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Events: Faculty of Social Sciences

Advanced Image Elicitation Training Methods module on participation

20 April 2015 - 1 May 2015

Online

Would you like to know more about how to use and theorise image-based methods in your research?

The Open University is offering free, ESRC-funded, on-line advanced training on image elicitation methods.

Aimed at PhD, early career researchers and those seeking to develop their methodological expertise, this on-line training offers a flexible way to enhance understanding of these important social science methods.

The training, delivered in three short modules, will provide opportunities for participants to share their research and explore case studies from contemporary social science research in small groups, facilitated by experienced visual researchers.

Module two: You will participate!: Will complicate the rhetoric of participation, critically addressing the claim that visual research methods inherently facilitate collaborative working by inviting participants to consider the wider political and cultural context of participation.

This module two will run Monday, 20th April 2015 to Friday, 1st May 2015.Please indicate your interest by completing the pre-registration proforma. The closing date for applications is Friday, 20th March 2015.

 

Criminal Justice Policy Review: 'The Coalition years' & The Scottish Dimension

22 April 2015 (17:30 - 19:30)

The Open University in Scotland

The approach to a General Election is an appropriate point at which to look back at criminal justice policy during the period of the Westminster Coalition and how this has, or has not, impacted on Scotland. This seminar - organised by the International Centre for Comparative Criminological Research (ICCCR) and The OU in Scotland - seeks to do just that.

Its starting point will be with the Centre for Crime and Justice Studies' Criminal Justice Policy Review: the Coalition Years, published in March 2015, examining recent trends in criminal justice policy at the level of the UK and across the four nations. Richard Garside, Director of the CCJS, will open the seminar by speaking to the document, and in particular its Scottish dimensions. Four contributions on various aspects relevant to 'criminal justice policy', broadly defined, will then follow, with insights from academia, Scottish politics and Scottish campaigning. The second hour of the two hour event will consist of a Q&A and an open discussion.

Speakers:

Richard Garside, Centre for Crime and Justice Studies

Gerry Mooney, ICCCR

Mary Munro, Strathclyde University

Lisa Whittaker and Fiona McHardy, Poverty Alliance (Glasgow)

 

How it became easier to borrow than to save

29 April 2015 (6.00 - 8.15pm)

St Luke's Community Centre, 90 Central St, London EC1V 8AJ (near Old Street / Barbican)

Book launch, discussion & drinks reception

The savings rate in the UK has been falling steadily since the 1960s, with borrowing increasingly taking its place. This has affected the poor more than most. Where once contributions to private saving and insurance schemes were widespread among lower socio-economic groups, the last fifty years have seen attitudes towards financial planning change dramatically. People now borrow far more readily than they save; visits from door-to-door insurance premium collectors have now often been replaced by threats from debt collectors.

How did this happen and what are the consequences? This debate accompanies the launch of two books that set the history of these changes in practical context. What impacts do the marketing devices and financial instruments of the insurance, credit and debt industries have on the way people manage their spending? What can we learn about the relationship between these future-focused financial products and how we make economic decisions? What challenges do they pose that societies and governments have yet to adequately address?

The debate turns on the arguments in two recently published books in Routledge's CRESC Culture, Economy and the Social series; Joe Deville's 'Lived Economies of Default: Consumer Credit, Debt Collection and the Capture of Affect' (see here) and Liz McFall's 'Devising Consumption: Cultural Economies of Insurance, Credit and Spending' (see here) and explores their academic contributions and implications for contemporary policy.

The debate will open with brief contributions from

Liz McFall, The Open University

Don Slater, London School of Economics

Joe Deville, Goldsmiths

Noortje Marres, Goldsmiths

There will then be an open discussion, followed by a drinks and snacks reception.

The event is sponsored by Journal of Cultural Economy and The Centre for Citizenship, Identity and Governance (CCIG), with support from the Centre for the Study of Invention and Social Process (CSISP) and the Political Economy Research Centre (PERC).

Related links

Link Registration

Contact

Email

 

Advanced Image Elicitation Training Methods module on the future of image-elicitation methods

15 June 2015 - 26 June 2015

Online

Would you like to know more about how to use and theorise image-based methods in your research?

The Open University is offering free, ESRC-funded, on-line advanced training on image elicitation methods.

Aimed at PhD, early career researchers and those seeking to develop their methodological expertise, this on-line training offers a flexible way to enhance understanding of these important social science methods.

The training, delivered in three short modules, will provide opportunities for participants to share their research and explore case studies from contemporary social science research in small groups, facilitated by experienced visual researchers.

Module three: The future of image elicitation: Will explore how visual research methods may develop in the future, given the pervasiveness of digital technology by both researchers and their research project participants.

This module two will run Monday, 15th June 2015 to Friday, 26th, June 2015.Please indicate your interest by completing the pre-registration proforma. The closing date for applications is Friday, 15th May 2015.

 

Student Connections Online Conference - Postponed (new dates TBC)

1 September 2015

Online (via http://connections.kmi.open.ac.uk)

The Faculty of Social Sciences has taken the decision to postpone the Student Connections conference that had been provisionally planned for March 2015. New dates for the conference will be posted on the conference website later this year: http://connections.kmi.open.ac.uk

The Student Connections Conference 2015 is for students with interest in social sciences; it is open to all and is entirely free, and all you need to take part is log on via any web browser.

Related links

Link Conference website

Contact

Email Conference team