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the experience of reading in Britain, from 1450 to 1945...

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Listings for Author:  

Mason

  

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William Mason : Caractacus

'[opinion of William Mason's play, "Caractacus", entered in diary]: 'My soul melted into every pleasing sensation, the language charming! divine harmony, beams in every line such a love of virtue! such examples of piety, resignation and fortitude! raise the soul to an ecstatic height. Sweet Evelinda how my heart throbbed for her!'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Anna Larpent      Print: Book

  

William Mason : Elfrida

'You did not tell me before, that you had read the Hermit and Alfrida. There are charming Things in both. I read them when they first came out, having a great opinion of the poetical capacity of both gentlemen. I was not disappointed. I forget the story of the Hermit, and its management: But in general I was pleased with it. Mr Mason has a fine genius... But I thought his piece was rather too poetical. - A strange censure of a fine piece of poetry. In other words, that he was too lavish, in other words. of his poetical talents...'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Richardson      Print: Book

  

William Mason : Elfrida

'You did not tell me before, that you had read the Hermit and Alfrida. There are charming Things in both. I read them when they first came out, having a great opinion of the poetical capacity of both gentlemen. I was not disappointed. I forget the story of the Hermit, and its management: But in general I was pleased with it. Mr Mason has a fine genius... But I thought his piece was rather too poetical. - A strange censure of a fine piece of poetry. In other words, that he was too lavish, in other words of his poetical talents...'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Bradshaigh      Print: Book

  

A.E.W. Mason : Ensign Knightley

[List of books read in 1943, in diary for 1943]: 'The Farthing Spinster; Guy Mannering; Whereas I was Blind; And So to Bath; The Story of San Michele; Attack Alarm; The Murders in Praed Street; Lover's Meeting; The Secret Battle; Witch Wood; MD - Doctor of Murder; Murder at the Keyhole; That Girl Ginger; Ten Minute Alibi; Diary of a District Officer; Tarzan the Untamed; Peter Abelard; Pip; Pied Piper; A Man Lay Dead; Random Harvest; Madame Curie; Stalky and Co; Bellarion; Down the Garden Path; The Three Musketeers vol 1; The House in Cornwall; A Tall Ship; The Two Saplings; Farewell Victoria; Quinneys; House of Terror; Penguin Parade 4; Guy Mannering[presumably a re-reading]; The Man Born to be King; Casterton Papers; Old Saint Paul's; The Moon is Down; 1066 and all That; My Brother Jonathon; Gulliver's Travels; Ensign Knightley; Men Against Death; Fame is the Spur; Gone with the Wind; Mesmer; First Nights; The Hound of the Baskervilles; Little Gidding; Beau Geste; Beau Sabreur; The Amazing Theatre; The Pleasure of Your Company; Dandelion Days; Humour and Fantasy; Juno and the Paycock; The Beautiful Years; Teach Yourself to Think; Salar the Salmon; The Cathedral; The Mysterious Mr I; The Picts and the Martyrs; The Dream of Fair Women; The Star-born; Three Short Stories; A Thatched Roof; The Surgeon's Log; The Healing Knife; Nine Ghosts; While Rome Burns; The Star Spangled Manner; The Day Must Dawn; The Tower of London; Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde; The Old Man's Birthday; A little Princess; Ego 5; The Lighter Side of School Life; Kidnapped; The Trail of the Sandhill Stag; Ballet Lover's Notebook; Lorna Doone; The Plays of JM Barrie; Jane Eyre; I'll Leave it to You; Henry Fifth; Longer Poems; Antony and Cleopatra; The Man in Grey; The House in Dormer Forest; The Writing of English; Miss Mapp; The Song of Bernadette; Happy and Glorious; Sixty Poems; The Birth of Romance; The Comedy of Life; Some Little Tales; Dream Days; Royal Flush.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

William Mason : [items in Dodsley's Miscellanies]

'In Dodsley's "Miscellanies" there are two or three pretty pieces of Mr Mason. Bacon's "Life by Mr Mallet" perhaps you have seen. He is not near so good a Man, I fear, as Mr Mason'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Richardson      Print: Book

  

William Mason : Poems (third volume)

The Dowager Lady Spencer to Mary Berry, from Nuneham (seat of George Simon, second Earl of Harcourt), 21 August 1799: 'Have you ever seen the 3d vol. of Mason's Poems, published two years ago? I never did till I came here; and I have found some sweet things in them, which I have been reading this morning in the flower-garden facing the cinerary urn Lord Harcourt has erected to his memory [goes on to transcribe final six lines of sonnet written by Mason 'in his 70th year'].'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: G., Dowager Lady Spencer      Print: Book

  

