Category Archives: ORDO

Adding your ORCiD to ORDO

Did you know that as well as linking ORO to ORCiD you can also link your ORCiD with your ORDO profile? This will add all your datasets in ORDO (and anywhere else that uses a DataCite DOI) to ORCiD.

This is really quick and easy to do, simply follow these steps:

  • In your profile page in ORDO (pictured), click the CONNECT button to enable syncing with your ORCiD
  • This will take you to ORCiD. Log in and click to authorise ORDO/Figshare to access your ORCiD account

You now need to authorise DataCite on your ORCiD account:

  • Log in to ORCiD
  • Go to your ORCiD Record tab
  • Scroll down to works at the bottom of the page
  • Hover on the +Add Works tab
  • This will open a dropdown menu
  • Click on the first item on the menu, Search and Link
  •  This will open a panel called Link Works. Find DataCite in the list.
  • Click on DataCite and on the following page click to authorise

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To check the authorisation has worked successfully head back to ORCiD and to your Account Settings tab. DataCite should now be listed as a Trusted organisation.

If you’re having problems setting this up or would like more information about using ORDO or ORCiD, please get in touch.

ORDO best practice #4 – sharing videos

The latest instalment of my series on best practice in ORDO looks at sharing videos.

In late 2017, we were approached by Dr Erica Borgstrom from the faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies. Erica’s research focuses on death and dying, with a particular focus on end of life care. Over the course of the previous year she had been running a series of seminars on death and dying, all of which had been recorded and posted on an OU hosted website. Erica was concerned that the website would not be supported for much longer and that the videos were of high interest and needed to be made available to the public on another platform.This is where ORDO comes in – by putting the videos of the seminars on ORDO, they were given the security and credibility of being hosted on an OU platform, and we were able to guarantee that they would be maintained for a minimum of 10 years. Adding the videos to ORDO gave each one a DOI, enabling Erica and the seminar presenters to cite them at conferences or in papers and ensuring that they are recognised as valid research outputs. ORDO allows in-browser viewing of most audiovisual file types which means that the videos don’t need to be downloaded to be watched. We were also able to add metadata to the records to enable discoverability, and upload extra background documents alongside the videos to add context.Finally, we grouped all the videos together into one collection, giving the entire seminar series a DOI and ensuring that they are seen as a complete body of work.

Seruset Borgstrom, Erica (2017): Open University Death and Dying Seminar Series. figshare. Collection. https://doi.org/10.21954/ou.rd.c.3825658.v2 

Since the seminar series was uploaded to ORDO in January 2018, the videos have consistently featured in our top ten most viewed items. They have been viewed almost 7,500 times and downloaded 571 times.

A brief note from Erica:

I found working with ORDO and the library staff very helpful and exciting. Uploading and storing the videos in this way make them easy to share with a much wider audience and helps us fulfil our mission as an open, and accessible, university. The seminar speakers have also appreciated the professional platform to recognise their talk as a research output.

ORDO monthly online drop-ins

Did you know, on the first Thursday of every month between 14.00 and 15.00 we run an online drop-in for ORDO, our research data repository?

We’re here to help, whether you’re interested in using ORDO but not sure where to start, or you’ve been using it for a while and have questions about how to make the most of it.

To join, go to our Adobe Connect “Research Support” page and click on “join room” (and if you find the link takes you to the “DISS Home” page instead, click on “Resources” at the top and scroll down to “Research Support”).

Dates for the next few months:

  • Thursday 1st August 14.00-15.00
  • Thursday 5th September 14.00-15.00
  • Thursday 3rd October 14.00-15.00

Hope to see you there!

ORDO best practice #3 Data underpinning theses

In the latest instalment of my series of blog posts discussing best practice in ORDO, I’m going to highlight some of the datasets underpinning PhD theses that have been deposited in ORDO.

Like OU research staff, postgraduate researchers are expected to deposit any research data underpinning their theses in a trusted data repository.  There are numerous benefits to doing this, including:

  • enabling verification of results
  • increasing your visibility as a researcher (great for career progression)
  • ensuring that you have continued access to your data even when you have left the OU
  • providing the possibility for re-use of data

Historically, research data or other digital materials underpinning theses have sometimes been put on a CD and enclosed with the hard copy of the thesis, lodged at the Library. However, from August 2019, the OU Library will only accept digital copies of theses which will be stored in ORO. This means that the old method of putting data onto CDs will no longer be possible.

Ideally, you should deposit your data or other materials in ORDO ahead of submission, so that you can include a Data Access Statement (which contains a DOI) within the body of your thesis.

Within the ORO record for your thesis, there is a field for “Related URLS” into which you can add your ORDO DOI as a “research dataset”. We also advise that you add the ORO URI to your ORDO record. We are looking into how we might be able to automate this process in the future.

