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the experience of reading in Britain, from 1450 to 1945...

Reading Experience Database UK Historical image of readers
 
 
 
 

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[unknown] : La danse des morts

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Declaration of Principles

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Sammlung vorzuglich schoner Gedichte...

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [books about voyages]

Statement of juvenile offender: "When I left school I went to Mr Banks, bookseller, two years. I had good opportunities of reading then, voyages and such; read the Life of Jack Sheppard. I borrowed it from another boy... I read 'Jack Sheppard' about five months before I began the robberies."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: J.H.      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [political history]

'"One advantage of leaving school at an early age is that one can study subjects of your own choice", wrote Frank Argent, son of a Camberwell labourer. Taking advantage of the public library and early Penguins, he ranged all over the intellectual landscape: Freudian psychology, industrial administration, English literature, political history, Blake, Goethe, Mill,Nietzsche, The Webbs, Bertrand Russell's Essays in Scepticism, and Spengler's The Decline of the West'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Frank Argent      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Ancient Greek literature]

'Lancashire weaver Elizabeth Blackburn... proceeded to an evening institute course in English literature and by the rhythm of the looms she memorised all of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, Shelley's "Ode to the West Wind", Milton's Lycidas, and Gray's Elegy. She discovered the ancient Greeks at the home of a neighbour, a self-educated classicist with six children, and a Sunday school teacher introduced her to the plays of Bernard Shaw. While attending her looms she silently analysed the character of Jane Eyre's Mr Rochester, "sometimes to the detriment of my weaving".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Blackburn      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [basic economics textbook]

[analysis of a female respondent in Arnold Freeman's 1918 Sheffield Survey] 'Munitions worker, age eighteen... Has read Seebohm Rowntree's "Poverty" and a basic economics textbook, as well as "Little Women".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: questionaire respondent      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [various history and biography]

[analysis of a female respondent in Arnold Freeman's 1918 Sheffield Survey] 'Machinist in a shell factory, age twenty-four... Has read Shakespeare, Burns, Keats, Scott, Tennyson, Dickens, Vanity Fair, The Rubiyat of Omar Khayyam, Ella Wheeler Wilcox, biography and history'

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: questionaire respondent      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [physiology textbooks]

'Allen Clark, the son of Bolton textile workers, found physiology books in the public library incomprehensible. A newspaper reference to Rabelais motivated him to borrow Gargantua and Pantagruel, which was no more helpful: "the love passages in the tales were meaningless and boring and I skipped them".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Allen Clark      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [medical book]

'When they were alone at home [Edna Bold] and her cousin Dorothy extracted from the kitchen bookcase and read side by side, a medical book and Foxe's Book of Martyrs. The intertextuality was profoundly scarring: "Childbirth and martyrdom were synonymmous. We suffered the torments of the damned...We never 'reproduced'."'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Edna Bold and her cousin Dorothy     Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [reports on education in Prussia]

'[Millicent, Duchess of Sutherland was] an omnivorous reader -- "she could begin the day with reports on technical education in Prussia, continue it with Huxley's 'Life' and Shakespeare, and ... polish off seven love-stories at the same time ..."'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Millicent, Duchess of Sutherland      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [romantic fiction]

'[Millicent, Duchess of Sutherland was] an omnivorous reader -- "she could begin the day with reports on technical education in Prussia, continue it with Huxley's 'Life' and Shakespeare, and ... polish off seven love-stories at the same time ..."'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Millicent, Duchess of Sutherland      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [American literature]

'As a boy [Walter] Besant had read American authors avidly ...'

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: Walter Besant      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'On Friday afternoon I went to Mudie's. What a fascinating place it is!! I had some peeps into most lovely books, & the bindings were exquisite'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Katherine Mansfield      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [old plays]

'Britain was a mainly urban society...and soon an expanding range of sexual literature became available in the cities. Mark Grossek, the son of a Jewish immigrant tailor in Southwark, acquired his knowledge from grafitti, scandalous stories in the local press, 'Lloyd's Weekly News', 'Measure for Measure', the Song of Solomon, some old plays a fellow student had dug out of his father's library, General Booth's 'In Darkest England', Tobias Smollett, Quain's 'Dictionary of Medicine', as well as Leviticus ("For myself, the most subtle aura of enticement was wafted from the verb 'begat' and the noun 'concubine'")There was also Ovid, but unfortunately the popular translation published by Bohn "had left all the tasty chunks in Latin".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Mark Grossek      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [home medical books]

'Ethel Mannin was an exceptionally liberated letter-sorter's daughter, an early reader of Freud who made something of a career championing sexual freedom in the popular press. But when she approached the subject as a girl, she was far more fearful than informed: "At the board school all the girls were morbidly interested in parturition, menstruation, and procreation... We raked the Bible for information, and those of us who came from homes in which there were books made endless research, looking up in encyclopaedias and home medical works, such words as 'confinement', 'miscarriage', 'after-birth'... We were both fascinated and horrified. At the age of twelve I ploughed through a long and difficult book on embryology"... She copied passages from The Song of Songs into her commonplace book, but was disgusted when she came across the phrase, "Esau came forth from his mother's belly": "It seemed unspeakably dreadful, conjured up visions of sanguinary major operations. I was very miserable...".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Ethel Mannin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [children's comics]

[Communist activists often displayed hostility to literature, including Willie Gallacher. However his 'hostility to literature abated' in later years and in his later memoirs] 'he confessed a liking for Burns, Scott, the Brontes, Mrs Gaskell, children's comics and Olivier's film of Hamlet... Of course he admired Dickens, and not only the obvious Oliver Twist: the communist MP was prepared to admit that he appreciated the satire of the Circumlocution Office in Little Dorrit'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: William Gallacher      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [school stories from The Captain]

'Walter Citrine won, as a Sunday School prize, a volume of school stories from the Captain, including one by P.G. Wodehouse. "The lady who gave this prize awakened in me a thirst for good literature", eventually leading to the works of Karl Marx and his followers'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Walter Citrine      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [boys' weeklies]

'George Scott left school and the boys' weeklies behind at fifteen: in barely a year he had absorbed enough Shaw, Wells, Dos Passos and (secondhand) Marx to lecture his parents on the evils of capitalism'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: George Scott      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [travel books]

'The father of Labour politician T. Dan Smith, a Wallsend miner, was facinated by travel books, Twain's Innocents Abroad, Chaliapin, Caruso, and European affairs. But hardly anyone in their neighbourhood ever ventured outside it'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Smith      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [American History]

'The celebrated singer Sir Harry Lauder, when he was still a mineworker, acquired a fair knowledge of American history: "George Washington and Abraham Lincoln ranked second only in my estimation to Robert Burns and Walter Scott. One of his ...favourite books was a popular biography of James Garfield, 'From Log Cabin to White House'".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Harry Lauder      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [novels]

'As Cornish carpenter George Smith had little access to libraries, he "read every sort of book that came in my way" - novels, history, biblical criticism. He particularly liked mathematics because it was slow reading: "A treatise on algebra or geometry, which cost but a very few shillings, afforded me matter for close study for a year".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Smith      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [history]

'As Cornish carpenter George Smith had little access to libraries, he "read every sort of book that came in my way" - novels, history, biblical criticism. He particularly liked mathematics because it was slow reading: "A treatise on algebra or geometry, which cost but a very few shillings, afforded me matter for close study for a year".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Smith      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [biblical criticism]

'As Cornish carpenter George Smith had little access to libraries, he "read every sort of book that came in my way" - novels, history, biblical criticism. He particularly liked mathematics because it was slow reading: "A treatise on algebra or geometry, which cost but a very few shillings, afforded me matter for close study for a year".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Smith      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [treatises on algebra and geometry]

'As Cornish carpenter George Smith had little access to libraries, he "read every sort of book that came in my way" - novels, history, biblical criticism. He particularly liked mathematics because it was slow reading: "A treatise on algebra or geometry, which cost but a very few shillings, afforded me matter for close study for a year".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Smith      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Sunday School prize books]

'Edwin Whitlock faced...[reading] shortages. A farmer on the Salisbury Downs, he had plenty of time to read while shepherding: "the difficulty was to get hold of books. The only ones in our house were the Bible, a few thin Sunday School prizes, which were mostly very pious publications, and a Post Office directory from 1867, whch volume I read from cover to cover".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Edwin Whitlock      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [religious magazines]

'[Edwin] Whitlock... borrowed books from a schoolmaster and from neighbours: "Most of them would now be considered very heavy literature for a boy of fourteen or fifteen, but I didn't know that, for I had no light literature for comparison. I read most of the novels of Dickens, Scott, Lytton and Mrs Henry Wood, 'The Pilgrim's Progress' and 'The Holy War' - an illustrated guide to Biblical Palestine, 'Uncle Tom's Cabin', several bound volumes of religious magazines, 'The Adventures of a Penny', and sundry similar classics". With few books competing for his attention, he could freely concentrate on his favorite reading, "A set of twelve thick volumes of Cassell's 'History of England'".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Edwin Whitlock      Print: Book, Serial / periodical, but bound into volumes

  

[unknown] : [detective thrillers]

'Derek Davies could not recall that his mother had ever read a book. His father, a die-caster in an automobile factory, read only local and sports papers and two novels a week - a Western or a detective thriller: "Yet quite unintentionally he gave me... a love of reading... He never seemed to vary the diet, he never discussed either the books he read or newspaper items, and he never urged me to read for myself... I... was soon reading everything he read. by the age of eleven or twelve I must have read a couple of hundred of his novels..." In addition to the newspapers and his father's novels, he consumed books for younger children and travel books for adults ("Tibet, I remember, was one passionate preoccupation"). He jumped from the "Wizard" and "Hotspur", which his parents considered "trash" to their twenty-two bound volumes of "The Illustrated New History of the 1914-18 War". "Undeterred by the fact that I had neither the space nor the money to embark on even the most modest layout, I consumed book after book on the building of model railways. Gradually, as I found out how to use the School Library and the Public Library, some degree of selection took place, but as nobody at school before the sixth form advised me what to read the selection remained distinctly erratic... At about fourteen... I read every word of T.E. Lawrence's 'Seven Pillars of Wisdom', although I had only the faintest glimmer of its real significance".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Davies      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Western novels]

'Derek Davies could not recall that his mother had ever read a book. His father, a die-caster in an automobile factory, read only local and sports papers and two novels a week - a Western or a detective thriller: "Yet quite unintentionally he gave me... a love of reading... He never seemed to vary the diet, he never discussed either the books he read or newspaper items, and he never urged me to read for myself... I... was soon reading everything he read. by the age of eleven or twelve I must have read a coupe of hundred of his novels..." In addition to the newspapers and his father's novels, he consumed books for younger children and travel books for adults ("Tibet, I remember, was one passionate preoccupation"). He jumped from the "Wizard" and "Hotspur", which his parents considered "trash" to their twenty-two bound volumes of "The Illustrated New History of the 1914-18 War". "Undeterred by the fact that I had neither the space nor the money to embark on even the most modest layout, I consumed book after book on the building of model railways. Gradually, as I found out how to use the School Library and the Public Library, some degree of selection took place, but as nobody at school before the sixth form advised me what to read the selection remained distinctly erratic... At about fourteen... I read every word of T.E. Lawrence's 'Seven Pillars of Wisdom', although I had only the faintest glimmer of its real significance".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Davies      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Western novels]

'Derek Davies could not recall that his mother had ever read a book. His father, a die-caster in an automobile factory, read only local and sports papers and two novels a week - a Western or a detective thriller: "Yet quite unintentionally he gave me... a love of reading... He never seemed to vary the diet, he never discussed either the books he read or newspaper items, and he never urged me to read for myself... I... was soon reading everything he read. by the age of eleven or twelve I must have read a couple of hundred of his novels..." In addition to the newspapers and his father's novels, he consumed books for younger children and travel books for adults ("Tibet, I remember, was one passionate preoccupation"). He jumped from the "Wizard" and "Hotspur", which his parents considered "trash" to their twenty-two bound volumes of "The Illustrated New History of the 1914-18 War". "Undeterred by the fact that I had neither the space nor the money to embark on even the most modest layout, I consumed book after book on the building of model railways. Gradually, as I found out how to use the School Library and the Public Library, some degree of selection took place, but as nobody at school before the sixth form advised me what to read the selection remained distinctly erratic... At about fourteen... I read every word of T.E. Lawrence's 'Seven Pillars of Wisdom', although I had only the faintest glimmer of its real significance".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Derek Davies      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [detective thrillers]

'Derek Davies could not recall that his mother had ever read a book. His father, a die-caster in an automobile factory, read only local and sports papers and two novels a week - a Western or a detective thriller: "Yet quite unintentionally he gave me... a love of reading... He never seemed to vary the diet, he never discussed either the books he read or newspaper items, and he never urged me to read for myself... I... was soon reading everything he read. by the age of eleven or twelve I must have read a couple of hundred of his novels..." In addition to the newspapers and his father's novels, he consumed books for younger children and travel books for adults ("Tibet, I remember, was one passionate preoccupation"). He jumped from the "Wizard" and "Hotspur", which his parents considered "trash" to their twenty-two bound volumes of "The Illustrated New History of the 1914-18 War". "Undeterred by the fact that I had neither the space nor the money to embark on even the most modest layout, I consumed book after book on the building of model railways. Gradually, as I found out how to use the School Library and the Public Library, some degree of selection took place, but as nobody at school before the sixth form advised me what to read the selection remained distinctly erratic... At about fourteen... I read every word of T.E. Lawrence's 'Seven Pillars of Wisdom', although I had only the faintest glimmer of its real significance".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Derek Davies      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [children's books]