Mason : Plays

'My chief acquaintance with the writers of the eighteenth century is derived from reading to Aunt Lyddy papers in the [italics]Spectator[end italics] and [italics]The Rambler[end italics], Mason's plays, Addison's [italics]Cato[end italics], etc. This we were often called to do when we were invited to dine with Aunt Clarke [reader's great-aunt, to whom "Lyddy," Sewell's father's unmarried sister, a companion].'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Sewell      Print: Book

  

[William] [Mason] : Caractacus

'I have read since last October a good deal of the history relating to the East...: not much of books not connected with India [but included] ... In poetry, ... "Caractacus" ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mountstuart Elphinstone      Print: Book

  

Mason : [Plays]

'My chief acquaintance with the writers of the eighteenth century is derived from reading to Aunt Lyddy papers in the "Spectator" and "The Rambler", Mason's plays, Addison's "Cato" etc. This we were often called upon to do when we were invited to dine with Aunt Clarke'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Missing Sewell      Print: Book

  

William Mason : Memoirs of Gray

'Instead of melting down my materials into one mass, and constantly speaking in my own person, by which I might have appeared to have more merit in the execution of the work, I have resolved to adopt and enlarge upon the excellent plan of Mr Mason, in his Memoirs of Gray [ie connecting quotations, conversation and letters with narrative]'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Boswell      Print: Book

  

William Mason : [Memoir of William Whitehead]

'That the conversation of a celebrated man, if his talents have been exerted in conversation, will best display his character, is, I trust, too well established in the judgment of mankind, to be at all shaken by a sneering observation of Mr Mason, in his "Memoirs of Mr William Whitehead", in which there is literally no "Life", but a mere dry narrative of facts'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Boswell      Print: Book

  

William Mason : Elfrida

'The "Odes to Obscurity and Oblivion," in ridicule of "cool Mason and warm Gray", being mentioned, Johnson said, "They are Colman's best things." [Boswell reports a conversation about their possible joint authorship] Johnson. "The first of these Odes is the best: but they are both good. They exposed a very bad kind of writing." Boswell. "Surely, sir, Mr. Mason's 'Elfrida' is a fine Poem: at least, you will allow there are some good passages in it." Johnson. "There are now and then some good imitations of Milton's bad manner".'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Johnson      Print: Book

  

William Mason : Elfrida

'The "Odes to Obscurity and Oblivion," in ridicule of "cool Mason and warm Gray", being mentioned, Johnson said, "They are Colman's best things." [Boswell reports a conversation about their possible joint authorship] Johnson. "The first of these Odes is the best: but they are both good. They exposed a very bad kind of writing." Boswell. "Surely, sir, Mr. Mason's 'Elfrida' is a fine Poem: at least, you will allow there are some good passages in it." Johnson. "There are now and then some good imitations of Milton's bad manner".'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Boswell      Print: Book

  

William Mason : Elfrida

'I often wondered at his [Johnson's] low estimation of the writings of Gray and Mason. Of Gray's poetry I have, in a former part of this work, expressed my high opinion; and for that of Mr. Mason I have ever entertained a warm admiration. His "Elfrida" is exquisite, both in poetical description and moral sentiment; and his "Caractacus" is a noble drama. Nor can I omit paying my tribute of praise to some of his smaller poems, which I have read with pleasure, and which no criticism shall persuade me not to like'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Boswell      Print: Book

  

William Mason : Caractacus: A Dramatic Poem

'I often wondered at his [Johnson's] low estimation of the writings of Gray and Mason. Of Gray's poetry I have, in a former part of this work, expressed my high opinion; and for that of Mr. Mason I have ever entertained a warm admiration. His "Elfrida" is exquisite, both in poetical description and moral sentiment; and his "Caractacus" is a noble drama. Nor can I omit paying my tribute of praise to some of his smaller poems, which I have read with pleasure, and which no criticism shall persuade me not to like'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Boswell      Print: Book

  

William Mason : [minor poems]

'I often wondered at his [Johnson's] low estimation of the writings of Gray and Mason. Of Gray's poetry I have, in a former part of this work, expressed my high opinion; and for that of Mr. Mason I have ever entertained a warm admiration. His "Elfrida" is exquisite, both in poetical description and moral sentiment; and his "Caractacus" is a noble drama. Nor can I omit paying my tribute of praise to some of his smaller poems, which I have read with pleasure, and which no criticism shall persuade me not to like'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Boswell      Print: Book

  

William Mason : [Poems]

