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Year of Mygration

Migrants and migration matter to The Open University and to all of us.

The Open University's Year of Mygration stands as a remarkable introduction to diverse perspectives of migrants and migration. The Open University is ‘open to people, places, methods and ideas’ so has always welcomed migrants as students and staff, and has encouraged pioneering methods of learning, teaching, research and engagement around the themes of migration, refugees, mobility and belonging. 250 separate contributions have been gathered under the heading of a Year of ‘My-gration’ to emphasise that we are all affected by migration, whether or not we ourselves or immediate families are migrants. The issues of migration are vital to understanding not just current UK politics but also the world’s economies and communities.

The origins of this Year of Mygration are in a collaboration between the Citizenship & Governance and the International Development & Inclusive Innovation Strategic Research Areas of the OU. The idea was to share a reflection every day, Monday to Friday, for 50 weeks of a year, on the broad theme of migration which showcased the work of the OU academics and our partners, be it a short blog, podcast or archive clip, a tweet or a link to a longer article. We numbered the posts from 1 to 250 partly so that anyone can start their own Year of Mygration in any year and at any point in any year. We appreciate that migrants and the whole world live with migration 7 days a week for the whole 52 weeks of the year but we believe that there is a value in this exercise and we would welcome anyone creating their own sequels. As the OU enters our 50th anniversary year, 2019, we remain committed to being ‘open to people, places, methods and ideas’.

IOM logo

Day 220, Year of #Mygration: Migration 2018 - What's currently happening?

In today’s post, we delve into statistics on people risking their lives to reach Europe through the Mediterranean Sea. The data compiled by the International Organization for Migration is accessible on the OU's OpenLearn platform

7th November 2018
Dr Umut Erel

Day 219, Year of #Mygration: How time and place matter for migrants’ social mobility

In today’s post, Dr Umut Erel, a Senior Lecturer at The Open University, explores how migrants’ cultural, social and economic resources impact on their settlement in the countries of destination

6th November 2018
Festival of Social Science logo

Day 218, Year of #Mygration: Who is a Migrant? Experience the realities

Join us tomorrow for a workshop as part of the ESRC Festival of Social Science in Belfast. Organised by Dr Gunjan Sondhi from the OU, the event will give participants an opportunity to address some of the misconceptions about immigration

5th November 2018
Image of a black and white eye, painted

Day 217, Year of #Mygration: Who are we? Art, migration and democracy

Join The Open University next week in Belfast for a Learning Lab focusing on the theme 'Who are We?'. The Learning Lab will draw on the collaborative work between the OU and Counterpoints Arts as part of Tate Exchange

2nd November 2018
Photo of young boy reading the wall of hateful headlines at the Migration Museum in London (c) Heidi McCafferty

Day 216, Year of #Mygration: Mum and Dad, I want to be normal

In today's post, Dr Fidèle Mutwarasibo, a Visiting Research Fellow in The Open University's Centre for Voluntary Sector Leadership, explores the experiences of migrant children who have resettled in new societies and the notion of feeling 'normal'

1st November 2018
Robert Mpiira, BRAC International’s Country Research Coordinator in Uganda

Day 215, Year of #Mygration: The Role of Refugees in Development Management: Are Refugees a Burden or a Blessing? A View From Uganda

Today’s post comes from Robert Mpiira, BRAC International’s Country Research Coordinator in Uganda, and current Commonwealth Scholarship student studying for an MSc in Development Management with The Open University

31st October 2018
Photo of Munich by Oleksandr Masliuchenko

Day 214, Year of #Mygration: Methods in Motion with the mothers of Munich & Birmingham

Today’s article comes from Agata Lisiak, former Visiting Fellow at The Open University and Professor of Migration studies at Bard College in Berlin, Germany. She explores the fast-changing world of research into migration and belonging

30th October 2018
Union jack flag

Day 213, Year of #Mygration: Migration goes both ways: How Brits changed the world

'It's easy to forget that the British Isles have proved as fertile a ground for migrants heading elsewhere as it has a pull to migrants from overseas', says Professor Tanja Bueltmann from Northumbria University. Today she looks at the impact British migration to the US

29th October 2018
Cartoon saying Refugees Welcome

Day 212, Year of #Mygration: What is this political space we call 'immigration'?

Today we share an article originally published on openDemocracy and later shared on OpenLearn, by Dr Steve GarnerHead of Criminology & Sociology at Birmingham City University. In it, he explores four frames that inform how ‘white Brits’ perceive immigration

26th October 2018

Day 211, Year of #Mygration: New report highlights the human rights situation in Northern France

It has been two years since the demolition of the Calais ‘Jungle’ camp. Today, Help Refugees has co-published a report with Refugee Rights Europe in order to highlight the human rights situation which has been unfolding in Northern France

25th October 2018

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Citizenship and governance logo

A-Z of Brexit: A guide to Brexit terminology

This glossary has been designed to explain some of the key terms used in relation to Brexit.

Download the guide

Year of Mygration

250 insights into how migration affects all of us, not just migrants.

Posted throughout 2018, 5 days a week for 50 weeks, ahead of the OU’s 50th anniversary celebrations in 2019.

Learn about the campaign

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Check out the October 2018 newsletter:

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