'Derek Davies could not recall that his mother had ever read a book. His father, a die-caster in an automobile factory, read only local and sports papers and two novels a week - a Western or a detective thriller: "Yet quite unintentionally he gave me... a love of reading... He never seemed to vary the diet, he never discussed either the books he read or newspaper items, and he never urged me to read for myself... I... was soon reading everything he read. by the age of eleven or twelve I must have read a couple of hundred of his novels..." In addition to the newspapers and his father's novels, he consumed books for younger children and travel books for adults ("Tibet, I remember, was one passionate preoccupation"). He jumped from the "Wizard" and "Hotspur", which his parents considered "trash" to their twenty-two bound volumes of "The Illustrated New History of the 1914-18 War". "Undeterred by the fact that I had neither the space nor the money to embark on even the most modest layout, I consumed book after book on the building of model railways. Gradually, as I found out how to use the School Library and the Public Library, some degree of selection took place, but as nobody at school before the sixth form advised me what to read the selection remained distinctly erratic... At about fourteen... I read every word of T.E. Lawrence's 'Seven Pillars of Wisdom', although I had only the faintest glimmer of its real significance".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Derek Davies      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [travel books, including some on Tibet]

'Derek Davies could not recall that his mother had ever read a book. His father, a die-caster in an automobile factory, read only local and sports papers and two novels a week - a Western or a detective thriller: "Yet quite unintentionally he gave me... a love of reading... He never seemed to vary the diet, he never discussed either the books he read or newspaper items, and he never urged me to read for myself... I... was soon reading everything he read. by the age of eleven or twelve I must have read a couple of hundred of his novels..." In addition to the newspapers and his father's novels, he consumed books for younger children and travel books for adults ("Tibet, I remember, was one passionate preoccupation"). He jumped from the "Wizard" and "Hotspur", which his parents considered "trash" to their twenty-two bound volumes of "The Illustrated New History of the 1914-18 War". "Undeterred by the fact that I had neither the space nor the money to embark on even the most modest layout, I consumed book after book on the building of model railways. Gradually, as I found out how to use the School Library and the Public Library, some degree of selection took place, but as nobody at school before the sixth form advised me what to read the selection remained distinctly erratic... At about fourteen... I read every word of T.E. Lawrence's 'Seven Pillars of Wisdom', although I had only the faintest glimmer of its real significance".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Derek Davies      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [account of Bounty mutiny]

[imaginative role play] 'One chauffeur's daughter alternated effortlessly between heroes and heroines: "I have plotted against pirates along with Jim Hawkins and I have trembled with Jane Eyre as the first Mrs Rochester rent her bridal veil in maddened jealousy. I have been shipwrecked with Masterman Ready and on Pitcairn Island with Fletcher Christian. I have been a medieval page in Sir Nigel and Lorna Doone madly in love with 'girt Jan Ridd'".

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Wharton      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Life of Scott]

'I have read a good many things, a life of Scott, the "Pleasures of Memory" by S. Rogers, Roman History and other things.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Sir Walter Raleigh      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [magazines]

'Gifford had read only some ballads, the black-letter romance Parismus and Parismenus, some odd loose magazines of his mother's, the Bible (which he studied with his grandmother) and "The Imitation of Christ" (read to his mother on her deathbed). He then learned algebra by surreptitiously reading Fenning's textbook: his master's son owned the book and had deliberately hidden it from him'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Gifford      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Faith Gray, dutiful member of a devout York evangelical family, self-accusingly notes in a review of the year 1768 a "strange mixture of Morality, History and Novels in my reading", but although she itemises some of the morality and history she is uninformative about the novels.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Faith Gray      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : John O' London's

'With autodidact diligence [Leslie Paul] closed in on the avant-garde. He read "Prufrock" and "The Waste Land", though not until the 1930s. He smuggled "Ulysses" and "Lady Chatterley's Lover" past customs. In "John O'London's" and "The Nation", in William MacDougall's Home University Library volume on "Psychology" and F.A. Servante's "Psychology of the Boy", he read up on Freud. In a few years he knew enough to ghost-write BBC lectures on modern psychology'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Leslie Paul      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [Russian literature]

'After Stalingrad, [Bernard Kops] immersed himself in Russian literature. A GI dating his sister introduced him to Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Bernard Kops      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'[Martin] suffered but little violent pain until the day he died. Up to that period he sought amusement in cheerful and entertaining books. A child of his landlady read to him as he lay upon a sofa, while he endeavoured to fancy himself, as he said, a gentleman of fashion paying the penalty of a debouch.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [French pocket dictionary]

'Upon one of the interminable book-stalls, or rather book-walls, which displayed their leafy barrens along the quays of the Seine, I picked up a Cobbett's French Grammar for a franc, and a pocket dictionnary for another. A fellow lodger lent me a Testament and a Telemaque; and to these materials I applied dogedly from six in the morning til dinnertime. I read the Grammar through first, and then made an abridgement of it on a small pack of plain cards... By these means ... I made rapid progress.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Manby Smith      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

[Smith describes evening activities while working as the private printer of Dr D.] 'Sometimes I played dices with madam - sometimes I read aloud from some work of history of philosophy selected by the Doctor.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Manby Smith      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [prayer book]

'Then we met in-doors for supper, with the home-made loaf and the cambray cheese; and then came the old family Bible and the worn-out ... prayer-book, and the ... voice of my good old dad, as he read deliberately the psalms and the prayer as in the days when I lay in my mother's lap while she soother little Ned to silence in her arms.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Smith      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [various titles]

'I was fond of reading when at home, but we had not an abundance of books; so as soon as I settled at Notting Hill, I often in the evening made my way to Oxford and other streets where I could find open bookshops, and in the course of a couple of years I had purchased and read a fair selection of our standard authors, and, as I shall mention in future pages, I became fairly well acquainted with the drama and the players. I am afraid I was rather more fond of the drama and works of fiction than of books of more general interest.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: William Tinsley      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [French novel]

'I also read again Silvio Pellico's "Prisons". I read it once at Granton- a lovely book (same edition) and "Adam Bede" and a French Novel and other new works. I like all Adam Bede immensely except the extremely inartistic plot. Geo. Eliot loves to draw self-righteious people with good instincts being led into crime or misery by circumstances.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Sir Walter Raleigh      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [dramatists' works]

'I spent the morning reading dramatists, to qualify myself to teach English Literature [...] while in the evening I read Walt Whitman's last book aloud to Alice, thus establishing myself as a (qualified) Whitmaniac.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Sir Walter Raleigh      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Roman History]

'I have read a good many things, a life of Scott, the "Pleasures of Memory" by S. Rogers, Roman History and other things.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Sir Walter Raleigh      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Last night I spent with Charles Strachey; we each had an arm chair with a chair between us to hold books as we passed judgment on them. I am sending you Stevenson's last book which came out a few days ago, which I bought and read this afternoon (I had a meddlesome red pencil with which I slightly disfigured it) and which I think spendidly spirited.' [followed by a judgment on the book]

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Sir Walter Raleigh      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : The History of England

'? with the exception of Bible lessons at Sunday school, all my reading was done at home, after the daily task was finished. When not strongly tempted to play I was almost certain to be reading by the summer?s twilight, or by the red embers of the winter's fire, my books being chiefly "Wesley?s Journals", "The Armenian Magazine", wherein I found "Maundrell?s Travels from Aleppo to Jerusalem", which I was very much interested by; "An account of the Inquisition in Spain", which filled me with a dislike of Popery"; "The Drummer of Tedworth"; "Some account of the Disturbances at Glenluce"; "An account of the Apparition of the Laird of Cool", - and other most marvellous narratives which excited my attention, and held me pausing over the ashes until the light was either gone or I was sent to bed. I also got hold of an old superstitious doctoring book, which gave me some unexpected information relative to the human frame, and equally surprised me as to the occult powers of certain herbs and simples, when prepared under supposed planetary aspects. A copy of Cocker?s "Arithmetic" soon after set me to writing figures and casting accounts, in which I made but slow progress; and part of a small volume of "The History of England", which I found in rumaging an old meal ark, gave me the first insight into the chronicles of my native country.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Bamford      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [religious books]

?during this winter I practised rather more than I had done before for the last two years for my master used to Read himself and make all as Could in the family on a Sabath [sic] evening and sometimes we were permitted to read Books of a religious nature as we sat by the fire side in the week day evenings but not always?.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Mayett      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [various]

?[my master] also was a good scholar and took great pains to teach me in reading and here I made a Considerable progress in reading for although I had heedlessly neglected learning yet I had not lost my taste for it nor forgot the importance of it?.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Mayett      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

?here I was stationed in a half Room that is half the men of our Company, and half of another Company and there was a man whose name was Samuel winwright a man of the other company in the Room with me and he was a good Scholar and he undertook to learn me to Read in a better tone of voice than I had attained too and to keep my points and stops for I had never learned them before?.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Mayett      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [stories]

'About this time I also gained the good-will of an aged woman who sold cakes, sweetmeals, and fruit, and was moreover a dealer in little books...I had even then a taste for reading which was here qualified by me being permitted to read all the little stories which she kept on sale. They were, in truth, childish trifles, but I still think of them with pleasure because they were associated in my case with many pleasant recollections.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : History of England

'In this way I beguiled many a tedious hour at the time I am now referring to, and also during several years following, towards the close of which I thus contrived to read "Robinson Crusoe" and a brief "History of England", with some other books whose titles I do not now remember. The books that first fell in my way, besides those that belonged to my parents, were few and of little worth.'

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : The Assembly's Catechism

'Once in each week we were required to commit to memory a rather large portion of "The Assembly's Catechism": this for a time gave me some trouble, which put me upon making several experiments in order to see whether I could not lessen it. After a failure or two, I hit upon a plan which fully answered my purpose: the time for repeating this lesson was Saturday morning...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : History of England

'I had been made the more anxious to get some spare time, because several books which I had not before seen now fall in my way. This was through the courtesy of my young master whose kindly feelings I have already noticed. He now gave me free acess to his little library, in which were Enfield's "Speaker", Goldsmith's "Geography", an abridged "History of Rome", a "History of England", Thomson's "Seasons", "The Citizen of the World", "The Vicar of Wakefield", and some other books the titles of which I do not now remember. These books furnished me with a large amount of amusing and instructive reading.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : History of Rome

'I had been made the more anxious to get some spare time, because several books which I had not before seen now fell in my way. This was through the courtesy of my young master whose kindly feelings I have already noticed. He now gave me free access to his little library, in which were Enfield's "Speaker", Goldsmith's "Geography", an abridged "History of Rome", a "History of England", Thomson's "Seasons", "The Citizen of the World", "The Vicar of Wakefield", and some other books the titles of which I do not now remember. These books furnished me with a large amount of amusing and instructive reading.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I, moreover, found my Sunday pursuits and amusements to be powerfully instrumental in cheering and elevating my "inner man"... That I might make the day as long as possible, I rose early: if the mornings were at all fine, I walked in the adjacent fields where I found ample amusement in either reading the book of nature or some humbler volume, without which I took care never [last word underlined] to go out on these excursions.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [volumes by the British Essayists]

'It was at this time that I read the remaining seven volumes of the "Spectator"; to which I added the "Rambler", the "Tatler", and some others of the "British Essayists". I also read the poetical works of Milton, Addison, Goldsmith, Gray, Collins, Falconer, Pomfret, Akenside, Mrs. Rowe, with others which I cannot now clearly call to mind. I remember, however, to have read Gay's poems. These gave me more than usual satisfaction. I was much amused with his "Trivia, or the Art of Walking London Streets" but I was especially pleased with his admirably burlesque "pastorals". These just squared with my humour, for I had then, as I have ever had, an utter dislike to the sickening stuff that is called the pastoral poetry...I must not omit to mention the pleasure I derived from reading a poem called "The Village Curate", which, I think, has fallen into unmerited oblivion.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book, Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [various]

'After all my contrivances I found but little convenience for reading, except on the Sunday. I always kept a book in my pocket, that it might be at hand in case I should find a few spare minutes. In general, I managed to read a few pages while going to and from the workshop. This, however, was a somewhat difficult affair, as my path led me through some of the busiest streets and places in the city: and I hardly need say that these are not the most favourable localities for a thoughtful reader, especially if what he chooses to read demands any thing like close attention. It was while standing at a bookstall that I read with the most advantage. I took care to avail myself of this as often, and for as long a time as possible; and from these out-of-door libraries picked up a few - perhaps a good many - scraps of useful or amusing information.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Letters on the Marriage State

'I read a volume which was called "The Guide to Domestic Happiness", but found that it had no direct bearing upon the case of a working man - all its reasonings, counsels, and encouragements being based on upon the supposition of the reader's being a person of substance and education. the only publication I met with which at all came up to my wishes was one called "Letters on the Marriage State"; but even this bore only in a distant way upon the case in question.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [History of the recent wars]

'When [winter] was over, I began to steal a few moments occasionally for the purpose of looking upon the fair and sweet face of nature. It was at this time, I think, that I read Mr. Rogers's very beautiful poem called "Human Life" and also a history of the recent wars.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : The lives of the Stoics

?This period gave me unnumbered hours for reading, and I devoured everything that came in my way, novels, histories, travels, even "The lives of the Stoics". There was no such thing as a free library then, so enough money was scraped up for a subscription one, the first volume borrowed being Dickens?s newly published "Bleak House".?

