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Centre Director

Dr Carol Jacklin-Jarvis

Dr Carol Jacklin-Jarvis

Carol spent over 20 years working in public and voluntary organisations before returning to academia to research voluntary sector leadership and collaboration.  Previous posts include Director of Amber Valley CVS and Strategy Manager for Localities and Childcare at Poole Borough Council.  In 2014, she became a lecturer in the Department for Public Leadership and Social Enterprise (PuLSE), where she teaches on modules focused on collaboration, leadership, and ‘management beyond the mainstream’.  She is co-author of CVSL's open access courses on leadership in the voluntary sector, author of an undergraduate block on Collaborative Leadership, and contributor to the OU's new module on Leadership in a Changing World.

Carol's research addresses the experiences of voluntary sector leaders as they collaborate with public agencies, building directly on her own work experience.  Her interest is in research that makes a difference to practice, impacting on the development of leadership in voluntary organisations and collaborative contexts.  With CVSL colleagues, Carol was a member of the Lloyds Bank Foundation funded research The Value of Small that explored the specific contribution of smaller voluntary organisations.  She has written about the development of voluntary action in new housing developments, and, with Karen Potter, about the similarities and differences between voluntary organisations in the welfare and environmental domains and their different experience of collaboration with the state.

Centre Chair

Professor Siv Vangen

Professor Siv Vangen

Siv is Professor of Collaborative Leadership, founding director and Chair of the Centre for Voluntary Sector Leadership. Her research, which has spanned two decades, focuses on governing, leading and managing inter-organisational collaboration. The aim of Siv’s research is to explore the complexity that underlies collaborative situations in practice, to investigate the challenges that are intrinsic to them and to develop conceptual frameworks that can in turn inform collaboration in practice. Over the years, her joint research with Emeritus Professor Chris Huxham, has evolved into a theory of collaborative advantage (TCA). Through the CVSL, Siv aims to continue to develop the TCA through research that focuses on issues of particular concern to voluntary organisations.

Centre Members

Dr Jacqueline Baxter

Dr Jacqueline Baxter

Jacqueline Baxter is Director of the Centre For Research and Innovation in online legal and business Education  and is Chair of B100, one of the largest population modules in the business school. Her research interests lie in the area of public sector governance,  accountability and trust. She is particularly interested in how volunteer boards and trustees create and implement strategy within the complex and rapidly changing area of education in England. As part of this, her work takes an interdisciplinary approach which includes areas such as: trustee motivation, trustee identity, sense making activities of public sector boards, and the role of the volunteer in public sector governance and leadership. She tweets at @drjacquebaxter and blogs. Her most recent book investigates the relationship between trust and accountability in education systems. 

Professor Chris Cornforth

Professor Chris Cornforth

Chris Cornforth is Emeritus Professor of Organisational Governance and Management at OUBS. His research focuses on the governance and leadership of third sector organisations and has helped break new ground both theoretically and methodologically in understanding the behaviour of governing bodies, their relations with senior managers and the role of chairs. He has published widely in academic journals and books, and in a range of publications for practitioners. He is a trustee of the Association of Chairs, that provides training and support to Chairs and Vice Chairs of voluntary and non-profit organisations.

Daniel Haslam

Daniel Haslam

Daniel is a Lecturer in the Business School's Department of Public Leadership and Social Enterprise. He has spent most of his adult life working, volunteering, and researching in and around the voluntary sector in England. His roles have spanned a variety of different areas, from working as a personal support officer to working on strategic policy development. He has carried out these roles in a variety of different organisations, from small, local service providers to a national charity. Daniel has also spent several years as a trustee of a local charity, including a year as chair during a period of great organisational change. His experience covers criminal justice; learning disability/difficulty; sexual orientation and gender identity; and mental health. 