A selection of datasets underpinning theses on ORDO

 

 

 

ORDO best practice #2 Archiving a website

Continuing my series on best practice in ORDO, this time I’m going to trumpet The Robert Minter Collection: https://doi.org/10.21954/ou.rd.7258499.v1 which was deposited by Trevor Herbert in December 2018. According to the ORDO record:

This is a copy of the data underlying the website ‘The Robert Minter Collection: A Handlist of Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Trumpet Repertory’ which contained a database of music collected by Robert L. Minter (1949-81).

Minter’s interest was in the collection of sources that contribute to our understanding of the trumpet at various points in its history before the twentieth century.

This is regarded as one of the world’s largest fully catalogued datasets about early trumpet repertoire.

The website in question was created in 2008 and is no longer active, however it had been archived by the Internet Archive, most recently in May 2017. In 2018, Trevor approached the Library for help archiving the data contained on the website because he was aware that although the Internet Archive had maintained much of the information, not all functionality and content had been preserved; most crucially the database itself is no longer searchable.               

ORDO was deemed a good fit for creating an archive of the content of the website. It allows the deposit of any file type and enables in-browser visualisation of many of these so it is not always necessary to download documents in order to view them. By depositing the material in ORDO, Trevor also obtained a DOI (Digital Object Identifier) – a persistent, reliable link to the record which will be maintained even if the materials are no longer available for any reason. Any materials added to ORDO are guaranteed to be maintained for a minimum of ten years.

Within the record there are four files – an access database, a csv copy of the data, a zip file containing information about the collection, database and website and a list of files in the zip file. The description in the record makes it clear to any potential users what they are accessing and how they can be used. Since it was deposited in December, the collection has been viewed 139 times and downloaded 18 times. Now that deserves a fanfare!

ORDO best practice #1 Documenting data

Over the coming months I’m going to focus on some examples of best practice on ORDO. The creators of all the items in this series will receive a reusable Figshare coffee cup as way of thanks and congratulations.

The first series of items I’m going to focus on are the OpenMARS Database datasets (https://doi.org/10.21954/ou.rd.c.4278950.v1) , deposited by James Holmes (STEM) earlier this year. From the data record:

“The Open access to Mars Assimilated Remote Soundings (OpenMARS) database is a reanalysis product combining past spacecraft observations with a state-of-the-art Mars Global Circulation Model (GCM). The OpenMARS product is a global surface/atmosphere reference database of key variables for multiple Mars years.”

Since their deposit in February, these datasets have been downloaded a total of 291 times, making them some of the most popular items on ORDO. This is a fine reward for all the hard work that went into preparing them for sharing.

What’s so good about them?

There are four datasets which are published individually and also grouped together as a collection. The most impressive thing about these is the documentation accompanying these datasets, which is excellent:

  • On the landing page for each dataset is a description, which clearly details the provenance of the dataset and information about the OpenMARS project
  • Each dataset has a PDF reference manual. This can be read in the browser, and as the datasets are large (~25GB each) and use a file format that requires specialist software and does not display in the browser (.nc) this means that users can decide if the data is useful before download
  • The documentation within the reference manual is very detailed and includes information on access (using a sample Python script included in the dataset), structure of the dataset, provenance and quality assurance
  • The datasets clearly reference the funding body – the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation programme

Is it FAIR?

The gold standard for research data is that it should be FAIR – Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Re-usable. These datasets fulfill all but one of the criteria detailed in Sarah Jones and Maarjan Grootfeld’s FAIR data checklist (original version at https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.1065991).  It only falls down on the fact that the data are not in a widely available format, but considering the nature of the data this would be very difficult to achieve, and since the reference manuals are very accessible, this issue is dealt with. See the completed checklist.

And finally, a word from James…

‘Adding datasets produced by our team at the Open University that will be of interest to multiple different users was really simple to do using the ORDO system, and the team that manage it were very helpful if I had any questions during the process. Thanks!’

 

Data Conversation – talking with researchers about open data

A couple of weeks ago we held an informal event for researchers to share their experiences and knowledge of working with research data.

The idea was to hear from researchers about how they work and what’s important to them, away from the (valuable but not always so exciting) talk about complying with funder policies and writing data management plans. We hoped this would start some conversations and potentially help build a community around research data management at the OU.

If that sounds familiar it could be because it’s something Lancaster University have been doing very successfully for a while. The suggestion to plan a similar event at the OU came from talking with our friends at Figshare (the repository our research data repository, ORDO, uses), in particular Megan, who also gave us lots of help before and during the event. So, with thanks, we pinched Lancaster’s idea and even the name ‘Data Conversation’.

We had a theme of ‘open data’ and invited OU researchers to come along to talk on that topic for about 15 minutes – and were delighted to have a brilliant line-up of talks.

Our speakers

David King – a Visiting Fellow in Computing & Communications, David talked about the history of his work with biodiversity and agriculture data, and the many systems he has used to manage and share information. We heard how technologies and tools like DOIs, institutional repositories (hello ORO and ORDO!), and collaborative document management like Office365 can help to work with and share research data. David also touched upon his joint research in the Humanities with Francesca Benatti on the A Question of Style project. You can see David and Francesca’s slides here.

