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the experience of reading in Britain, from 1450 to 1945...

Reading Experience Database UK Historical image of readers
 
 
 
 

Listings for Author:  

Jean Racine

  

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Jean Racine : Athalie

'On the facing verso of the MS [of Letter to the Bishop of Llandaff], [Wordsworth] ... copies out Athalie I.ii.278-82, 292-94 ... '

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Jean Racine : Athalie

Thomas Moore on encountering W[ordsworth] in Paris on 24 Oct. 1820: 'A young Frenchman called in, and it was amusing to hear him and Wordsworth at cross purposes on the subject of "Athalie"; Wordsworth saying that he did not wish to see it acted, as it would never come up to the high imagination he had formed in reading it ... '

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Jean Racine : Andromache

?We saw at Brussels two of the best Paris actors, and Madame Talma. The play was Racine?s Andromache (initiated in England as the Distressed Mother.) Madame Talma played Andromache and her husband Orestes. .. We read the play in the morning, an excellent precaution, otherwise the novelty of the French mode of declamation would have set my comprehension at defiance.?

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Maria Edgeworth      Print: Book

  

Jean Racine : Andromaque

'This evening the fine trajedy of Racine "Andromaque" was read I did not hear all the play but I have read it before'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth (Betsey) Wynne      Print: Unknown

  

Jean Racine : Les Plaideurs

'In the evening I wrote to Mary Montalban and to her husband, and we read "Les Plaideurs" which made us laugh like fools'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Wynne and others     Print: Unknown

  

Jean Racine : plays

Elizabeth Barrett to her uncle, Samuel Moulton-Barrett, c. December 1816: 'I have finished "Telemaque," and have read one, or two of Racines plays, which I like very much'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Jean Jacques Racine : plays

Elizabeth Barrett to Hugh Stuart Boyd, 8 September 1830: 'I have been reading lately with my brothers some of Racine's plays [...] It is several years since I read them by myself; and if they disgusted me then, they are intolerable to me now. The French have no part or lot in poetry [goes on to complain of what she perceives to be excessive formality and orderliness of French neoclassical poetry]'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett and younger Moulton-Barrett brothers     Print: Book

  

Jean Jacques Racine : plays

Elizabeth Barrett to Hugh Stuart Boyd, 8 September 1830: 'I have been reading lately with my brothers some of Racine's plays [...] It is several years since I read them by myself; and if they disgusted me then, they are intolerable to me now. The French have no part or lot in poetry [goes on to complain of what she perceives to be excessive formality and orderliness of French neoclassical poetry]'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Jean Racine : Letters

Mary Russell Mitford to Elizabeth Barrett, 1 February 1838: 'I have just been reading Racine's "Letters," and Boileau's. How much one should like both, if it were not for their slavish servile devotion to the king (and I think it was real), and to that odious woman Madame de Maintenon.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Russell Mitford      Print: Book

  

Jean Racine : 

Wednesday 23 October 1929: 'Since I have been back [apparently to London, from Sussex home] I have read Virginia Water (a sweet white grape); God; -- all founded, & teased & spun out upon one quite simple & usual psychological experience; but the mans no poet & cant make one see; all his sentences are like steel lines on an engraving. I am reading Racine, have bought La Fontaine, & so intend to make my sidelong approach to French literature, circling & brooding'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Virginia Woolf      Print: Book

  

Jean Racine : unknown

'I have been reading John Racine: it is very standard − damnd[sic] standard, I beg your pardon.[] I like John Racine, however; the noise is very pleasing and as unintelligent and soothing as a mill wheel; occasionally too there are verses of a dignity! − Verses with Versailles wigs − pageant verses − like a Roman Triumph.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Louis Stevenson      Print: Book

  

Jean Baptiste Racine : 

E. M. Forster to Robert Trevelyan, 29 January 1918: 'I have been reading Racine and Claudel.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Edward Morgan Forster      Print: Book

  

Jean Racine : 

'As for his private occupations [during 1834], my father was still reading his Racine, Moliere, and Victor Hugo among other foreign literature; and had also dipped into Marurice's work Eustace Conway, which appears [from letters] to have been in great disfavour, and into Arthur Coningsby by John Sterling, "a dreary book"'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Alfred Tennyson      Print: Book

  

Jean Racine : 

'As for his private occupations [during 1834], my father was still reading his Racine, Moliere, and Victor Hugo among other foreign literature; and had also dipped into Marurice's work Eustace Conway, which appears [from letters] to have been in great disfavour, and into Arthur Coningsby by John Sterling, "a dreary book"'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Alfred Tennyson      Print: Book

  

Jean Racine : unknown

'Conrad's face would cloud over. He would snatch up a volume of Racine and read half a dozen lines.'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Conrad      Print: Book

  

Jean Racine : [unknown]

Except Shakespeare, who grew from childhood as part of myself, nearly every classic has come with this same shock of almost intolerable enthusiasm: Virgil, Sophocles, Aeschylus and Dante, Chaucer and Milton and Goethe, Leopardi and Racine, Plato and Pascal and St Augustine, they have appeared, widely scattered through the years, every one like a 'rock in a thirsty land', that makes the world look different in its shadow.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Freya Stark      Print: Unknown

  

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