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Catling      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown various titles]

?This period gave me unnumbered hours for reading, and I devoured everything that came in my way, novels, histories, travels, even "The lives of the Stoics". There was no such thing as a free library then, so enough money was scraped up for a subscription one, the first volume borrowed being Dickens?s newly published "Bleak House".?

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Catling      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [theological works]

?My father, as before stated, was a reader, and amongst other books which he now read, was Pain?s [sic] "Rights of Men". He also read Pain?s [sic] "Age of Reason", and his other theological works, but they made not the least alterations in his religious opinions.?

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Daniel Bamford      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [works on travel and antiquities]

?As spring and autumn were our only really busy seasons, I had occasionally , during other parts of the year, considerable leisure, which, if I could procure a book that I considered at all worth the reading, was spent with such a book of my desk, in the little recess of the packing room. Here, therefore, I had opportunities for reading many books of which I had only heard the names before, such as Robertson?s "History of Scotland", Goldsmith?s "History of England", Rollin?s "Ancient History", Hume?s "Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire", Anachaises? "Travels in Greece"; and many other works on travels, geography, and antiquities.?

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Bamford      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Life of General Washington

'In my hours of leisure I read the works of Mr Charles Lamb, Mr Holcroft's memoirs, and the "Life of General Washington".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [various]

?Two or three years my senior, Sam, like myself, was acquiring a taste for books. Our tastes were not wholly dissimilar. Both of us read and enjoyed poetry; but while Sam?s more solid reading was in science, especially in astronomy and geology, mine was in history, biography, logic, languages, oratory, and general literature. Sam?s favourite books at this time were Alison?s "History of Europe" and Humboldt?s "Cosmos".?

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Bailey      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [various]

?Two or three years my senior, Sam, like myself, was acquiring a taste for books. Our tastes were not wholly dissimilar. Both of us read and enjoyed poetry; but while Sam?s more solid reading was in science, especially in astronomy and geology, mine was in history, biography, logic, languages, oratory, and general literature. Sam?s favourite books at this time were Alison?s "History of Europe" and Humboldt?s "Cosmos".?

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Burt      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [theological magazines]

?For stories, anecdotes, for something lively and telling, I ransacked my father?s theological magazines, with but small success. Two books of his, however, I found greatly helpful. Todd?s "Student?s Manual" and an odd volume on Channing?s works. The "Manual" was a handy little book, full of useful links and suggestions on reading, writing and study. Still more hopeful and inspiring was Channing. That such an author should be in my father?s possession in those days was in itself remarkable? This volume of Channing, which so profited and delighted me, contained essays on Milton, Napoleon and F?nelon. These I read with attention; more than once I read them ? that on Milton many times over. The style took my fancy. Compared, indeed, with the great masters of English prose, the critic would no doubt detect failings not a few in Channing. But I was not a critic; and the clear, easy, simple words, the rhythmic phrases, pleased my ear, while the sentiments always pure, generous, lofty ? impressed me heart and understanding.?

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Burt      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : Life of Pope Sixtus V

'At this time to amuse myself in my confinement I read the "Life of Pope Sixtus 5th." w'ch Miss Poole ... lent me. My son John Marsh showing and inclination to read this (who had before seldom evinced much taste for reading) I told him that as the book was borrow'd by Miss Poole he must get thro' it much faster than he did books in general, of w'ch a very few pages at a time... used to satisfy him. This book however, seem'd to catch his attention & he soon got through it, since w'ch time tho' he has never become a thorough reader, he has continued much more of one than he ever was before.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Marsh      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Life of Pope Sixtus V

'At this time to amuse myself in my confinement I read the "Life of Pope Sixtus 5th." w'ch Miss Poole ... lent me. My son John Marsh showing and inclination to read this (who had before seldom evinced much taste for reading) I told him that as the book was borrow'd by Miss Poole he must get thro' it much faster than he did books in general, of w'ch a very few pages at a time... used to satisfy him. This book however, seem'd to catch his attention & he soon got through it, since w'ch time tho' he has never become a thorough reader, he has continued much more of one than he ever was before.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Marsh      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [various]

'As to Mrs M & I, we have been, ever since we lived at Nethersole, great readers, taking each always a book at breakfast & at tea when without company in the house & also for some time after dinner & supper, by w'ch means we each read about 2 hours or make everyday our young men likewise taking their books at the same time, ... except after supper on days when we had been visiting, or at the Concert, the talking over which afterwards generally furnish'd amusement for the remainder of the evening.'

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Marsh      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [various]

'As to Mrs M & I, we have been, ever since we lived at Nethersole, great readers, taking each always a book at breakfast & at tea when without company in the house & also for some time after dinner & supper, by w'ch means we each read about 2 hours or make everyday our young men likewise taking their books at the same time, ... except after supper on days when we had been visiting, or at the Concert, the talking over which afterwards generally furnish'd amusement for the remainder of the evening.'

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Marsh      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [a novel]

'I rode to Brighton on my way back, where I spent the evening and slept at the Old Ship, amusing myself besides my novel, with going on with some of the draught or rough sketch of this history...'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Marsh      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [various titles]

'... at the end of my fourth year I drew a small weekly salary one half of which my father allowed me for my own use... I bought books, and read as much as possible, and reflected upon what I read while engaged in my daily avocations.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Manby Smith      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [various]

[Smith joins a reading group of seven with a view to self-improvement] 'We got a good room, with such attendance as we required, at the sum above named; and thus, for sixpence a week each, with an additional three-halfpence in winter time for firing, we had an imperfect, it is true, but still an efficient means of improvement at our command. Here we met nearly three hundred nights in the year, and talked, read, disputed and wrote "de omnibus rebus et quibusdam aliis" until the clock struck eleven.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Manby Smith      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [various]

'"My books" - I have a few of my own - pick up a loom where it can be had; so of course my reading is without choice or system.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Thom      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [religious books]

'... April when we marched to Mansfield here I met with a man who was a member of Johannah Southcott Society and he lent me some of his books and told me many straing things So that I began to be taken with his devices but by his books I found some things that did not Correspond with the Bible and also that it was a trick to get money so I declined his religeon and bid him adue.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Mayett      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [religious tracts]

'My father was likewise very fond of reading; he now proposed to encourage my love of books, by entering me a subscriber to one of the circulating libraries. I had the pleasure of being my father's instructor in reading and writing, and this kind offer to procure me books was a high reward for so doing - previously, I had great difficulty in getting books to read, except the tracks and magazines supplied by the chapel libraries and Sunday school teachers.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Christopher Thomson      Print: Book, Broadsheet, tracts

  

[unknown] : [religious magazines]

'My father was likewise very fond of reading; he now proposed to encourage my love of books, by entering me a subscriber to one of the circulating libraries. I had the pleasure of being my father's instructor in reading and writing, and this kind offer to procure me books was a high reward for so doing - previously, I had great difficulty in getting books to read, except the tracks and magazines supplied by the chapel libraries and Sunday school teachers.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Christopher Thomson      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

[description of work while employed as an apprentice at the warehouse of Mr Tait, proprietor of 'Tait's Edinburgh Magazine'] 'This accomplished, my next duties were to sweep the floor and dust the counter and desks in the front shop, in the course of which an occasional brief pause on my work was made that I might take a peep at the contents of some book, the title of which took my fancy.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: James Glass Bertram      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [various English periodicals]

'At the beginning of each month, too, there fell to be collected from the various agents a large number of English magazines for Mr Tait's customers, as also a few copies of "Blackwood"; and at the contents of some of those I often contrived to get a surreptitious "read".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: James Glass Bertram      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine

'In the evening read the Newspaper and an article on Renan in "Blackwood"'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : Canti Carnascialeschi

'This week I have read a satire of Juvenal, some of Cicero's "De Officiis", part of Epictetus' Enchiridion, two cantos of Pulci, part of the Canti Carnascialeschi, and finished Manni's Veglie Piacevole, besides looking up various things in the classical antquities and peeping into Theocritus'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [chronicle of conquest of the Morea]

'Looked at the chronicle of the conquest of the Morea yesterday, and into Finlay's "History of Medieval Greece".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Seraphime

'G. finished reading "Seraphime" aloud to me'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Henry Lewes      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [books on plants]

'I am reading about plants, and Helmholtz on music'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Ancient Geography

'Read the articles Phoenicia and Carthage in Ancient Geography. Looked into Smith's "Universal History" again for Carthaginian religion. Looked into Sismondi's "Litterature du Midi", for Roman de Rose, and ran through the first chapter, about the formation of the Romance Languages. Read about the Thallogens and Acrogens in "the Vegetable World". Drayton's Nymphidia - a charming poem. A few pages of his Polyolbion. Re-read Grote v-vii on Sicilian affairs down to rise of Dionysius'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Vegetable World, The

'Read the articles Phoenicia and Carthage in Ancient Geography. Looked into Smith's "Universal History" again for Carthaginian religion. Looked into Sismondi's "Litterature du Midi", for Roman de Rose, and ran through the first chapter, about the formation of the Romance Languages. Read about the Thallogens and Acrogens in "the Vegetable World". Drayton's Nymphidia - a charming poem. A few pages of his Polyolbion. Re-read Grote v-vii on Sicilian affairs down to rise of Dionysius'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [on Charles Fourier and Robert Owen, Utopian Socialists]

'I read about Fourier and Owen'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : The Grave

'It was in this state of feeling that I first got hold of a little volume called "The Wreath", containing a collection of poems by various authors. Among these pieces was "The Grave", which soon commended itself to my hearty and unqualified approbation...Besides this poem the volume contained "The Minstrel", of which I venture to say that I consider it to be of almost unequalled beauty and interest... There was here yet another poem which arrested my attention as fully as much as did "The Grave" or "The Minstrel". This was entitled "Death" - a prize winning poem written by that eminently good man Dr Porteus...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : The Minstrel

'It was in this state of feeling that I first got hold of a little volume called "The Wreath", containing a collection of poems by various authors. Among these pieces was "The Grave", which soon commended itself to my hearty and unqualified approbation...Besides this poem the volume contained "The Minstrel", of which I venture to say that I consider it to be of almost unequalled beauty and interest... There was here yet another poem which arrested my attention as fully as much as did "The Grave" or "The Minstrel". This was entitled "Death" - a prize winning poem written by that eminently good man Dr Porteus...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Liverpool newspaper: squib on Matthew Arnold]

'Of course you have seen the squib on him in the "Examiner" ("Mr Sampson"). I saw it in a Liverpool paper. One sees him in almost every newspaper now. "D. News" rapped his knuckles a month since... and I see the "Times" did it yesterday'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Print: Newspaper

  

[unknown] : Daily News (comment on Matthew Arnold)

'Of course you have seen the squib on him in the "Examiner" ("Mr Sampson"). I saw it in a Liverpool paper. One sees him in almost every newspaper now. "D. News" rapped his knuckles a month since... and I see the "Times" did it yesterday'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Print: Newspaper

  

[unknown] : The Times (comment on Matthew Arnold)

'Of course you have seen the squib on him in the "Examiner" ("Mr Sampson"). I saw it in a Liverpool paper. One sees him in almost every newspaper now. "D. News" rapped his knuckles a month since... and I see the "Times" did it yesterday'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Print: Newspaper

  

[unknown] : [30 vol. History of 'Conjurazioni]

[Letter from Byron to Annabella Milbanke, Aug 25th 1814]. 'You can hardly have a better modern work than Sismondi's, but he has since published another on the Literature of Italy, Spain &c., which I would willingly recommend... on my return to London I would gladly forward it... Gibbon is well worth a hundred perusals. Watson's Philip of Spain, and Coxe's Spain and Austria are dry enough; but there is some advantage to be extracted even from them. Vertot's Revolutions (but writes not history but romance). The best thing of that kind I met by accident at Athens in a Convent Library in old and not "very choice Italian". I forget the title - but it was a history in some thirty tomes of all Conjurazioni whatsoever from Catiline's down to Count Fiesco of Lavagna's in Genoa and Braganza's in Lisbon. I read it through (having nothing else to read) & having nothing to compare it withal, thought it perfection'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon, Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read all evening'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Greek Grammar]

'Read in the greek grammar'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read and work in the evening'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read in the morning and work'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Greek Grammar]

'Read in the Greek grammar'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Greek Grammar]

'Read a little in the Greek grammar'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Work and read in the evening'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Write and read'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [descriptions of the West Indies]

'Read some descriptions of West Indies.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Cole      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Account of the Tailor Bird]

'Read acct of the "Tailor Bird".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Cole      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Den golden spiegel

To Miss Hunt, St Winifred's Dale, August 18 1793

'I admire the German you sent me extremely. I have read none since you left me, except two books of Dr Randolph's "Den Golden Spiegel", which is an imitation of an Eastern tale, by way of making dissertations upon government. It is entertaining and there is an account of a happy valley, that makes one long to live in it. The other book is Wiessen's Poems (Lyrische Gedischte) some of which are very pretty.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Smith      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'When Mrs Hinde (the Old Lady) would sometimes talk to her about Books, she?d cry out, "Prithee don?t talk to me about books?as I never read any Books, but men & Cards"?But let any Body read [ital] her [close ital] Book; & then tell me, if she did not draw Characters with as masterly a hand as Sr Joshua Reynolds. "Go thou and do likewise."'