 

Gemma Lord

Gemma is a Lecturer in Organisational Behaviour at OUBS. She was previously at the University of Manchester where she completed a PhD in the Business School, after undertaking a Research Route MA in Politics: Governance and Public Policy. Before returning to higher education, Gemma worked for nine years in public and voluntary sector organisations. Gemma’s research with voluntary sector organisations is centrally concerned with their management and their function in shifting contexts of society, politics, technology and economy. Her areas of research that are linked with CVSL focus upon the implications of austerity policies on the organisation and management of voluntary sector organisations that are delivering public contracts of ‘social care’ in the UK. This research aims to generate exploitable findings for the practice within, and the management of, voluntary sector organisations that are involved in cross-sector collaboration within the increasingly competitive public contracting context. On a broader level, Gemma is interested in how organisational purpose and ethics of care are enacted ‘on the ground’ and how these are implicated by state-market-civic governance formations and associated policy reforms.

Michael Ngoasong

Michael Ngoasong

Michael is a Senior Lecturer in Management and Director of Masters Programmes at OUBS. Michael’s main research interest centres on the links between entrepreneurship and development, with case studies spanning tourism, healthcare, energy, agribusiness and digital technology sectors. Recent research include a British Academy funded collaborative project with Dr Albert Kimbu, University of Surrey, which involved stakeholder engagement workshops debating and evaluating the commercial and social transformational impacts of women as owner-managers of small tourism firms. As Online Education Consultant, his previous research on global public-private partnerships in access to medication informed the Health Leadership and Management Training.

Karen Potter

Karen Potter

Karen is a Visiting Fellow in PuLSE. Karen’s recent research interest in the voluntary or third sector was somewhat ‘accidental’, working closely with Rivers Trusts as their role in natural flood risk management was recently extended under the new government initiative ‘Catchment Based Approach’ (CaBA) (from 2011).  Initially seeing Rivers Trusts and other environmental NGOs as the policy entrepreneurs in this arena, she has been working closely with Carol Jacklin-Jarvis to further an understanding of the policy and practice implications of the government’s novel policy initiative to engage with NGOs to deliver on water quality and flood risk management policy.

Dr James Rees

Dr James Rees

James is Deputy Director of the Institute for Community Research and Development at the University of Wolverhampton. He was previously the Anthony Nutt Senior Research Fellow and Director of CVSL. His work is inter-disciplinary and is concerned with the voluntary sector in its broadest sense, but also more particularly in relation to current transformations in public services in the UK. Recent research has focused on the role of the third sector in service delivery, cross-sectoral partnership, commissioning, and organisational change and the role of citizens and service users, drawing on a range of theoretical traditions in the fields of governance and organisational studies.

Dr Owain Smolovic-Jones

Dr Owain Smolovic-Jones

Owain teaches and researches leadership and its development, primarily in the public and voluntary sectors. His approach is political, particularly focusing on the power dynamics of learning and enacting leadership. Owain completed his PhD at Cranfield University under the supervision of Keith Grint, researching the political dynamics of public sector leadership development programmes. Prior to entering academic life, he worked in communications for the Labour Party.

Dr Vita Terry

Dr Vita Terry

Vita is a Researcher at IVAR. She has a long-standing interest in the third sector, actively participating in the refugee sector in different capacities, including as policy researcher and volunteer, and for several years has been a trustee of a small local HIV charity. Vita’s main research area is the third sector, including focusing on small organisations, service provision, organisational change, hybrid organisational forms, actors and agency, and she has drawn on theoretical principles from institutional logics. Vita has expertise in qualitative methods and interest in using particular research approaches, including ethnography and participatory methods.

Dr Helen Britton

Dr Helen Britton

Helen is an educational practitioner, researcher and entrepreneur. After starting her professional life in the chemical industry, she re-trained to teach mathematics and to develop her entrepreneurial interests in construction and property restoration. She has lectured in mathematics and Access to Science and Technology. Helen has almost three decades of experience of designing and delivering innovative and inclusive courses and capital projects as part of multi-stakeholder initiatives within the United Kingdom. She acts as a consultant, approved training provider and contractor for several housing and voluntary sector organisations, local authorities and private businesses. Helen is a Fellow of the Society for Education and Training. Her research interests are multi-disciplinary and embrace creativity and innovation; trust and risk and exploring the contradictory nature of collaboration involving community and voluntary organisations. Her broader areas of interest encompass philanthropy through individual mentoring and community development initiatives in South Africa where she provides skills development, funding and works alongside local training providers in the delivery of literacy, numeracy, creativity and construction initiatives.

