Entry requirements

There are no formal entry requirements to study this qualification.

If you choose the networking topic at Stage 2 you will be required to attend four UK-based day schools to gain hands-on practical experience of configuring networks.

Study skills for this qualification

The BSc (Honours) Computing & IT and a second subject begins with the module My digital life (TU100) which builds a solid foundation for further study. Although it’s an introductory module, to get the best from it you’ll need some basic knowledge of computing, and the ability to read and write to a good standard of English. You can use our online diagnostic quiz Are you ready for TU100? to help you decide if you’re ready, or if you need some extra preparation.

If you’re thinking about choosing mathematics as your second subject, check that you’re ready for mathematical study at this level by visiting our MathsChoices website.

General study skills

Anyone can study with The Open University, but if it's a while since you did any academic work it's worth checking that your time management, computing and English skills are up to speed. Visit Can I do it? to find out more.

How much time do I need?

  • Most of our students study part time completing 60 credits a year.
  • This will normally mean studying for 16–18 hours a week.
Read about how some of our students have fitted OU study into their lives, then find out if you have enough time to study by completing our time planner.

Help! I'm not sure I'm ready!

Study for free

If your study skills are a bit rusty or you want to try out Open University study before committing yourself, don’t worry! You can get started with an Access module – fascinating courses designed to introduce subject areas, build your confidence and prepare you for further study.

For this qualification, we recommend:

Science, technology and maths Access module

What you will study

This fascinating, multidisciplinary module is an ideal starting point if you have little or no previous knowledge of the sciences, technology and mathematics, and would like to develop both your subject knowledge and your study skills. The subjects included are science, engineering and design, environment, mathematics, and computing and IT.

View full details of Science, technology and maths Access module

Your next step

Call us on +44 (0)1908 659253 or book a call back. Our friendly team of advisers will discuss your study options with you, and help you decide on the best starting point for you. Or come and meet us at an event near you.

How much will it cost?

We believe cost shouldn’t be a barrier to achieving your potential. That’s why we work hard to keep the cost of study as low as possible and have a wide range of flexible ways to pay to help spread, or even reduce, the cost.

  • Fees are paid on a module-by-module basis – you won't have to pay for the whole of your qualification up front.
  • A qualification comprises a series of modules, each with an individual fee. Added together, they give you the total cost.
  • If (like most OU students) you study part time at a rate of 60 credits a year, you'll take six years to complete an honours degree. Our current fee for 60 credits is £2,700*.
  • Our current fee is £5,400* – based on 120 credits of study – which is equivalent to a year's full-time study.
  • The total cost of your chosen qualification starts from £16,200* based on our current fees.
  • This qualification includes modules with a higher than typical cost. This will increase the overall cost of the qualification quoted. Please call us for further information.
  • This qualification includes modules with a higher than typical cost. If you choose to study one of these modules the overall cost of the qualification may increase. Please call us for further information.

*The fee information provided here is valid for modules starting before 31 July 2016. Fees normally increase annually in line with inflation and the University's strategic approach to fees.

Additional costs

Study costs

There may be extra costs on top of the tuition fee, such as a laptop, travel to tutorials, set books and internet access.

If you're on a low income you might be eligible for help with some of these costs after you register.

Ways to pay for your qualification and other support

We know there’s a lot to think about when choosing to study, not least how you can pay. That’s why we offer a wide range of flexible payment and funding options to help make study more affordable. Options include Part-Time Tuition Fee Loans (also known as student loans), monthly payment plans and employer sponsorship. 

We’re confident we can help you find an option that’s right for you.

Just answer these simple questions to find out more about the options available to you for courses starting before 31 July 2016.

How many credits are you planning to study per year? You will need [xxx] credits to complete this qualification

Part time study

Full time study

Do you already hold a degree?

Are you employed?