Sarah Middle – Sarah’s a PhD student studying Digital Humanities/Classical Studies, and talked about her PhD in using linked data in Ancient World research. Through examples of Sarah’s work linking UK Arts and Humanities project data, and working with the British Library on Privy Council appeals data, we saw how openly available data can be re-used. However, re-using that data can require a lot of work to make it usable in a new format, and to be sure if, and how, it can be shared further. Sarah also took us through the process she has gone through to ensure the data she collects from surveys and interviews can be as open as possible, by working with the OU’s ethics committee and library research support.

Nancy Pontika – Nancy is Open Access Aggregation Officer at CORE, (the Open Access repository based in the OU’s Knowledge Media Institute), and told us about the work CORE does to provide research publications to anyone, anywhere, by harvesting content from open access repositories. CORE has over 135 million metadata records and 11 million full text items and makes its API and dataset open for others to use freely. We also heard about the development of the upcoming analytics dashboard, for institutions to assess the impact of their research outputs. You can see Nancy’s slides here.

Tony Hirst – A Senior Lecturer in Telematics, Tony gave us a whirlwind tour of the many ways he has used open data to answer topical questions, or really to investigate anything that he finds of interest (including the companies connected to Iron Maiden). It was a great demonstration of how an inquisitive and playful approach can produce novel information by combining freely available datasets. You can find many examples of Tony’s work in these links, and generally on his blog OUseful.Info. Tony had delivered an earlier session for the library team here at the OU, about how virtual machines and Jupyter notebooks can be used in teaching and research data sharing, which really piqued our interest too.

Discussion

Along to hear the talks and join the discussion were a mix of researchers, research support staff and librarians. After the talks and follow up discussion we had some round table discussions on ‘open data’ topics:

  • What most interests you about sharing your data openly?
  • What might prevent you from sharing your data?
  • Where might you go (or have you gone) for support on sharing your data?
  • Where might you look to deposit your data, and why?

These images show the ideas we captured (click on them to see in detail):

From all of this some themes emerged:

  • Making data ‘open’ can be a tricky thing to do. Echoing what we often find when working with researchers – that working out where to put it, how to organise and describe it, and whether it is indeed ok to share it (e.g. for personal or otherwise sensitive data) takes time and effort. Then actually doing it takes time too.
  • There are lots of resources and people to go to for support and advice. This is great and shows a commitment from funders, institutions and, most importantly, researchers to work openly. Is there a risk that that it can be hard to pick your way through to the relevant information you need? Possibly.
  • Is it intrinsic or something extra? For some, data sharing is part of their work (See our speakers for example). For others it is seen as an extra task to do at the end of a project or when publishing.
  • There doesn’t have to be one ‘right way’. In the talks we heard positive examples of data being shared and used in a variety of ways. Things like ORCID, DOIs and metadata standards can help identify and link data consistently, but beyond that we don’t all have to use the same methods and systems.
  • It is well worth doing. We were to an extent preaching to the choir, but the mood in the room was that it is certainly well worth doing. Our speakers illustrated a variety of uses and approaches where open data enables and supports research, and the comments we noted for ‘What most interests you about sharing your data openly?’ highlighted benefits for data authors, data re-users, research participants and for generally improving research.

How can we help?

So what can we, as a library, do?

  • We can continue to provide the tools and systems to store, preserve and share research data.
  • We can support researchers in using them – and when they do, we can help promote and connect the data and other outputs they share.
  • We can continue to provide advocacy, training and advice on data sharing to make researchers aware and prepared to share when planning their work.
  • We can also continue to listen and have conversations with researchers about what they are doing, their priorities, and what would help them to do it.

Next Steps?

We’d love to have another Data Conversation in the new year on a new topic. If you’d like to take part – either to speak about your work or join to hear what others have been up to – please get in touch library-research-support@open.ac.uk

And thanks again to everyone who came along!

Written by Dan Crane, Research Support Librarian.

Training offer: Making your research data open

There are spaces available on our training session ‘Making your research data open‘ on Tuesday (27th November 2018), 10:00 to 11:30.

Photo by Finn Hackshaw on Unsplash

In this session we will look at why, how, what and when to share data:

  • Why should you share your data? We’ll discuss the benefits and the reasons why data sharing is such a hot topic at the moment.
  • How can you do it? We’ll take a look at the OU’s data repository, ORDO, and provide guidance on preparing data for sharing, including sensitive data
  • What should you share? Do you need to share everything? What do funders and publishers want you to share?
  • When should you share? We’ll the look at the stages of the research process when sharing data is most useful to you and others.

Sign up via My Learning Centre – any if you have any questions, get in touch at library-research-support@open.ac.uk.

ORDO online drop-in

Our monthly online drop-in session for ORDO is tomorrow, Tuesday 4th September, 11:30 – 12:30.

Ask Dan about using our research data repository, ORDO, for data preservation, data sharing, showcasing your work, collaborative projects… and anything else.

To join, go to our Adobe Connect “Research Support” page and click on “join room” (and if you find the link takes you to the “DISS Home” page instead, click on “Resources” at the top and scroll down to “Research Support”).