been committed to promoting the value of art history and visual culture, we feel that Art History still needs to be recognised as an essential skill in today’s world. The importance of Art History as a discipline that continuously asks new questions about society, challenges preconceptions around race and gender, and offers a window into the past, cannot be taken lightly. Indeed, it might be a complex subject, but shouldn’t that be the reason to study it? To provide our future generations with new ways of seeing the world?

Open Arts Objects, is a project that provides free open access films and teaching materials to support the teaching of Art History at A-level as well as to teach the general public on how to look closely at a wide range of works of art

It is why we have been working hard on Open Arts Objects, a project that provides free open access films and teaching materials to support the teaching of Art History at A-level as well as to teach the general public on how to look closely at a wide range of works of art. This project is part of the current strategy within the Open University to develop a series of public facing initiatives that can help inspire wider and diverse constituencies to enjoy and understand art works and visual culture.

To increase awareness and to widen participation in the discipline, we’ve been creating a series of short films on why art history matters. We’ve asked a wide range of people including academics, curators, teachers, educators, artists, students, and alumni to consider in a single sentence why art history is important to them. We hope that this will also encourage the public to start making their own short films and sharing them on social media (and please do tag us so we can share too!)

Stay tuned for more and follow us on social media!

Why does it matter to you?

The Open Arts Objects team, The Open University

#whyarthistorymatters #openartsobjects #ouarthistory #OUrArtHistory #wahm

Open Arts Objects 

Facebook: Open Arts Objects

Instagram: openartsobjects

twitter: @openartsarchive

 

{why art history matters at the OU}

 

In August, we’ll be showcasing some of the reasons why art history matters to us, here at the OU. Featuring blogposts & films from current students, alumni, curators, academics, artists, and more, it’ll give us a chance to showcase to the world all the reasons why art history matters, and why it’s still important in today’s world.

So stay tuned!

OAJ Issue 5: Sustainable art communities: creativity and policy in the transnational Caribbean

OAJ_banner_for_issue5

We are delighted to announce the publication of Issue 5 of the Open Arts Journal.

This themed issue of the Open Arts Journal, ‘Sustainable Art Communities: Creativity and Policy in the Transnational Caribbean’, brings together academics, artists, curators and policymakers from various countries in the English- and Dutch-speaking Caribbean and their diasporas, the UK and the Netherlands. It explores how the understanding and formation of sustainable community for the Caribbean and its global diaspora may be supported by art practice, curating and museums. The collection was developed through a two-year international research project (2012-14) led by Leon Wainwright, with Co-Investigator Kitty Zijlmans (Leiden University), focused on major public events in Amsterdam and London. The project is funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO/Humanities).

You can read this online or download it in PDF format now:
https://openartsjournal.org/issue-5/

Blue moon diamond and naming jewels

You might have heard in the news that a Hong Kong businessman purchased a rare diamond for $48 million dollars from Sotheby’s yesterday. You might have also picked up on the fact that he renamed the gem after his daughter ‘Blue Moon of Josephine.’ The naming of jewels is certainly not a modern phenomenon. Indeed it was a popular thing to do in the Renaissance when jewels were given names from David to ‘Il Spigo’ (Lavender) to  ‘Semperviva.’ These names could reflect the qualities of the stones (in the case of lavender) but could also point to the magical properties that these particular gems were believed to possess (from promoting a male heir to detecting poison). Jewels and gems, of course were clear social and economic signifiers, just as they are today, and frequently in the Renaissance, they were used as liquid capital. For more on the function of jewels in the Renaissance, you might like to listen to the talk related to this over on the Open Arts Archive, delivered at Cambridge in 2014.

What fascinates me is the continued tradition of naming jewels, which individualises them and allows them to be traced in history from the Kohinoor to the Hope Diamond. Their value is certainly attached to the rarity of the gem, but the naming of jewels and the tales that are told about them surely contribute to their economic as well as symbolic value. As the Blue Moon of Josephine was only found in South Africa last year, it will be interesting to see what histories are written and what tales are told about this diamond.