Century: 1600-1699 / 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Sarah Churchill      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [old-fashioned theological works]

'As my love of books became known, I was made free of such libraries as the neighbours possessed which led to me reading some curious and unsuitable matter, old-fashioned theological works, early Methodist magazines, cookery books and queer tales of murder and robbery. One such, entitled "The Castle of Otranto", haunted my dreams for many a night. Our nearest neighbour who was more of a scholar than his rough exterior and taciturn manner suggested, lent me a "History of England" which was a veritable godsend.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Hannah Mitchell      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [early Methodist magazines]

'As my love of books became known, I was made free of such libraries as the neighbours possessed which led to me reading some curious and unsuitable matter, old-fashioned theological works, early Methodist magazines, cookery books and queer tales of murder and robbery. One such, entitled "The Castle of Otranto", haunted my dreams for many a night. Our nearest neighbour who was more of a scholar than his rough exterior and taciturn manner suggested, lent me a "History of England" which was a veritable godsend.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Hannah Mitchell      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [cookery books]

'As my love of books became known, I was made free of such libraries as the neighbours possessed which led to me reading some curious and unsuitable matter, old-fashioned theological works, early Methodist magazines, cookery books and queer tales of murder and robbery. One such, entitled "The Castle of Otranto", haunted my dreams for many a night. Our nearest neighbour who was more of a scholar than his rough exterior and taciturn manner suggested, lent me a "History of England" which was a veritable godsend.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Hannah Mitchell      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [tales of murder and robbery]

'As my love of books became known, I was made free of such libraries as the neighbours possessed which led to me reading some curious and unsuitable matter, old-fashioned theological works, early Methodist magazines, cookery books and queer tales of murder and robbery. One such, entitled "The Castle of Otranto", haunted my dreams for many a night. Our nearest neighbour who was more of a scholar than his rough exterior and taciturn manner suggested, lent me a "History of England" which was a veritable godsend.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Hannah Mitchell      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : History of England

'As my love of books became known, I was made free of such libraries as the neighbours possessed which led to me reading some curious and unsuitable matter, old-fashioned theological works, early Methodist magazines, cookery books and queer tales of murder and robbery. One such, entitled "The Castle of Otranto", haunted my dreams for many a night. Our nearest neighbour who was more of a scholar than his rough exterior and taciturn manner suggested, lent me a "History of England" which was a veritable godsend.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Hannah Mitchell      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Adam's First Wife

'In another house I found a tattered copy of Scott's "Kenilworth" and a quite new copy of "Cranford". Among some old books in my grandmother's cottage I found a curious one entitled "Adam's First Wife". This was a sort of history of the Garden of Eden which rather discounted the "rib theory" and raised some doubt in my mind as to Adam's innocence in the pre-apple days.' [continuation of discussion of Adam etc]

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Hannah Mitchell      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [poetry]

'I also found a small library, which meant that many copper really needed for food were spent on borrowing books. At this time I read all Mrs. Henry Wood's novels, most of Sir Walter Scott's works along with a good deal of poetry and history, as well as a good deal of rubbish I daresay. But as I have forgotten it it did me no harm.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Hannah Mitchell      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [history]

'I also found a small library, which meant that many copper really needed for food were spent on borrowing books. At this time I read all Mrs. Henry Wood's novels, most of Sir Walter Scott's works along with a good deal of poetry and history, as well as a good deal of rubbish I daresay. But as I have forgotten it it did me no harm.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Hannah Mitchell      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [To our trusty and well beloved Hannah Maria Mitchell]

'Subsequently I recieved a curiously worded scroll addressed to "Our trusty and well beloved Hannah Maria Mitchell." This document would hardly find favour with the advocates of Basic English - there are no stops or commas in it. It begins with "Greeting. Know ye that we have assigned you and every one of you jointly and severally Our Justices to keep the peace in and throughout our city of Manchester in our County Palatine of Lancaster and to keep and cause to be kept all Ordinaces and Statues made for the good of our peace and for the Conservation of the same." Then followed the instructions - "to chastise and punish all persons that offend against the form of these ordinaces. To cause to come before you or any of you all those who to anyone or more of Our People concerning their bodies or the firing of their houses have used threats to find sufficient security for the Peace if they shall refuse to find such Securtiy then them in our prisons until they shall find such security to cause to be safely kept." The scroll ends with the command - "that you diligently apply yourselves to the keeping Our Peace Ordinance Statutes and all and signular other the premises and perform and fulfil the same in form aforesaid being therein what to Justice appertaineth according to the Laws and Customs of England."'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hannah Mitchell      Manuscript: Sheet

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

Sunday, Feb 4 (1940) 'Rose late. 11 o'clock. Breakfast. Went out to shovel snow off paths. Stayed in all day, reading, writing, etc. Thank goodness snow seems to be thawing.'

Unknown
Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      

  

[unknown] : [life of Joan of Arc]

'It was quite a thousand pages and they laughed at me for reading it. It was dry, but I could really live the life of that girl.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'1.45. Paddington. All seats crowded, people eating, sleeping, reading, on seats and porters' trucks. Looking at Arrival Indicator, woman says "Trains not a bit late yet, the organization's wonderful!" People generally not talking about the Coronation but about trains, food, drinks, relatives, etc.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [crime novel]

'I find myself between a well-to-do business man from the Midlands, who is reading a "crime" novel, and two good-looking twins who are speaking a language like Danish and are learning English words from a Pitman's book.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Pitman's book

'I find myself between a well-to-do business man from the Midlands, who is reading a "crime" novel, and two good-looking twins who are speaking a language like Danish and are learning English words from a Pitman's book. '

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [pamphlet]

'Walking back to lunch I met an old lady wheeling another old lady in a bath-chair, and heard the one in the bath-chair reading aloud slowly from the leaflet I had been distributing: "Speed-up in Industry: 5 men now do the work that it took 6 men to do in 1932".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Hostess is embroidering a fire-screen. Son, age 19, is reading. The wireless is on, and from time to time they consult the "Daily Telegraph Supplement"; host offers Observer a sweet but by mistake holds out bird's peanut tin.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'On Coronation Day we had a holiday so I thought I would have a rest and so I stayed in bed all the morning reading.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : A Guide to philosophy

'About 10.30 p.m. I took her for some refreshment, we talked of books, she said she was reading "A Guide to Philosophy", I made some laudatory remarks about "Eyeless in Gaza".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [sensational novel]

'...the inside of the lid of it was lined with sheets of what I now know to have been a sensational novel. It was of course a fragment, but I read it, kneeling on the bare floor, with indescribable rapture.' [and more for a paragraph..]

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Edmund Gosse      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Carpentier's life

'D. Did you ever read Carpentier's life, I've been reading it in a illustrated paper, 'e thought 'e was on a easy thing 'e never trained. Battling Siki knocked everything out of 'im.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: unknown      Print: Newspaper, Serial / periodical, illustrated paper

  

[unknown] : [pamphlet]

'When one has finished reading through this pamphlet one comes to the inevit- able conclusion that there is absolutely no hope for Germany.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      

  

[unknown] : [copy books]

?Dear Sir, if you had condescended to write a few lines with these copy Books I should have had greater pleasure in reading them at present I cannot even guess what they are or why you sent them to me. I should have conceived basing[?] a few hard words that it was one of the stories I wrote some fifteen years ago ? as it bears all the marks of that work of premature genius which some romantic children have - & which seldom I think does them any other service than to lead them headlong into love & folly before the usual time I should say it was the production of what Sir Moore properly defines a Girl of Genius unless perchance it is the school effusion of some boy of that sort ? it is very clever, very original in parts ? very imitative in others and tho the whole thing occasioned by having either read some poetry or seen some play that has filled the Authors[sic] head ? with mystery ? wildness & extravagance ? if it is to be published it must of course be reread & rewritten - & if you knew how sick I was of ?Moments of Gloom? mysterious personages ??care worn brows" marble hearts - & the whole of that which deceived me & many others, you would never send me any think of the sort I think however seriously this that if the person who wrote this be young & inexperienced, they will soon write very well & must be very clever. if they be at their best ? I donot [sic] much admire them?

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Caroline Lamb      Manuscript: Copy Books

  

[unknown] : Review of Glenarvon in the Augustan Review

'do you ever read the Augustan Review it is stupid though[underlined] it thinks me so - & yet be afraid I like it because it takes[?] the thing [Glenarvon] fairly & not as real characters[.] have you ever heard what he [presumably Lord Byron] said to Glenarvon ? I burn to know?

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Caroline Lamb      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : Sketch

'ELLEN: looks up from the "Sketch", which she has been reading: "How do you pronounce M-Y-R-R-H"?'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Ellen      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'It is a bitterly cold evening, towards the end of February. The fire is very low, and at the moment is rather smothered by small coal and slack. Miss V. is sitting over it, reading. Mr. T. comes in, dressed in Home Guard uniform, and rubbing his hands together.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Miss V      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Whereas Kay was always trying to read or knit when she sat down, Louise is doing nothing at all, and so can be quite undisturbed by the constant clawing of sticky hands round her knees.'

Unknown
Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Kay      

  

[unknown] : [English novel]

'The English student said that he had read an English novel in which a similar idea was suggested. One German was very much annoyed at hearing that the idea had been put forward in England, and said that it was a great mistake to give the enemy warning.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Low Company

'D. went. N. said he wasn't going to sleep, because it was too uncomfortable; would read a book. He read "Low Company", while I read the first chapter of Silone's "Bread and Wine".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group:      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Also told me he had been commissioned to write a history of Dudley a few days back. Had declined. We went back and read until 12 o'clock.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'6.30-8 p.m. read. 8 p.m. supper. 9 p.m. bath and bed. I saw nothing stirring or peculiar. The only funny thing was the name of a row of houses, Amble Tonia.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : Poesie di Ossian

[Item transcribed into a commonplace book]: [Title] 'Poesie di Ossian [by] Cartoue'; [Text] 'O tu che luminoso erri e rotundo/ ...'; [total = 37 lines]

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Magdalene Sharpe- Erskine      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I prepare supper and we eat it. Listen to news. I continue to read.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'At half past two I was dry, and eating the remnants of my lunch. I switched on the wireless and listened to the Coronation ceremony. When this had finished I read a book till seven o'clock when my father came home.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'To attempt to describe either their dresses or persons would be only to repeat some of the many accounts of them that have already been published, as every one has been written by people who had much better opportunities of seeing them, and more time to examine them than I have had. Indeed, a man need go no farther to study them than the China paper, the better sorts of which represent their persons, and such of their customs, dresses, etc., as I have seen, most strikingly like, though a little in the "caricatura" style. Indeed, some of the plants which are common to China and Java, as bamboo, are better figured there than in the best botanical authors that I have seen.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Banks      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [news bulletin]

'"I've been calm all week, but yesterday I listened to the news bulletin and I got a bad dose of jitters. I read somewhere that they're going to move London to Canada, and I can well believe it."'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Newspaper, Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Oh, I have strained my eyes trying to read, and had to give it up in the end. I call it dismal, sitting for half an hour or more in a dark, gloomy carriage, so's you can't read; can't even look at the girls sitting opposite you; can't see your station. That's not going to keep us cheerful and "bring us victory," is it?'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [thrillers]

'Well, I took it because it's a thriller. That's the reason. I like thrillers, you see. I always read thrillers.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [newspapers]

'Course I know what you're talking about, I read about it all in the paper, used to read books about it, they've made a new car so's it's easier to drive, more profit for them isn't it, like Lord Nuffield. Wireless is all right though.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Newspaper

  

[unknown] : [newspaper?]

'Never thought much about it, took it for granted. One thing it's done is make people's nerves on edge all the time, wars and all that, get sick of it. . . . Pictures you get used to, they're all the same. . . . You can get about easier. . . . I don't blame them as finds things out, it's them as is let use the things wot they find out. . . . I read a bit about that new car, don't know what it means though. They're always finding things out now. All right if we knew how to use them, first thing they do is to put men on the shelf before they're grown up. . . . Sometimes think if they had a rest from thinking how they can make more money out of us-that's what they do it for.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [horoscopes]

'I read them every Sunday, many a time it's been true, but they don't give you so much bad news. When it was my birthday they said I should get a surprise. I got one. It was a good 'un, mister. No, I'm not telling you what it was, that's my business.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Newspaper, Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : Long ago!

[Item transcribed into a commonplace book]: [Title] 'Long ago!'; [Text] 'Long ago!` Oh long ago!/ Do not these words recall past years?/ And scarcely knowing why they flow/ Bring to the eye unbidden tears?/ ...' [total = 4 x 8 line verses]

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Anon      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : Royal Academy Catalogue

'I was invited on one occasion to Mr Champley's, in Newborough, where I saw a specimen of Etty's peculiar painting in the portrait of Mr Champley himself; and looked over the Royal Academy Catalogue and there found several of his productions enumerated; one I copied; this is it 235 Bridge of Sighs' [catalogue entry follows, approx 120 words].

