open & Inclusive SIG: Presentations on Assistive Technology & UX Accessibility

logoJoin us for the next open & Inclusive SIG on Wednesday 1st December (14:00-16:00) where we will be joined by Julie Eshleman, talking about her work with Assistive Technology, and Beatriz Gonzalez Mellidez, presenting on UX accessibility work using personas and designing for extremes. More information below.

For an invite please contact openTEL. All are welcome!

Presentation 1

Title:
Technology for Adults in Care Settings – Finding What Works

Abstract:
The last two years have seen a dramatic increase in both mainstream and specialist technology purchases within social care – both to empower the workforce to conduct tasks more efficiently and as tools for disabled adults to stay connected with loved ones during a very difficult year. With this speed of technology integration, we have missed the opportunity to carefully understand what we are doing and why we are doing it – in our fixation to get technology in place, we have made technology the goal rather than the way to achieve goals. I am conducting research through the University of Stirling Continue reading

Presentations from Michigan University 24.11.21

Assessment & Feedback SIG Wednesday 24th November 14:00-15:30 (UK)
Please join us for the next Assessment & Feedback Special Interest Group where we will have presentations from external speakers, Cait Hayward and August Evrard, from Michigan University.

Abstract:
Letter grades have long served as signaling mechanisms between an institution’s faculty and its students, and making the Dean’s List remains an aspiration of students on most American campuses.  In this presentation, we offer three short talks with a common thread of student advantages and barriers.  We first demonstrate that increased selectivity – the tendency of an institution to admit students with increasingly higher standardized test scores – is an important factor in the rise of undergraduate grades over the past decade.  The findings allow us to refine measures of faculty-related grade inflation, and we introduce grade susceptibility, the conditional distribution of student grade earned as a function of incoming standardized test score, as a measure with broader potential application.  We then pivot to a study of student grades in large STEM courses across multiple institutions that features an integer variable, a systemic advantage index, incorporating dimensions of birth sex, underrepresented minority status, family income, and first-generation college status.  Across seven public US universities, students with high advantage index earn consistently higher grades than their low advantage counterparts, objective evidence that corroborates the persistence of systemic inequities in American STEM education. We conclude with a current project that aims to identify particular courses where systemic advantages are most impactful on student grades, and share these patterns with instructors via a rich data report that highlights opportunities for potential pedagogical changes.  Continue reading

Show & TEL Nov. 2021: Agenda & Abstracts

 

AGENDA

Tuesday 2nd November (09.30 – 12.30)
09.30 – 10.10 Welcome & introduction: Eileen Scanlon: Celebrating openTEL
10.10 – 10.50 Trevor Collins & Shailey Minocha – The pedagogical design of a badged open course on the ‘Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in STEM’
10.50 – 11.00 BREAK
11.00 – 11.40 Koula Charitonos – “We have dealt with this covid situation randomly”: a peer ethnographic approach to researching approaches to English language teaching in refugee contexts
11.40 – 12.20 Kathy Chandler –  students’ experiences of synchronous online tutorials in health and social care
12.20 – 12.30 Afterword & Close

Wednesday 3rd November (10.00 – 12.30)
10.00 – 10.10
Welcome
10.10 – 10.50 Mark Gaved, Saraswati Dawadi, Agnes Kukulska-Hulme – ReMaLIC: how English and ICT can reduce or reinforce marginalisation in education
10.50 – 11.30 Victoria Murphy – The Trouble With EdTech in Organisations
11.30 – 11.40 BREAK
11.40 – 12.20 Xinyu Huang – Interact with Holographic AIs
12.20 – 12.30 Afterword & Close

ABSTRACTS 

Title:
The pedagogical design of a badged open course on the ‘Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in STEM’ Continue reading

Learning @ Scale SIG – 12th October 2021

Tuesday 12th October 11:00 – 12:30

Join us online for presentations from Anna De Liddo and Tracie Farrell plus facilitated discussion with Special Interest Group lead, Rebecca Ferguson.


Contested Collective Intelligence: Harnessing the power of coming together, even when we disagree. 
Anna De Liddo

Abstract:
Technology has brought the world closer together than ever before. However, today it is often blamed for sewing social division. We can’t overlook the internet’s role in fanning the flames of division. Fake news and social media bubbles filter our reality and have the power to entrench us on one side of the argument and prevent us from understanding others’ views. However, my research also finds that technology can be a powerful tool to help us find common ground, even in cases when it appears we couldn’t be farther apart.

In this talk I will present intuitive online technologies to help people think critically, make sense and build consensus, even when they disagree. I will then discuss research results from real-life applications of such tools to bridging divides in political communication, healing divisions in post-war situations, and crowdsourcing community capabilities toward learning at scale.

Mis(sing) Information: Investigating the Role of Values, Ideologies and Events on How We Become Misinformed
Tracie Farrell

Abstract:
Misinformation is everywhere on social media. It spreads faster and deeper than other forms of information because it surprises us, triggers our fears, and raises strong emotions within us. Computational research tends to focus on Continue reading

José Luis Aznarte presents at the next Assessment & Feedback SIG

Assessment & Feedback SIG
Wednesday 6th October, 2021 (14:00 – 15:30 UK)

In this talk José Luis Aznarte will cover UNED’s experience in digitalizing the exam/assessment process during the pandemic lockdowns. Starting with a brief review of our standard assessment protocol, we will dive into the decision process during the emergency provoked by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, including the rejection of invasive forms of vigilance. We will share the results of a social research into the expectations and satisfaction levels of the student community regarding the technical and social aspects of the solution finally adopted by the university.

Speaker Bio
José Luis Aznarte is an associate professor at the Department of Artificial Intelligence of the UNED university and deputy vice-chancellor for intelligent data and resources management. He graduated in Computer Science by the University of Granada (Spain) and there he obtained his PhD. He was a post-doc researcher with the Renewable Energy Research Group in the Center for Energy and Processes of the MINES ParisTech engineering school (France). He was awarded a Ramón y Cajal tenure-track grant. Nowadays he coordinates research about applications of data mining, machine learning and soft computing, especially in the framework of time series forecasting. He is involved in the development of operational solutions for personalized learning, air quality forecasting and public health. He coordinates the UNED-EMT Chair on Sustainable Mobility and Air Quality.

ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1636-244X

A recording of this session is available for OU staff here.

For an invite, or to be added to the Assessment & Feedback SIG mailing list, please contact openTEL. All are welcome!