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Kath Holden and Mike Roper on social history of psychoanalysis

On 16th of Feb., 2012, CCIG hosted an Event organised by the Psychosocial Research Programme: “What Difference Does the Psychosocial Make?”

On 16th of Feb., 2012, CCIG hosted an Event organised by the Psychosocial Research Programme: “What Difference Does the Psychosocial Make?”

This event aimed at exploring the following: in what ways is a psychosocial approach new? What does it entail methodologically and what is its theoretical genesis and scope? Does it offer any real advance on established ways of understanding individual experience and meaning-making; patterns of intersubjective interaction; dynamics of institutional life? Is its analytical power limited to investigations of micro-social interaction or can it be utilized in the service of bigger scale social and cultural analysis? If so, does it lead to a reinstatement of the very division between the psychological and sociological that it claims to refute? In other words: What Difference Does the Psychosocial Make?:- and to what and for whom?
This was the focus of this seminar. It seeked to engage this question via a series of substantive papers that take up questions of the social history of psychoanalysis as considered through research into the private life and domestic relationships of two key psychoanalysts.
 
The audio material features the keynotes given by Kath Holden and Mike Roper.
 
Kath Holden (University of West England) teaches history and women's studies. Dr. Holden is also the secretary of the Southwest Women's History Network and a member of the steering committee for the National Women's History Network. She presented her research on ‘The Long Hand of the Nanny: John Bowlby and Child Care in Early and Mid-Twentieth Century Britain’.
 
Mike Roper is professor at the University of Essex. His research interests include the social and psychological history of masculinity in twentieth century Britain; family relationships and emotional experience in the First World War; biographical and psycho-social methods; and the use of psychoanalytic ideas in historical and biographical research. He presented his research on ‘Remembering and Containing: the First World War Memoirs and Psychoanalytic Thought of Wilfred Bion’.

 

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