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Cole      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [album]

'On the circular table in the centre of the room was placed among other books an album, and Mr Storey being called away, I noted the following excellent morsels of literature: "It is a good rule that our conversation should rather be of things than of persons: for thus obvious reason, that things have not a character to lose." "To take sunshine pleasure in the blessings and excellencies of others is a much surer mask of benevolence than pity their calamities".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Cole      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [sermons]

'After tea walked home, and went through, with my family, our usual Sunday evening devotions, consisting of sermon reading and prayers.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Cole      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [explanation of the principles of the Christian religion]

'Every Sunday after breakfast the Bishop of Norwich reads to their Royal Highnesses a practical explanation of the principles of the Christian religion'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Prince George      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [thrillers]

'I like reading. I can sit down and read a good thriller and start on it again immediately I have finished it, but nothing else ... As I've tried to explain I can't find the time. When I've come home from work, helped the wife, and had a smoke, you look round, and it's time to go to bed.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I do like reading, and I spend most of the evening reading because there's nowhere to go.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Well, yes, but not good reading. I only read to pass the time away, - any old thing; any time when I happen to be stuck for an hour or so.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'25 C was reading a book, waiting to be served, and reading with concentration, both elbows on table, head between hands. When served with pot of tea and a bun, continued to read, eating and drinking absently. At 5 o'c looked up, gazed round cafe for two minutes, lit a cigarette, asked for bill. Started to read again, but more casually, glancing round cafe from time to time. Left at 5.5. p.m'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : His Ice Queen

'In her spare time she was a great reader of novelettes and out of her four shillings subscribed to "Bow Bells" and the "Family Herald". Once when Laura, coming home from school, happened to overtake her, she enlivened the rest of the journey with the synopsis of a serial she was reading, called "His Ice Queen"'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Flora Thompson      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [books]

'That I don't like refugees in fiction is perhaps easy to understand, but I don't even like the war and today's conditions ("Murder in the Home Guard" and similar titles) to figure in my novels..... In the greater part of my reading I have just the opposite taste; I read mostly books dealing with the questions of today and tomorrow. But I can't stand any of it in fiction. Funny isn't it?'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [detective novels]

'Detective stories and thrillers are by far the most numerous, in fact at the moment are all the fiction I seem to read... After reading them I always wonder why I read them and if I once pause and examine the profusion of adjectives I am almost compelled to stop.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Guide to Edinburgh

'Oh, I read the reviews in the "Sunday Times" and the "Times Literary Supplement", when I can get hold of it. I also read the book reviews in "John O' London's". Quite often I get interested in a book and this leads me on to reading more about the subject. For instance, I read the "Guide to Edinburgh" and that introduced me to James IV period, and then I read all about that. Other times I just glance at the title and open the book, and by reading a few lines at random I get some idea of the book, and if it interests me I'll take it out.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [books on James IV]

'Oh, I read the reviews in the "Sunday Times" and the "Times Literary Supplement", when I can get hold of it. I also read the book reviews in "John O' London's". Quite often I get interested in a book and this leads me on to reading more about the subject. For instance, I read the "Guide to Edinburgh" and that introduced me to James IV period, and then I read all about that. Other times I just glance at the title and open the book, and by reading a few lines at random I get some idea of the book, and if it interests me I'll take it out.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [novels]

'Novels, except of exceptional quality, I prefer to borrow as I read them, mainly for relaxation only and seldom wish to read the same book a second time, as my choice is usually very light. When I find a novel which appeals strongly. I buy it because I know I shall find pleasure in re-reading it.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [books]

'Oh, I read the reviews in the "Sunday Times" and the "Times Literary Supplement", when I can get hold of it. I also read the book reviews in "John O' London's". Quite often I get interested in a book and this leads me on to reading more about the subject. For instance, I read the "Guide to Edinburgh" and that introduced me to James IV period, and then I read all about that. Other times I just glance at the title and open the book, and by reading a few lines at random I get some idea of the book, and if it interests me I'll take it out.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [novels]

'Novels, except of exceptional quality, I prefer to borrow as I read them, mainly for relaxation only and seldom wish to read the same book a second time, as my choice is usually very light. When I find a novel which appeals strongly. I buy it because I know I shall find pleasure in re-reading it.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Have breakfast (next real interval is tea time, so breakfast includes prayers, reading and any urgent letters - this morning one short letter); listen to 7 a.m. news summary.'

Unknown
Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I was reading the other day the story of an air flight. They had a long and dangerous journey to undertake, and before they set out, they made a list of the things they needed. But when they were ready to go, the plane was too heavy. They jettisioned much, but still they could not take off. They had to whittle down to a bare minimum. But they did not throw out a single pint of patrol.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After breakfast I postponed the things I ought to do by a little reading and knitting. Then I wrote letters till lunch. Continued this after lunch - this comes of refusing to write letters except on Sundays.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown - on Higher criticism]

'Many thanks for the cuttings on higher criticism. I can't help thinking that this movement is larely the result of trying to reduce (as I tried to do a few days ago!) Christianity to a comprehensible, logical system of ethics, rather than trying to realize that wonderful communion with God which must always be its source of faith, hope, love, and strength. 'Religion would cease to be divine if it were capable of being compressed into the narrow limits of human comprehension; isn't that right? 'I am afraid I greatly prefer Dr Dale's book to Bishop Westcott's. It is so much easier to understand. Westcott is very well for Sundays, but rather exacting for a tired week-day brain! 'The Bishop has returned from the Seychelles and is acting as our chaplin. He is a peculiar man, but I believe he is a very good one. 'I am, your affectionate son. P.S. I find I have got a copy of Gore's Prayer and the Lord's Prayer, with your name in it. May I stick to it? I like it.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Donald William Alers Hankey      Print: Unknown, cuttings

  

[unknown] : [essay on rifling]

'Don't worry about me; at last I am a serious soldier. I have a pile of books on ordnance, and gunnery, and ammunition, and explosives etc., etc., littering my table, to say nothing of Napier's "Peninsular War", and a "Life of Napolean"![sic] So when my major made a surprise descent yesterday afternoon from Curepipe, he found me immersed in an essay on Rifling, and was rather pleased!'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Donald William Alers Hankey      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : The adventures of a louse

'at ten o'clock yesterday evening little Jem Parsons (the cabin boy), and his friend the black terrier, came on deck, and sat themselves on a gun-carriage, to read by the light of the moon. I looked at the boy's book, (the terrier, I suppose, read over the other's shoulder,) and found that it was "The Sorrows of Werter". I asked who had lent him such a book, and whether it amused him? He said that it had been made a present to him, and so he had read it almost through, for he had got to Werter's dying; though, to be sure, he did not understand it all, nor like very much what he understood; for he thought the man a great fool for killing himself for love. I told him I thought that every man a great fool who killed himself for love or for any thing else: but he had no books but "The Sorrows of Werter"? - oh dear yes, he said, he had a great many more; but he had got "The Adventures of a Louse", which was a very curious book, indeed; and he had got besides "The Recess", and "Valentine and Orson", and "Roslin Castle", and a book of Prayers, just like the Bible; but he could not but say that he liked "The Adventures of a Louse" the best of any of them.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Jem Parsons      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Roslin Castle

'at ten o'clock yesterday evening little Jem Parsons (the cabin boy), and his friend the black terrier, came on deck, and sat themselves on a gun-carriage, to read by the light of the moon. I looked at the boy's book, (the terrier, I suppose, read over the other's shoulder,) and found that it was "The Sorrows of Werter". I asked who had lent him such a book, and whether it amused him? He said that it had been made a present to him, and so he had read it almost through, for he had got to Werter's dying; though, to be sure, he did not understand it all, nor like very much what he understood; for he thought the man a great fool for killing himself for love. I told him I thought that every man a great fool who killed himself for love or for any thing else: but he had no books but "The Sorrows of Werter"? - oh dear yes, he said, he had a great many more; but he had got "The Adventures of a Louse", which was a very curious book, indeed; and he had got besides "The Recess", and "Valentine and Orson", and "Roslin Castle", and a book of Prayers, just like the Bible; but he could not but say that he liked "The Adventures of a Louse" the best of any of them.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Jem Parsons      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [book of prayers]

'at ten o'clock yesterday evening little Jem Parsons (the cabin boy), and his friend the black terrier, came on deck, and sat themselves on a gun-carriage, to read by the light of the moon. I looked at the boy's book, (the terrier, I suppose, read over the other's shoulder,) and found that it was "The Sorrows of Werter". I asked who had lent him such a book, and whether it amused him? He said that it had been made a present to him, and so he had read it almost through, for he had got to Werter's dying; though, to be sure, he did not understand it all, nor like very much what he understood; for he thought the man a great fool for killing himself for love. I told him I thought that every man a great fool who killed himself for love or for any thing else: but he had no books but "The Sorrows of Werter"? - oh dear yes, he said, he had a great many more; but he had got "The Adventures of a Louse", which was a very curious book, indeed; and he had got besides "The Recess", and "Valentine and Orson", and "Roslin Castle", and a book of Prayers, just like the Bible; but he could not but say that he liked "The Adventures of a Louse" the best of any of them.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Jem Parsons      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'There was little time left before supper, and we decided to go for short walk to have a look at the moon. This done, we sat down for a modest and simple meal of a little bit of cold meat, some lettuce and cheese, and spent the rest of the evening peacefully around the fire, reading, and talking about nothing in particular."

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : Arise to conquer

'Exhilarated with a terrible sadness, after reading "Arise to Conquer", I wondered if, when young men have done with the fighting and can come forward to do some of the thinking, shaping and building again, will they then be able (or willing) to contemplate more than the conquest of Jean.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I heard that peace was declared on May the 7th, about 7 or 8 o'clock in the evening, at home with my parents. We had not long finished dinner, the table was still set, my father was reading in the armchair, my stepmother was busy about the house, I was in the garden, mending a puncture on my bicycle. The end of the programmes came to an end on the wireless, the announcer gave the news that tomorrow, Tuesday, May the 8th, would be V-Day, and the day following a holiday. Quietly, my father said, "It's over."'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [works/news on Hitler and Nazi-Germany]

'I have dreamt of Hitler twice recently, I put this down [to] reading books in the international situation rather than to anxiety or worry. I do not consciously worry about the eventuality of war, but I do feel very deeply concerned about the suffering which has already been caused.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [a thriller]

'Before the deed was done, however, the person in question awakened (I found the said person had been reading a thriller along such lines and had partaken of a somewhat heavy supper).'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [books]

'I am forming my opinions mainly from what I read in books on economies, politics, history, etc. I read the daily papers, but I do not take a lot of notice of what I read in them from the point of view of their opinions on the war, and what shall be done after it. I get far more satisfaction from reading articles or books by authors such as C.E.M. Joad, H.G.Wells and Huxley.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Transactions of the Medico-Chirurgical Society

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : The Conduct of the British Government towards the Church of England in the West India Colonies

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Eikon Basilike

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Sermons or Homilies of the United Church of England

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Homeri Hymni et epigrammata

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Homeri Hymni et epigrammata

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Analysis of the Report of a Committee

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : The Age. A Poem. In eight books.

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Acta Seminarii Regii et Societatis Philologicae Li

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Carmina Illustrium Poetarum Italorum

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : A Harmonie upon the Three Evangelists

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'One of your brothers was brought to a liking of reading by my putting some Books which I had told amusing stories out of, in a place where they were difficultly come at and desiring that none of you might be allowed to spoil my books with your dirty Thumbs while I was abroad. He read them in a few daies [sic] and has continued to be fond of reading ever since.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Alexander Monro      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Catalogue of the Sheffield Subscription Library]

'We got the new catalogue from Library, The number of subscribers 118, there are near 2400 Books. [In Margin] Printed by Pierson'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      

  

[unknown] : The Spirit of the Public Journals for 1797

'Took [the] "Answer to Wilberforce" to the Chapel Library & brought "The Spirit of the Public Journals for 1797, Being an Impartial Selection ... Essays & Jeaux d'Espirits ... [from] the Newspapers & Other Publications ...".They are for the most part political. Some of the articles are copied from larger works than magazines & newspapers [eg.3 selections from] Lewis's "Monk". ...The Ode by Sr Will Jones ... has appeared many years ago & in many publications. ... There appears to be nevertheless a deal of choice matter in this publication.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : The Spirit of the Public Journals for 1797 [series

'Wrote out of the "Spirit of the Public Journals" "Washing Day", a poem in blank verse; originally printed in the "Monthly Magazine".'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : The Spirit of the Public Journals for 1797 [series

'When I brought the "Spirit of the Journals", I did not think that it would have contributed anything towards the account of Sheffield but I have extracted from it an account of a letter supposed to have been sent from "Yorke, General of the armed citizens of Sheffield", to the British National Convention, & the debate upon it from "The Times".'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : The Spirit of the Public Journals for 1797 [series

'Wrote also out of the "Spirit of the Journals" "a hymn for the fast day" by Captain Norrice on Foxe's Birthday.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : The Spirit of the Public Journals for 1797 [series

'Took the "Spirit of the Journals" to the Chapel Library [...] there are no less than 101 Epigrams on Messrs Pitt & Dundas going drunk to the House of Commons on the night of his majesty's message [of] war with France ...Many of which are very poor. These epigrams, Marat, an Epilogue ... & the Orgies of Bachus may be reckoned amongst the least happy articles in this volume.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Spanish Grammar

