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the experience of reading in Britain, from 1450 to 1945...

Reading Experience Database UK Historical image of readers
 
 
 
 

Record Number: 2368


Reading Experience:

Evidence:

'George Acorn, growing up in extreme poverty in London's East End, scraped together 31/2 d to buy a used copy of David Copperfield. His parents punished him when they learned he had wasted so much money on a book, but later he read it to them: "And how we all loved it, and eventually, when we got to 'Little Em'ly', how we all cried together at poor old Peggotty's distress. The tears united us, deep in misery as we were ourselves".'

Century:

1850-1899

Date:

unknown

Country:

England

Time

n/a

Place:

city: London

Type of Experience
(Reader):
 

silent aloud unknown
solitary in company unknown
single serial unknown

Type of Experience
(Listener):
 

solitary in company unknown
single serial unknown


Reader / Listener / Reading Group:

Reader:

George Acorn

Age:

Child (0-17)

Gender:

Male

Date of Birth:

n/a

Socio-Economic Group:

Unknown/NA

Occupation:

n/a

Religion:

n/a

Country of Origin:

England

Country of Experience:

England

Listeners present if any:
e.g family, servants, friends

family


Additional Comments:

n/a



Text Being Read:

Author:

Charles Dickens

Title:

David Copperfield

Genre:

Fiction

Form of Text:

Print: Book

Publication Details

n/a

Provenance

owned


Source Information:

Record ID:

2368

Source:

Print

Author:

Jonathan Rose

Editor:

n/a

Title:

The Intellectual Life of the British Working Classes

Place of Publication:

New Haven

Date of Publication:

2001

Vol:

n/a

Page:

111

Additional Comments:

n/a

Citation:

Jonathan Rose, The Intellectual Life of the British Working Classes, (New Haven, 2001), p. 111, http://www.open.ac.uk/Arts/reading/UK/record_details.php?id=2368, accessed: 29 February 2020


Additional Comments:

See George Acorn, 'One of the Multitude'.

   
   
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