British Forces

  • If you have a BFPO address, you are only eligible for UK course fees if you are a currently serving member of the British armed forces, and you're temporarily and unavoidably working abroad. Other students using BFPO addresses should contact us on +44 (0)300 303 5303 for UK fee eligibility to be assessed.
* The fee and funding information provided here is valid for courses starting before 31 July 2016. Fees normally increase in line with inflation and the University’s strategic approach to fees.

An OU qualification will always help you stand out from the crowd, now and in the future – whether you’re just starting out, developing your career, or changing direction entirely.

Skills for career development

Organisations increasingly value IT teams with skills relevant to wider business in addition to technical ability. This joint honours degree enables you to develop specialist knowledge and understanding in computing and IT, and to combine these with expertise in an additional discipline. Depending on your choice of second subject – business, design, mathematics, applied psychology or statistics – you’ll have a unique and focused skills set that will enhance your existing career and put you in a strong position in the jobs market, which increasingly depends on computing technologies across all sectors. You’ll also develop important transferable skills such as teamwork, time management, numeracy, analysis and problem solving.

Career relevance

Research by e-Skills UK has shown that IT and telecommunications now employs 1 in 20 of the UK workforce. It also suggests the digital sector will need nearly 300,000 new recruits by 2020 to meet the demand for skills in this area.

Computing and IT professionals are in demand by providers (such as software houses) and user organisations alike. Organisations increasingly value IT teams with skills relevant to wider contexts in addition to technical ability. This degree will open the way for careers in sectors including retail, finance and commerce, leisure and gaming, telecommunications, broadcast media, digital media, manufacturing, transport, tourism, government, health, education, and the voluntary sector.

Growth areas and areas of high demand include cyber security, mobile development, cloud computing and the management of Big Data, in roles such as:

  • app developer
  • data analyst
  • web developer
  • software engineer
  • network architect
  • security analyst.


We design our computing degrees to meet the accreditation requirements of BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT. Our undergraduate degrees have been accorded the highest levels of recognition in the last three accreditation cycles, and we are seeking re-accreditation for this degree for students graduating from 2015.

Other careers

The range of organisations employing computing and IT graduates is extensive. Beyond pure technology roles, some graduates also enter management consultancy firms or corporate roles, while others go into technical writing roles or work freelance.

Many graduate-level jobs are open to graduates of any discipline, particularly in business, finance, management consultancy and the public sector. Some careers may require further study, training and/or work experience beyond your degree.

In addition to improving your career prospects, studying with the OU is an enriching experience that broadens your horizons, develops your knowledge, builds your confidence and enhances your life skills.

Exploring your options

Once you register with us (and for up to three years after you finish your studies), you’ll have full access to our careers service for a wide range of information and advice – including online forums, website, interview simulation, vacancy service as well as the option to email or speak to a careers adviser. Some areas of the careers service website are available for you to see now, including help with looking for and applying for jobs. You can also read more general information about how OU study enhances your career.

In the meantime if you want to do some research around this qualification and where it might take you, we’ve put together a list of relevant job titles as a starting point (note that some careers may require further study, training and/or work experience beyond your degree):

  • technical sales
  • app developer
  • data analyst
  • web developer
  • software engineer
  • network architect
  • security analyst
  • cyber-security manager.

Want to see more jobs? Use the career explorer for job ideas from the National Careers Service, PlanIT Plus in Scotland and Prospects across all nations. You can also visit GradIreland for the Republic of Ireland.


When you register on an Open University course, you’ll get all sorts of ideas and materials to help you prepare for study.

But if you can’t wait until then, here are some tantalising and fascinating videos to give you an idea of the quality of our learning programmes and a flavour of the OU’s unique style of teaching.


Why should we be interested in information security?

Cory Doctorow explains that, as the world is made out of computers, every part of life is at risk if people don't understand the information security dimension.

Colossus: the world's first electronic computer

A look at the Colossus computer at The National Museum of Computing at Bletchley Park.


A look at how video conferencing provides medical support doctors in Nepal, as it enables real-time communications.

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