'Mr. Murphy said, that "The Memoirs of Gray's Life" set him much higher in his estimation than his poems did; "for you there saw a man constantly at work in literature". Johnson acquiesced in this; but depreciated the book, I thought, very unreasonably. For he said, "I forced myself to read it, only because it was a common topick of conversation. I found it mighty dull; and, as to the style, it is fit for the second table". Why he thought so I was at a loss to conceive. He now gave it as his opinion, that "Akenside was a superiour poet both to Gray and Mason".'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Johnson      Print: Book

  

William Mason : Heroick Epistle to Sir William Chambers

'Johnson and Shebbeare were frequently named together, as having in former reigns had no predilection for the family of Hanover. The authour of the celebrated "Heroick Epistle to Sir William Chambers", introduces them in one line, in a list of those "who tasted the sweets of his present Majesty's reign". Such was Johnson's candid relish of the merit of that satire, that he allowed Dr. Goldsmith, as he told me, to read it to him from beginning to end, and did not refuse his praise to its execution'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Boswell      Print: Unknown

  

William Mason : Heroick Epistle to Sir William Chambers

'Johnson and Shebbeare were frequently named together, as having in former reigns had no predilection for the family of Hanover. The authour of the celebrated "Heroick Epistle to Sir William Chambers", introduces them in one line, in a list of those "who tasted the sweets of his present Majesty's reign". Such was Johnson's candid relish of the merit of that satire, that he allowed Dr. Goldsmith, as he told me, to read it to him from beginning to end, and did not refuse his praise to its execution'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Oliver Goldsmith      Print: Unknown

  

John Mason : Self-knowledge: A Treatise

'I then read Mason on self knowledge till dinner, not with so much attention as I could wish; I seldom attend sufficiently to what I am reading, to remember at all accurately what I have been reading about'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Gurney      Print: Book

  

John Mason : Self-knowledge: A Treatise

'I had a quiet afternoon on the sofa in my room reading Mason on self knowledge, French, and Job Scott's journal, which I like vastly and found really doing me good, at least edifying me'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Gurney      Print: Book

  

William Mason : 

'It was on the 18: day of July 1773 that we were sitting in the blue Room at Streatham and were talking of Writers - Steele's Essays were mentioned - but they are too thin said Mr Johnson; being mere Observations on Life and Manners without a sufficiency of solid Learning acquired from Books, they have the flavour, like the light French wines you so often hear commended; but having no Body, they cannot keep. Speaking of Mason Gray &c. he said The Poems they write must I should suppose greatly delight the Authors; they seem to have attained that which themselves consider as the Summit of Excellence, and Man can do no more: yet surely such unmeaning & verbose Language if in the Morning it appears to be in bloom, must fade before Sunset like Cloe's Wreath.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Johnson      Print: Book

  

William Mason : 

'He had however no Taste for Modern Poetry - Gray Mason &c - Modern Poetry says he one day at our house, is like Modern Gardening, every thing now is raised by a hot bed; every thing therefore is forced, & everything tasteless'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Johnson      Print: Book

  

William Mason :  'Heroic Epistle to Sir William Chambers'

'There was a very pleasant Copy of Verses ran about the Town that Year [1776], but I forgot to lay them up, & now I have lost Sight of them: they celebrated Mr Rudd's Fame very comically, & ended with a Parody upon Young's Tag to the 4th Act of the Revenge.[some of the parody is given] I have a Notion these Verses were written by Mason, who would not to be sure think it worth while to own them; his being found out to be the Authour of the heroick Epistle shews he has under that appearance of Coldness - a large portion of Fire and pungent Satire'

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: Hester Lynch Thrale      Print: Unknown

  

Mason : Elegy upon the death of the beautiful Countess of Coventry

'As soon as I had learned to read, my great delight was that of learning epitaphs and monumental inscriptions. A story of melancholy import never failed to arrest my attention, and, before I was seven years old, I could correctly repeat Pope's Lines ot the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady; Mason's Elegy on the Death of the beautiful Countess of Coventry; and many smaller poems on similar subjects.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Darby      Print: Book

  

A. E. W. Mason : Konigsmarch

'He read — Sterne, Sydney Smith's letters, Canning's speeches, and two thrillers: A. E. W. Mason's Konigsmarch and Michael Innes's Lament for a Maker ...'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buchan      Print: Book

  

A. E. W. Mason : The Broken Road

'Sunday. Rainy day. Met at 11am for Church Service which was cancelled. Walked about. Read The Broken Road by Mason.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: William Thomas      Print: Book

  

A. E. W. Mason : The Witness for the Defence

'Mon. Nil [i.e., no post]. Sent a PC home. Read "The Witness for the Defence" by AEW Mason.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: William Thomas      Print: Book

  

A. E. W. Mason : The Courtship of Maurice Buckler

'Sat. Nil. Read "Courtship of Morris " by AEW Mason.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: William Thomas      Print: Book

  

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