'In the evening read principally papers in the "Adventurer" and Rogers' "Pleasure of Memory"; thought less of the papers in the "Adventurer" than I had done formally, i.e. forty years ago or more, and less than I had been led to expect of Rogers. Went to bed about one, after beginning "Spanish Grammar".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Windham      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society

'Looked into "Philosophical Transactions" for paper of Dr Reid about momentums +c, could not find it but stumbled upon paper, page 663, i think vol.V or VI. among papers miscellaneous or omitted, where there were some calculations respecting probability'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Windham      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'about this time I began to practis accounts, I bought a Book, & Slate, and got somebody to set me a gate at the beginning of a Rule, & then wrought by my book &c, and in a while got forward in arethmatic &c'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Benjamin Shaw      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : 'a penny history'

'From my early years I was always a lover of books, and I well remeber when we lived in a solitary place that my mother on going to a neighbouring town, always bought me a penny history or a halfpenny collection of songs ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert White      

  

[unknown] : 'poetry and border ballads'

'Even while exerting myself to the utmost on the farm, I was not without my own pleasure, for during my leisure hours I read all the books and especially those consisting of poetry and Border-ballads that came within my reach. Some few I bought when I had money, some I borrowed, but the latter were limited as to number ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert White      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Latin Grammar]

'...and we now started Latin, in a little eighteenth-century reading book, out of which my Grandfather had been taught. It consisted of strings of works, and of grim arrangements of conjunction and declension, presented in a manner appallingly unattractive. I used to be set down in the study, under my Father's eye, to learn a solid page of this compilation, while he wrote or painted...It was almost more than human nature could bear to have to sit holding up to my face the dreary little Latin book, with its sheep-skin cover that smelt of mildewed paste.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Edmund Gosse      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [volume of engravings]

'My mother then received from her earlier home certain volumes, among which was a gaudy gift-book of some kind, containing a few steel engravings of statues. These attracted me violently, and here for the first time I gazed upon Apollo with his proud gesture, Venus in her undulations, the kirtled shape of Diana, and Jupiter voluminously bearded...In private I returned to examine my steel engravings of the statues, and I reflected that they were too beautiful to be so wicked as my Father thought they were."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Edmund Gosse      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : The Peep of Day; or a series of the earliest relig

BL edition inscribed 'Victoria of Prussia' and initialled page after page with some dates presumeably showing when read to. Earliest date 5th August 1871 lesson 1, Lesson 19 21 Aug 1871 lesson 29 by 26 Sept 1871, Lesson 1 'The Body' prayer to prevent body from getting hurt also dated 6 May 1872, 14 Sept 1878 lesson VI 'Of the Wicked Angels' dated 3 Jan 1879

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Victoria of Prussia      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Poems and Essays by a Lady Lately Deceased

The reader listed the contents of this publication. Vol 1. The Second Edition. 'Poems. Ode to Hope. Elegy on the death of Mr Garrick. A Ballad. Subject Love [underlined] for the Bath Easton Villa. Louisa a tale. Envy: a fragment. On the New Year. 'Essays. On Sensibility. On the Character of Latitia. On Politeness. On the Character of Casio. On Candour. '2nd Vol. Third Edition. On Fortitude. On the Advantages of Application [?]. On the Pleasures of Religion. On Gratitude. On Happiness. On Christian Perfection. On Resignation.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Frances Hamilton      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : The Christian Church from the Earliest Period to the Present Time

an Observation 'By those who profess a knowledge of human Nature, the real causes of deep and continued dissension will rarely be sought...'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Frances Hamilton      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : A Letter to Earl Stanhope

content of this letter described 'as objected' in a pamphlet recommended by his Lordship 1789 (presumably the reader had read the letter)

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Frances Hamilton      

  

[unknown] : Memoirs of Maximillion de Baltiure, Duke of Sully, Prime Minister to Henry the Great

Long description of the character of Duke Sully by Henry 4th of France: 'his temper harsh, unpatient, obstinate, too enterprizing, presuming too much upon his own opinions... I know also that he has no malignity in his heart, that he is indefatigable in business... I find no-one so capable as he is of consoling me... That he may daily unify his heart and his manners.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Frances Hamilton      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [volume about theological debate]

'There was also a thick volume bound in calf and containing a verbatim report of a controversy between a Protestant divine and a Roman Catholic priest some time about the middle of last century, with a long argument on transubstantiation and many references to the Douai Bible which greatly puzzled me, for I did not know what the Douai Bible was.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Edwin Muir      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [school books]

''I read all my new school books as soon as I got them; I read "The People's Journal", "The People's Friend", and "The Christian Herald". I read a complete series of sentimental love tales very popular at that time called "Sunday Stories". I read novels illustrating the dangers of intemperance and the values of thrift. I read a new periodical called "The Penny Magazine" which my brother Willie got: it was modelled on "Tit-bits", and contained all sorts of useless information. But I had no children's books and no fairy-tales: my father's witch stories made up for that.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Edwin Muir      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Sunday Stories

''I read all my new school books as soon as I got them; I read "The People's Journal", "The People's Friend", and "The Christian Herald". I read a complete series of sentimental love tales very popular at that time called "Sunday Stories". I read novels illustrating the dangers of intemperance and the values of thrift. I read a new periodical called "The Penny Magazine" which my brother Willie got: it was modelled on "Tit-bits", and contained all sorts of useless information. But I had no children's books and no fairy-tales: my father's witch stories made up for that.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Edwin Muir      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [novels]

''I read all my new school books as soon as I got them; I read "The People's Journal", "The People's Friend", and "The Christian Herald". I read a complete series of sentimental love tales very popular at that time called "Sunday Stories". I read novels illustrating the dangers of intemperance and the values of thrift. I read a new periodical called "The Penny Magazine" which my brother Willie got: it was modelled on "Tit-bits", and contained all sorts of useless information. But I had no children's books and no fairy-tales: my father's witch stories made up for that.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Edwin Muir      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [story]

'Out of all that reading only one memory survives now. The story itself I have forgotten but the scene was laid in Italy, and there was a chapter in which a beggar arrived at a cottage carrying a heavy sack, which he left in a corner while he went, as he said, to the barn to get some sleep. The woman of the house, who lived by herself, happened to touch the sack, felt it moving, and knew at once that there was a man in it who had come to murder her... When I read "Treasure Island" a few years later the horrible figure of the blind seaman Pew brought back again the terrors of that dream.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Edwin Muir      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [book on Wallace and Bruce]

'One day I saw a life of Carlyle in a bookshop window in Kirkwall and begged a shilling from my mother to buy it; but I found it was a shilling and threepence and I had to return dejectedly with a book on Wallace and Bruce instead. It was not a good book, and all I remember of it is a few lines quoted from Burns...'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Edwin Muir      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [story about the origin of Orkney and Shetland Islands]

'Curiously enough the story I remember best is a grotesque and rather silly one which appeared in an annual almanac issues by "The Orkney Herald". It was an account of the origin of the Orkney and Shetland Islands...'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Edwin Muir      Print: Serial / periodical, almanac

  

[unknown] : Bronco Bill

'In the lower part of the newsagent's windows were the journals that catered for me. By would be reformers they were lumped together as "penny dreadfuls". One was "Deadwood Dick" -a cowboy who was always bumping off people in Deadman's Gulch or Gallow's Ravine, The reformers told me that my mind would become brutalised by reading Penny Dreadfuls... Besides "Deadwood Dick" in the shop window there was "Bronco Bill", with stories of a similar type. And there was "Jack Wright".'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Stamper      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : Jack Wright

'In the lower part of the newsagent's windows were the journals that catered for me. By would be reformers they were lumped together as "penny dreadfuls". One was "Deadwood Dick" -a cowboy who was always bumping off people in Deadman's Gulch or Gallow's Ravine, The reformers told me that my mind would become brutalised by reading Penny Dreadfuls... Besides "Deadwood Dick" in the shop window there was "Bronco Bill", with stories of a similar type. And there was "Jack Wright".'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Stamper      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : History of the World War

'On incident stays clear in my mind. It was on one of the rare days, other than Christmas and New Year, when my grandmother and I went into the sitting room above the shop. The time was late afternoon, just before tea, and I was standing near the window, looking through one of the volumes of a garish and expensive "History of the World War" which my father had bought from a door-to-door salesman who had persuaded him that "it would be very useful for the little boy's education". Some illustration in the book -a photograph or drawing of a battleship or aeroplane or shell-burst or trench warfare - must have caught my fancy, and, as I noticed that John Slater was looking out from his window on the opposite side of the street, I held up my picture against the glass so that he might see it. The street was narrow enough for anyone with good eyesight even to read the caption if it were printed in large enough letters. John nodded and promptly held up a picture in a book he was reading. I turned over a page or two and then held up another picture. John responded. And soon we found ourselves caught up in a competition...'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Norman Nicholson      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'On incident stays clear in my mind. It was on one of the rare days, other than Christmas and New Year, when my grandmother and I went into the sitting room above the shop. The time was late afternoon, just before tea, and I was standing near the window, looking through one of the volumes of a garish and expensive "History of the World War" which my father had bought from a door-to-door salesman who had persuaded him that "it would be very useful for the little boy's education". Some illustration in the book -a photograph or drawing of a battleship or aeroplane or shell-burst or trench warfare - must have caught my fancy, and, as I noticed that John Slater was looking out from his window on the opposite side of the street, I held up my picture against the glass so that he might see it. The street was narrow enough for anyone with good eyesight even to read the caption if it were printed in large enough letters. John nodded and promptly held up a picture in a book he was reading. I turned over a page or two and then held up another picture. John responded. And soon we found ourselves caught up in a competition...'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: John Slater      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [detective stories]

'Tom... introduced me to Poe's "Tales", to my first detective stories and to the early novels of H.G. Wells.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Norman Nicholson      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [books on birds, animals, snakes, trees]

'I began now to borrow from the Sanatorium Library books on nature and the countryside -Hardy, Hudson, Jefferies, Gilbert White; books on birds, animals, snakes and trees. And all these presented a picture of an England which, except in a few secluded spots, no longer survived.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Norman Nicholson      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Penny Dreadfuls

'When I grew into a youth and read everything I got my hands on, from Penny Dreadfuls to the Holy Scriptures, I came across phrases that puzzled me, such as "sans-culotte", "shiftless rabble", "dregs of humanity", "ignorant masses". I wondered where all these worthless people lived. I could only think it must be London or some such place outside my ken. Then one day it dawned on me, these scornful and superior writers were writing about me, and the people who lived in our street. It knocked me sideways for a little time, till the temperament I had inherited from my mother pulled me straight again... The latest I have come across is Richard Church, for whom, as a poet and novelist, I have full respect...'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Stamper      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : How to make friends and influence people

'When I was a youth I envied others having this capacity to make close friends. I even bought a book, "How To Make Friends and Influence People". I read the book, but it did me no good; so I must be a hopeless case.'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Stamper      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [lives of Henry VIII's wives - see note below]

'Have finished the lives of Harry the VIIIths Queens, very interesting work. Reading a small treatise on "Pneumatics" to pick up a little of what I have forgotten'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Pneumatics

'Have finished the lives of Harry the VIIIths Queens, very interesting work. Reading a small treatise on "Pneumatics" to pick up a little of what I have forgotten'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [notice]

'My father took me to see them sold up. He must have been off work again, foundry work was little better than casual labour then. The auctioneer's man had taken the two halves of the sash window out. On the wall by the window was written in chalk: "Owing to Arrears of Rent and by Order of the Landlord. Sale this day at 2.30".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Stamper      Manuscript: Graffito

  

[unknown] : [notice]

'Whilst waiting my turn and having observed all these things, I started to spell out a notice above the mirror, I could read enough. It said "Haircut: Men 3d., Boys 2d., Shaving, 1d." That was in 1893, near enough. Prices have gone up a little since then.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Stamper      Print: Advertisement, Poster

  

[unknown] : Sylvestre Sound

'[Father] had joined the PSA at the YMCA. That is: the Pleasant Sunday Afternoon at the Young Men's Christian Association; a religious service with plenty of tuneful hymns, usually a couple of singers who gave "sacred" songs; and to which was attached a Book Club. By paying a few pence a week Father got all the books he could read; he was a slow reader, too. He got "Valentine Vox, Ventriloquist", "Sylvestre Sound", "Somnambulist"; "Uncle Tom's Cabin", and many others. Dolly has some of them at this date, sixty years later.'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Stamper      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Somnambulist

'[Father] had joined the PSA at the YMCA. That is: the Pleasant Sunday Afternoon at the Young Men's Christian Association; a religious service with plenty of tuneful hymns, usually a couple of singers who gave "sacred" songs; and to which was attached a Book Club. By paying a few pence a week Father got all the books he could read; he was a slow reader, too. He got "Valentine Vox, Ventriloquist", "Sylvestre Sound", "Somnambulist"; "Uncle Tom's Cabin", and many others. Dolly has some of them at this date, sixty years later.'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Stamper      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'...went along to the reference room of the public library to look up data on African trees. I searched the shelves and found just the book I wanted: a scientific work that gave full details of African trees. I sat studying it and making notes...'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Stamper      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Young People's First Book of Trees

