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Public engagement

The Open University has an international reputation for research that is open and publicly engaged.

Built on our practices of collaboration and multi-disciplinary working, our research culture is ‘open to people, places, methods and ideas’, in line with the University's mission. 

Our dedication to public engagement is embedded in our long-term research strategy, and exemplified by our commitment to the National Coordinating Centre’s (NCCPE) Manifesto for Public Engagement and the Concordat for Engaging the Public with Research.

We were delighted to become a signatory to the Manifesto for Public Engagement. Engagement has always been an integral part of our open learning mission, putting students at the heart of everything we value.

Peter Horrocks, Vice-Chancellor

Becoming a signatory to the NCCPE Manifesto presented an opportunity to embed its principles within our research culture, incorporating the perspectives of stakeholders, user communities and members of the public.

We are committed to maintaining the conditions where public engagement can flourish and where excellence in research engagement is recognised and valued.

In embedding the principles, values and practices of publicly engaged research within the OU, we are ensuring that our research has relevance in wider society.

Rewarding engagement

The OU believes in effective and widely recognised mechanisms that reward and recognise excellence in public engagement. Our Engaging Research Award Scheme was designed to find and celebrate high-quality engaged research in the University.

Our criteria for academic promotion now includes a new knowledge exchange route for progression from lecturer through to professor.

Find out how we can work with you

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News

ThinkstockPhotos-896151015 - This is an artists concept of Cassini during the Saturn Orbit Insertion (SOI) maneuver

Cassini crashes: it’s time for a new mission to explore the possibility of life on Saturn’s moons

NASA’s Cassini mission has made its “death plunge” into the swirling clouds of Saturn after 20 years of exploring the planet and its moons.

18th September 2017
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