You are viewing information for England.  Change country.

Engineering: frameworks, analysis, production

Qualification dates
Start End

This module builds on the concepts and techniques in Engineering: origins, methods, context (T192). It begins by focusing on invention and innovation, and the advisory or legislative frameworks used to promote good practice and ensure safety. Examples of patents, standards and an energy case study are examined, providing a basis for introducing key topics in engineering and mathematics. Next, it takes you on a tour of modern manufacturing methods, and explores how these are related to properties of materials, product design, environmental sustainability and profitability. More advanced mathematical techniques, including basic calculus, are introduced and applied in an engineering context.

What you will study

Part 1 – Engineering to rule

You will explore the ideas of innovation and invention, and the advisory or legislative frameworks used to promote good practice and ensure safety. These include patents, standards, industry guidelines, and other official sources of data, information and guidance. Examples will be chosen for closer examination that introduce key engineering topics. You will study aspects of the mechanical and electrical properties of materials, the behaviour of structures under load, and basic chemistry.

Part 2 – Electricity from sunlight

In this part you’ll explore the important topic of producing energy for human use. You will learn more about the advantages and disadvantages of fossil fuels and the growing need for low carbon energy. A case study looks more closely at one alternative approach – the production of electricity from sunlight using photovoltaic panels. Fundamental topics covered include the use of chemical equations, the nature and properties of electromagnetic radiation, and the structure and properties of electronic materials.

Part 3 – Manufacturing

Next, you will build on your growing understanding of the properties of materials. You will learn about key manufacturing techniques, and when and how they can be used to make products. The techniques covered include casting, forming, cutting, joining, surface engineering and additive manufacturing.

Part 4 – Materials and resources

The final part will present some case studies of the use of materials and resources, putting manufacturing into a wider context of environmental and economic considerations.

Mathematics is an essential component of engineering and is included throughout the module. You will have opportunities to revise and build on the mathematics covered in Engineering: origins, methods, context (T192), by applying it to new topics in engineering. New mathematical methods in algebra, geometry, trigonometry, graphical representation, statistics and calculus will be introduced and applied.

You will be helped to develop your information literacy skills through library searches and technical reading linked to patents and standards. The Open Engineering Studio provides an online space where you can share work with other students and work together on collaborative activities. You will use a learning log to record and reflect on your progress.

Throughout the module, interactive quizzes will give you a chance to practise maths questions to prepare for the interactive computer-marked assignments (iCMAs). Assignment questions will be based on activities in the module material.

This module provides ideal preparation for the third of our introductory engineering modules, Engineering: mathematics, modelling, applications  (T194).

Professional recognition

This is a key component of all OU engineering qualifications. The learning outcomes for these qualifications are designed to fulfil the Engineering Council’s requirements under UK-SPEC and are accredited by several engineering institutions as fulfilling the educational requirements for professional recognition.

Entry requirements

This is a key introductory OU level 1 module. OU level 1 modules provide core subject knowledge and study skills needed for both higher education and distance learning, to help you progress to modules at OU level 2.

This module is designed to follow on from Engineering: origins, methods, context (T192). Normally, you should be studying or have completed Engineering: origins, methods, context (T192) before you are allowed to register for this module. You cannot begin studying both modules at the same time. 

If you have any doubt about the suitability of the module, please speak to an adviser.

What's included

Four module books, module handbook, module map, assessment guide, access to the module website which includes online study material and activities.

You will need

A scientific calculator, basic drawing equipment and a device capable of producing digital images (e.g. a smartphone, digital camera or scanner).

Computing requirements

A computing device with a browser and broadband internet access is required for this module.  Any modern browser will be suitable for most computer activities. Functionality may be limited on mobile devices.

Any additional software will be provided, or is generally freely available. However, some activities may have more specific requirements. For this reason, you will need to be able to install and run additional software on a device that meets the requirements below.

A desktop or laptop computer with either:

  • Windows 7 or higher
  • macOS 10.7 or higher

The screen of the device must have a resolution of at least 1024 pixels horizontally and 768 pixels vertically.

To participate in our online-discussion area you will need both a microphone and speakers/headphones. 

Our Skills for OU study website has further information including computing skills for study, computer security, acquiring a computer and Microsoft software offers for students. 

Teaching and assessment

Support from your tutor

You will have a tutor who will help you with the study material and mark and comment on your written work, and whom you can ask for advice and guidance. You will also be able to receive support from a wider pool of tutors through specialist forums and study events.

We expect to be able to offer group tutorials or day schools that you are encouraged, but not obliged, to attend. Where your tutorials are held will depend on the distribution of students taking the module. Online study events will also be offered.

Contact us if you want to know more about study with The Open University before you register.

Assessment

The assessment details for this module can be found in the facts box above.

You must use the online eTMA system to submit your tutor-marked assignments (TMAs).

You must also submit your end-of module assessment online.

There are four interactive computer-marked assignments (iCMAs). These do not count towards your final mark, but you need to reach a threshold on at least three of them to pass the module.

If you have a disability

The OU strives to make all aspects of study accessible to everyone and this Accessibility Statement outlines what studying T193 involves. You should use this information to inform your study preparations and any discussions with us about how we can meet your needs.

Future availability

Engineering: frameworks, analysis, production (T193) starts twice a year – in April and October. This page describes the module that will start in October 2018 and April 2019. We expect it to start for the last time in October 2024.

Course work includes:

2 Tutor-marked assignments (TMAs)
4 Interactive computer-marked assignments (iCMAs)
End-of-module assessment
No residential school