'[given an alternative text by the librarian, entitled 'Young People's First Book of Trees'] Every time the man came through the room I slipped the African book on to my knees under the table and was intently studying the Young People's book...'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Stamper      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Worked an hour or two at French; I suppose I must now finish the history of Rome, having once begun it must be finished'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [book on pneumatics]

'Reading a book on Pneumatics and been thinking of making an Anemometer of my own invention do not know if it would succeed, and I have great doubts of my ever attempting it'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : History of Rome

'Reading "History of Rome", & amusing myself variously.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'And the female crocodile does make a nest! I had read all about it in a book from the library...'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Stamper      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Quain's Anatomy

'I was getting a lot of stiff reading out of the public library, now, "for my father". One work was "Quain's Anatomy" in two volumes. The first volume was anatomy and physiology. I read all about bones, muscles, lungs, liver, kidneys, ductless glands, all the whole issue. The second volume was on reproduction and embryology. I was completely fascinated...'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Stamper      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Astronomy and spectrum analysis]

'I read a lot of astronomy and that, too, was wonderful. The world is full of wonders if one only looks for them. One book I got was on spectrum analysis, as applied to astronomy. I was fascinated by this too. I could not put the book down. One evening Mother had not a penny for the gas, and there was no paraffin in the lamp she still had. I crouched on the fender, reading by the red glow of the fire, so close that my hair was singed.'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Stamper      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Astronomy and spectrum analysis]

'I was so interested in spectrum analysis that I took the big book to school with me, to read in playtime. The desks we had were box-type, there was a lid to lift and you could keep books inside. I had my book in there. We were doing composition. I had my head under the lid and inside the desk, reading more of the library book.'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Stamper      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Commenced work again to day in earnest - read some of the [following page missing]'

Unknown
Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I am going to try & commence work again, having done nothing since entering the sick list, except read a few novels and that class of books'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read a good deal during the day, and worked a Couple of hours at French.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Pontificale romanum Clementis VIII, part 2

'At noon my brother John came to me, and I corrected as well as I could his Greek speech against the Apposition, though I believe he himself was as well able to do it as myself. After that, we went to read in the great Officiale about the blessing of bells in the Church of Rome.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Back I went by Mr Downing's order, and stayed there till 12 a-clock in expectation of one to come to read some writings; but he came not, so I stayed all alone reading the answer of the Dutch Embassador to our state, in answer to the reasons of my Lord's coming home which he gave for his coming, and did labour herein to contradict my Lord's arguments for his coming home.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Manuscript: Sheet

  

[unknown] : The humble address and hearty desires of the gentlemen, ministers and free-holders of the county of Northampton, presented to his Excellency the Lord General Monck, at his arrival at Northampton January, 24, 1659

'I called at St Paul's churchyard, where I bought Buxtorfes Hebrew Grammar and read a declaration of the gentlemen of Northamptonshire - which came out this afternoon.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Broadsheet

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'In the morning up early and wrote another [character], my wife lying in bed and reading to me'

Unknown
Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      

  

[unknown] : Las cosas maravillosas della sancta ciudad de Roma

'This morning I lay long abed; then to my office, where I read all the morning my Spanish book of Rome.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Up to my chamber to read a little, and write my Diary for three or four days past.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I had the boy up tonight for his sister to teach him to put me to bed, and I heard him read, which he doth pretty well.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Wayneman Birch      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : Masse Book

'In Pauls churchyard I called at Kirton's; and there they had got a Masse book for me, which I bought and cost me 12s. And when I came home, sat up late and read in it - with great pleasure to my wife to hear that that she long ago was so well acquainted with.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [law book?]

'At night Mr Moore came and sat with me, and there I took a book and he did instruct me in many law=notions, in which I took great pleasure.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : An exact and most impartial accompt of the ... trial ... of nine and twenty regicides

'Home and fell a-reading of the tryalls of the late men that were hanged for the King's death; and found good satisfaccion in reading thereof.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : An exact and most impartial accompt of the ... trial ... of nine and twenty regicides

'Home by Coach and read late in the last night's book of the Tryalls...'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'So we parted, and I and Mr Creed to Westminster-hall and looked over a book or two, and so to My Lord's...'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After that home and to bed - reading myself asleep while the wench sat mending my breeches by my bedside.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : A proclamation for observation of the thirtieth day of January as a day of fast and humiliation according to the late act of parliament for that purpose

''This day the parson read a proclamacion at church for the keeping of Wednesday next, the 30th of January, a fast for the murther of the late King.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Handbill

  

[unknown] : [French Romances]

'And God forgive me, did spent it in reading some little French Romances.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Good books]

'and I home and stayed there all day within - having found Mr Moore, who stayed with me till at night, talking and reading some good books.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [book]

'Then by linke home - and there to my book awhile and to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [book]

'Then home - I to read.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [book]

'Then to reading and at night to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'And then I up to my chamber to read.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so home, and after a little reading, to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Having writ letters into the country and read something, I went to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'And then came home with us Sir W. Pen and drank with us and then went away; and my wife after him to see his daughter that is lately come out of Ireland. I stayed at home at my book.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [chancery Bill drawn against Trice]

'Dined at home; and so about my business in the afternoon to the temple, where I find my chancery bill drawn against T. Trice; which I read, and like it.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Manuscript: Sheet

  

[unknown] : [unknown- little but shrewd piece]

'So to bed, with my mind cheery upon it; and lay long reading Hobbs his "liberty and necessity", and a little but a very shrewd piece.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : Additional evidences... relating to the reigns of K. James and K. Charles

'and so up to my study and read the two treatys before Mr Selden's "Mare Clausum"; and so to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'And so home by Coach and I late reading in my Chamber; and then to bed, my wife being angry that I keep the house up so late.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Hence home and to read; and so to bed, but very late again.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'so home - to read - supper and to prayers; and then to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I up to my chamber to read and write, and so to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'At night to my chamber to read and sing; and so to supper and to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'He being gone, I to my study and read; and so to eat a bit of bread and cheese and so to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [letter]

'This night Tom came to show me a civil letter sent him from his mistress.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Manuscript: Letter

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so to my office, practising arthmetique alone and making an end of last night's book, with great content, till 11 at night; and so home to supper and to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : The tryal of Sir Henry Vane, Kt., at the Kings Bench, Westminster, June the 2nd and 6th, 1662, together with what he intended to have spoken the day of his sentence (June 11) for arrest of judgment...

'at night my wife read "Sir H. Vanes trial" to me, which she begun last night, and I find it a very excellent thing, worth reading, and him to have been a very wise man.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : The tryal of Sir Henry Vane, Kt., at the Kings Bench, Westminster, June the 2nd and 6th, 1662, together with what he intended to have spoken the day of his sentence (June 11) for arrest of judgment...

'at night my wife read "Sir H. Vanes trial" to me, which she begun last night, and I find it a very excellent thing, worth reading, and him to have been a very wise man.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [Writ]

'Towards noon there comes a man in, as if upon ordinary business, and shows me a Writt from the Exchequer, called a Comission of Rebellion, and tells me that I am his prisoner - in Fields business.'

Unknown
Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      

  

[unknown] : [playbill]

'While my wife dressed herself, Creed and I walked out to see what play was acted today, and we find it "The Sleighted mayde".'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Advertisement, Broadsheet, Poster, playbill

  

[unknown] : [vowes]

'and I to my office till the evening, doing one thing or other and reading my vowes as I am bound every Lord's day'

Unknown
Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Spanish books]

'staying a little in Paul's churchyard at the forreigne booksellers, looking over some Spanish books and with much ado keeping myself from laying out money there'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [vowes]

'While that [dinner] was prepared, to my office to read over my vowes, with great affection and to very good purpose.'

Unknown
Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Navy precedents

'So home to my office, alone till dark, reading some part of my old "Navy precedents", and so home to supper.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Report of the proceedings of the commission of 1618]

'to my office and there made an end of reading my book that I have had of Mr Barlows, of the Journall of the Comissioners of the Navy who begun to act in the year 1618 and continued six years; wherein is fine observations and precedents, out of which I do purpose to make a good collection.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [vowes]

'So home; and after reading my vowes, being sleepy, without prayers to bed'

Unknown
Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      

  

[unknown] : A vindication of the degree of gentry in opposition to titular honours, and the humour of riches being the measure of honours. Done by a person of quality

'And so walk and by water to White-hall, all our way by water, both coming and going, reading a little book said to be writ by a person of Quality concerning English Gentry to be preferred before Titular honours; but the most silly nonsense, no sense nor grammar, yet in as good words that I ever saw in all my life, that from beginning to end you meet not with one entire and regular sentence.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Statute book]

'I to my office and there read all the morning in my Statute-book, consulting among others the statute against seeling of offices, wherein Mr Coventry is so much concerned.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Up and to read a little;'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Paris Vulgate [or] Latin Testament

'Thence by water home and to bed - having played out of my chamber-window on my pipe before I went to bed - and making Will read a part of a Latin chapter, in which I perceive in a little while he will be pretty ready, if he spends but a little pains in it.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Will Hewer      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Paris Vulgate [or] Latin Testament

'Home in the evening and to my office, where despatched business and so home. And after Wills reading a little in the Latin Testament, to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Will Hewer      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [vowes]

'and then I to my office and read my vowes seriously and with content; and so home to supper, to prayers, and to bed.'

Unknown
Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Paris Vulgate [or] Latin Testament

'then a Latin chapter of Will and to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Will Hewer      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [vowes]

'So to the reading of my vowes seriously, and then to supper.'

Unknown
Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      

  

[unknown] : Paris Vulgate [or] Latin Testament

'So home and up to my lute long; and then after a little Latin chapter with Will, to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Will Hewer      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [books on timber measuring and tides]

'Myself very studious to learn what I can of all things necessary for my place as an officer of the Navy - reading lately what concerns measuring of timber and knowledge of the tides.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [vowes]

'and so home and to my office a while to read my vowes. The home to prayers and to bed.'

Unknown
Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      

  

[unknown] : [vowes]

'So home to dinner alone. And then to read a little and so to church again, where the Scott made an ordinary sermon; and so home to my office and there read over my vowes, and encreased them by a vow against all strong drink till November next, of any sort of Quantity... Then I fell to read over a silly play, writ by a person of Honour (which is, I find, as much to say a coxcombe) called "Love a la mode".'

Unknown
Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'So home to dinner alone. And then to read a little and so to church again, where the Scott made an ordinary sermon; and so home to my office and there read over my vowes, and encreased them by a vow against all strong drink till November next, of any sort of Quantity... Then I fell to read over a silly play, writ by a person of Honour (which is, I find, as much to say a coxcombe) called "Love a la mode".'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Paris Vulgate [or] Latin Testament

'And being in bed, made Will read and conster three or four Latin verses in the bible and chid him for forgetting the grammer.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Will Hewer      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [vowes]

'I sat up an hour after Mr Coventry was gone to read my vowes - it raining a wonderful hard showre about 11 at night for an hour together. So to bed.'

Unknown
Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      

  

[unknown] : [vowes]

'So home and at my office reading my vowes;'

Unknown
Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      

  

[unknown] : Paris Vulgate [or] Latin Testament

'Home and stayed up a good while, examining Will in his Latin bible and my brother along with him in his Greeke. And so to prayers and to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Will Hewer      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Thence by coach with my Lord Peterborough and Sandwich to my Lord Peterborough's house; and there, after an hour's looking over some fine books of the Italian buildings with fine cuts, and also my Lord Peterborough's bowes and arrows, of which he is a great lover, we sat down to dinner...'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown - recipes]

'and so we went to boat again and then down to the bridge and there tried to find a sister of Mrs Morrices, but she was not within neither, and so we went through bridge and I carried them on board the King's pleasure-boat - all the way reading in a book of Receipts of making fine meats and sweetmeats; among others, one "To make my own sweet water" - which made us good sport.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [proclamation]

'This day I read a proclamacion for calling in and commanding everybody to apprehend my Lord Bristoll.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Broadsheet, Handbill, Poster

  

[unknown] : [vowes]

'Then into the garden to read my weekly vowes.'

Unknown
Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      

  

[unknown] : [bills advertising a cure for smoking chimneys]

'This day my wife showed me bills printed, wherein her father, with Sir John Collidon and Sir Edwd. Ford, hath got a patent for curing of smoking chimnys. I wish they may do good thereof - but fear it will prove but a poor project.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Handbill

  

[unknown] : [anatomy of the body]

'Up and to my office, where all the morning - and part of it Sir J Mennes spent as he doth everything else, like a fool, reading the Anatomy of the body to me, but so sillily as to the making of me understand anything that I was weary of him.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Sir John Mennes [or Minnes]      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [vowes]

'And read very seriously my vowes, which I am fearful of forgetting by my late great expenses - but I hope in God I do not. And so to bed.'

Unknown
Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      

  

[unknown] : [vowes]

'So home and my wife and I together all the evening, discoursing; and then after reading my vowes to myself... we hastened to supper and to bed.'

Unknown
Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      

  

[unknown] : [vowes]

'So home to prayers, and then to read my vowes and to bed.'