Fidele Mutwarasibo

Dr Fidèle Mutwarasibo

Fidèle has worked in various capacities in the voluntary sector for over two decades. His experience includes working in community development (Rwanda); emergency and relief (Democratic Republic of Congo); immigration, migrants’ integration, advocacy; and equality, diversity and inclusion - EDI (Ireland). Since moving to the UK, he has been active in Citizens:MK, Citizens UK, MK Community Foundation and most recently joined the board of trustees of MK Gallery. Fidèle’s focus in the UK has been on EDI and hate crimes. Passion and interest in social justice underpin his social practices in the voluntary sector. His research expertise is on mobilisation and leadership in migrant and refugee-led voluntary sector organisations. At The Open University, he has worked on several initiatives as a consultant. These include the Year of Mygration with Citizenship and Governance and the International Development & Inclusive Innovation Strategic Research Areas; local learning clubs with Centre for Voluntary Sector Leadership; and on civic leadership with the Citizenship and Governance Strategic Research Area.

Research Students

Lindsey Elliott

Lindsey Elliott

Lindsey is a pragmatic, interdisciplinary researcher. Her academic background is in biology (BSc), tropical forestry (MSc) and agroforestry (MSc) but her interests have focussed on the relationships between people and the environment, and between organisations working to protect the environment. She has worked for and researched voluntary organisations striving to protect the world’s biodiversity and is keen to help find ways to enable them to effectively collaborate together and with other sectors such as academia, business and policy. Her PhD involves action research with a world leading collaboration between conservation NGOs and academic institutions to find practical ways to enable transdisciplinary collaboration.

Ronald Macintyre

Ronald Macintyre

Ronald has worked in open and distance education at the Open University since 2003, teaching on various OU modules in education and technology, authoring courses on sustainability and working as a researcher into the scholarship of teaching learning. Most recently this involved exploring the design production and use practices associated with free open online materials. Typically this involved working in partnership with other HEI and non-informal learning providers, in particular Third Sector organisations. Ronald was the R&D Manager of a Scottish Government programme Open Educational Practices Scotland hosted by the OU in Scotland. Ronald has also maintained a personal and professional interest in the Third Sector, through directorships of various community companies and social enterprises and through his consultancy work. His research will build on this earlier work into participatory design, digitisation and the Voluntary Sector. You can find his profile on the OU open resource repository. Follow the development of his research at his blog

Cristina Mititelu

Cristina Mititelu

Cristina is the Anthony Nutt PhD Scholar and commenced her research in October 2016. Her research interests focus on commissioning for social value and understanding the relationships between local authorities and voluntary sector organisations in the provision of public services. She is interested in the implementation of social value in the commissioning process and the role of voluntary sector organisations in England. Within her previous role as a researcher and teaching assistant, her work also covered a variety of areas, including corporate social responsibility, public governance and citizen engagement in the local authorities. She has been involved in research projects and postgraduate training programs on non-profit organisations, social innovation and social responsibility.

Akash Puranik

Akash Puranik

Prior to the beginning of his PhD with The Open University, Akash has worked as a lecturer on MBA programmes delivered by Glyndwr University and University of Wales, designing and delivering modules for strategy, marketing and business environment. His background in the service and education industry, involvement with numerous charities as well as his personal interest in understanding ethical and moral implications of ‘working together’ inform his research work. The focus of Akash’s doctoral research is on exploring how non-contractual, informal collaborations, set up with the intention of benefiting communities, are organised. His ethnographic work intends to develop an inductive understanding of such a unique phenomenon through an in-depth exploration of exceptional cases.

Sally Vivyan

Sally Vivyan

Sally holds a BSc in International Relations from LSE and an MSc in Development Management from the OU. She worked in the third sector for 13 years (in International Development and grant making charities) and is now a Research PhD student in PuLSE. Sally’s thesis is exploring leadership practice in new asylum seeker and refugee charities. Her study adopts a Leadership as Practice lens and is relevant to both the leadership and voluntary sector literatures.