Unknown
Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      

  

[unknown] : [Arithmetic books]

'my wife, it being a cold day and it begin to snow, kept her bed till after dinner. And I below by myself looking over my arithmetique books and Timber Rule.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [vowes]

'To church; where after sermon, home and to my office before dinner, reading my vowes;'

Unknown
Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'He gone, I to my office and there late, writing and reading; and so home to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [on the globes]

'and then I begin to read to my wife upon the globes, with great pleasure and to good purpose, for it will be pleasant to her and to me to have her understand those things.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'so home to dinner with my poor wife; and after dinner read a lecture to her in Geography, which she takes very prettily, and with great pleasure to her and me to teach her.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Spanish books]

'and then through Bedlam (calling by the way at an old bookseller's, and there fell into looking over Spanish books and pitched upon some, till I thought of my oath when I was going to agree for them and so with much ado got myself out of the shop, glad at my heart and so away)'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'So home, reading all the way a good book;'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [lecture on the globes]

'and after supper, to read a lecture to my wife upon the globes, and so to prayers and to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Dick Turpin

'The favourite literary pabulum of us boys at school, however, was less classical: "penny bloods" and other Weeklies issued in penny sheets, such as "Sweeny Todd the Barber". Romantic stories of highwaymen circulated freely from boy to boy until reduced to rags: Dick Turpin, Spring-heeled Jack, the gallant Claude Duval, gracefully dancing on the greensward with the ladies he had robbed, Edith the Captive, Edith Heron, with what impatience we awaited the issue of the next number, with what absorbing interest we followed the thrilling adventure!... What it did was to evoke the reading habit, and to one boy at least that was a valuable endowment. Nor did the "Boys of England" proffer a much healthier pabulum to the hunger of the young barbarian for extra-lawful adventure. I can even today visualise the number I read with the lovely alliterate title of its opening story, "Alone in the Pirates' Lair" - and the front page illustration - Jack Harkaway, sitting before the pirate on the island, open-eyed, drinking in the recital of his hazardous deeds;...'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Okey      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : Spring-heeled Jack

'The favourite literary pabulum of us boys at school, however, was less classical: "penny bloods" and other Weeklies issued in penny sheets, such as "Sweeny Todd the Barber". Romantic stories of highwaymen circulated freely from boy to boy until reduced to rags: Dick Turpin, Spring-heeled Jack, the gallant Claude Duval, gracefully dancing on the greensward with the ladies he had robbed, Edith the Captive, Edith Heron, with what impatience we awaited the issue of the next number, with what absorbing interest we followed the thrilling adventure!... What it did was to evoke the reading habit, and to one boy at least that was a valuable endowment. Nor did the "Boys of England" proffer a much healthier pabulum to the hunger of the young barbarian for extra-lawful adventure. I can even today visualise the number I read with the lovely alliterate title of its opening story, "Alone in the Pirates' Lair" - and the front page illustration - Jack Harkaway, sitting before the pirate on the island, open-eyed, drinking in the recital of his hazardous deeds;...'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Okey      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : Claude Duval

'The favourite literary pabulum of us boys at school, however, was less classical: "penny bloods" and other Weeklies issued in penny sheets, such as "Sweeny Todd the Barber". Romantic stories of highwaymen circulated freely from boy to boy until reduced to rags: Dick Turpin, Spring-heeled Jack, the gallant Claude Duval, gracefully dancing on the greensward with the ladies he had robbed, Edith the Captive, Edith Heron, with what impatience we awaited the issue of the next number, with what absorbing interest we followed the thrilling adventure!... What it did was to evoke the reading habit, and to one boy at least that was a valuable endowment. Nor did the "Boys of England" proffer a much healthier pabulum to the hunger of the young barbarian for extra-lawful adventure. I can even today visualise the number I read with the lovely alliterate title of its opening story, "Alone in the Pirates' Lair" - and the front page illustration - Jack Harkaway, sitting before the pirate on the island, open-eyed, drinking in the recital of his hazardous deeds;...'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Okey      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : Edith the Captive

'The favourite literary pabulum of us boys at school, however, was less classical: "penny bloods" and other Weeklies issued in penny sheets, such as "Sweeny Todd the Barber". Romantic stories of highwaymen circulated freely from boy to boy until reduced to rags: Dick Turpin, Spring-heeled Jack, the gallant Claude Duval, gracefully dancing on the greensward with the ladies he had robbed, Edith the Captive, Edith Heron, with what impatience we awaited the issue of the next number, with what absorbing interest we followed the thrilling adventure!... What it did was to evoke the reading habit, and to one boy at least that was a valuable endowment. Nor did the "Boys of England" proffer a much healthier pabulum to the hunger of the young barbarian for extra-lawful adventure. I can even today visualise the number I read with the lovely alliterate title of its opening story, "Alone in the Pirates' Lair" - and the front page illustration - Jack Harkaway, sitting before the pirate on the island, open-eyed, drinking in the recital of his hazardous deeds;...'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Okey      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : Edith Heron

'The favourite literary pabulum of us boys at school, however, was less classical: "penny bloods" and other Weeklies issued in penny sheets, such as "Sweeny Todd the Barber". Romantic stories of highwaymen circulated freely from boy to boy until reduced to rags: Dick Turpin, Spring-heeled Jack, the gallant Claude Duval, gracefully dancing on the greensward with the ladies he had robbed, Edith the Captive, Edith Heron, with what impatience we awaited the issue of the next number, with what absorbing interest we followed the thrilling adventure!... What it did was to evoke the reading habit, and to one boy at least that was a valuable endowment. Nor did the "Boys of England" proffer a much healthier pabulum to the hunger of the young barbarian for extra-lawful adventure. I can even today visualise the number I read with the lovely alliterate title of its opening story, "Alone in the Pirates' Lair" - and the front page illustration - Jack Harkaway, sitting before the pirate on the island, open-eyed, drinking in the recital of his hazardous deeds;...'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Okey      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [books about the Navy]

'Thence walked with Mr Coventry to St James's and there spent by his desire the whole morning reading of some old Navy books given him of old Sir John Cookes by the Arch-Bishop of Canterbury that now is; wherein the order that was observed in the Navy then, above what it is now, is very observable, and fine things we did observe in our reading.'

Unknown
Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      

  

[unknown] : [plays]

'So stayed within all day, reading of two or three good plays.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After supper I up to read a little, and then to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'At night home to supper, weary and my eyes sore with writing and reading - and to bed.'

Unknown
Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      

  

[unknown] : Ichthyothera; or the royal trade of fishing [probably]

'and there fitted myself and took a hackney-coah I hired (it being a very cold and fowle day) to Woolwich, all the way reading in a good book touching the Fishery; and that being done, in the book upon the statutes of Charitable uses, mightily to my satisfaction.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so home and with her [wife] all the evening, reading and at musique with my boy, with great pleasure; and so to supper, prayers and to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

The boy is 'discontented ... because I cannot understand that which I reade'. The Devil Magirus 'expounded the places that were difficult', and for this reading expertise the student promises the Devil his soul. He later regrets this, but disappears, presumably carried off by the Devil.

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: anon [a boy]      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'at night home to look over my new books, and so late to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [copy of verses]

'and so we set out for Chatham - in my way overtaking some company, wherein was a lady, very pretty, riding single, her husband in company with her. We fell into talk, and I read a copy of verses which her husband showed me, and he discommended but the lady commended; and I read them so as to make the husband turn to commend them.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'At night to read, being weary with this day's great work.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and after supper to read melancholy alone, and then to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [a play]

'Up, and walked to Greenwich reading a play, and to the office'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [parliamentary bill]

'but he showed me a bill which hath been read in the House making all breakng of bulk for the time to come felony; but it is a foolish Act and will do no great matter'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      

  

[unknown] : [book about painting]

'and then up, and fell to reading of Mr Eveling's book about Paynting, which is a very pretty book.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : L'Ami des Enfants

'I worked till supper with [Madame de Bombelles] whilst Mama read something from "L'Ami des Enfants".'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Agathe Wynne      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I got up very late and ate a large breakfast after which I prayed and read with Mama almost till dinner time'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth (Betsey) Wynne      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [sermon]

'I stayed in bed till 4 oclock this afternoon the sermon was read after dinner. It was fine but a little too strong'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth (Betsey) Wynne      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [sermon]

'Mamma suffers much and was obliged to go to bed after dinner so Mr de Regis read the sermon which was on the small number of elect and one of the finest that we have read. It seems there is much difficulty in saving oneself the way to heaven is narrow they say and that to damnation is wide. What I learnt from this sermon was that one must not be content with what one says, "I do, as others do", for it is just then that we say "I damn myself". Happily in Wartegg we have not many occasions to sin...'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: [Mr] de Regis      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [sermon]

'I did not hear much of the sermon today, it was on Apathy for whilst it was being read the children made such a noise and Made. de B. whilst embroidering her waistcoat never stopped talking to the Abbe and giving him good advice all the time that I was distracted and could not pay the least attention to the sermon'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth (Betsey) Wynne      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [sermon]

'The Sermon was read this evening: very fine but the praises of the king are too strong'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth (Betsey) Wynne      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [sermon]

'The sermon that we read was on the Passion and even finer than the last'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Eugenia Wynne and others     Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'From this time [7pm] till nine o'clock, the prisoners are allowed to read such books as they may have obtained from the library. To show us that the men were generally so occupied, the officer who had attended us throughout the day now led us from cell to cell, and drew aside the small metal screen that hung down before the little peep hole in each door, when, on looking through it, we found almost every prisoner whom we peeped in upon seated close to the gas-light, and busily engaged in persuing either some book or periodical that was spread out before him.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: prisoners at Pentonville prison     Print: Book, Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [letter]

'we had reached a cell in the west wing, to which the first letter was addressed. The women were locked up in their cells during tea-time, and the clerk, placing her mouth close against the door, called the name of the prisoner located within. "Yes, mum", was the answer that came from the cell. "Here's a letter for you", added the clerk, as she stooped down and threw the document under the door. In a moment there was a postive scream of delight from within, followed by a cry of "Oh! how glad I am". Then we could hear the poor creature tear open the sheet, and begin mumbling the contents to herself in half hysteric tones.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Manuscript: Letter

  

[unknown] : [letter]

'In the laundry, the prisoner to whom the letter was given smiled gratefully in the clerk's face, as she thrust it into her bosom. "Can you read it?" inquired the letter-carrier, who seemed almost as delighted as the prisoner herself. "Oh yes, mum, thank you" replied the woman; and she hurried to the other end of the wash-house, to enjoy its contents quietly be herself.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Manuscript: Letter

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

Inspection of the cells of the women in separate confinement: 'we found some working, and others reading, but none, strange to say, idling'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: prisoners in separate confinement at Brixton Prison     Print: Book, Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

Inspection of the East Wing between 8:30pm and time of retirement: 'with their little wooden seats [they] placed themselves just within their doors, where they began reading.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: prisoners in East Wing at Brixton Prison     Print: Book, Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : Family Quarrel - an humble story

'We found some of the prisoners here engaged in reading, while waiting till the officers returned from their breakfast. One was perusing a treatise on "Infidelity; its Aspects, Causes and Agencies"; another the "Home Friend - a weekly miscellany"; a third, the "Saturday Magazine"; a fourth, the "History of Redemption"; and a fifth, the "Family Quarrel - an humble story".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

The infirmary: 'Some of the men were in bed and sitting up reading, and others were lying down, looking very ill.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: prisoners in the infirmary at Millbank     Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [French and German language books]

Recognised among the prisoners a once eminent City merchant, sentenced to transportation for fraud: 'This person, we were told, found special consolation in the study of languages, and on the table of his cell was a high pyramid of books, consisting of French and German exercises, with others of a religious character.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'A few of the men were reading, and never raised their eyes'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: prisoners at Coldbath Fields     Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'In one of the yards we noticed...an old man of eighty, with hair as white as the prison walls themselves, and which was especially striking from the generality of prisoners being mere youths. He no sooner saw us enter, than hastily put on his spectacles, he commenced reading, bending his face down as if to hide it from shame... he had once held a high command in the army. He was there for a nameless offence.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'A big sailor-looking man with red whiskers growing under his chin, advanced to the hearer's desk. Not a word was spoken as the copy-book was handed in. The prison-tutor pointed in silence to a mistake, the pupil nodded, and, on another signal, began to read aloud what he had written, "Give to every man that asketh, and of him that taketh away thy goods, ask him not again".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Manuscript: Sheet

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Another - a lad with a bandage round his face, and heavy, dingy-coloured eyes - was sent back for having too many blots and errors. This man, when repeating his lessons, stumbled over the sentence "There shall be wailing and gnashing of teeth", calling it "genashing" instead.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Manuscript: Sheet

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Once the head master had occasion to speak. A lad with ruddy skin, and light hair, had a defect in his speech, and could not pronounce his "r's", so that he read out: "Whatsoever is wight that shall ye weceive". "Do try and pronounce your 'r's' better", said the master, kindly; and there upon there was a shuffling of feet from the other pupils, as if the only method of laughing under the silent system was with the shoes.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Manuscript: Sheet

  

[unknown] : [Religious Tracts]

Sundays at Coldbath Fields Prison, only half the prisoners can attend chapel at one time: 'Those who are left behind are not, however, allowed to remain without religious instruction. Three men in each yard have been appointed by the chaplain to read aloud to their fellow prisoners, and each relieves the other every half hour. The book for Sunday's reading is issued by the chaplain. It is of a purely religious character, and is usually "The Penny Sunday Reader", containing short sermons. Tracts are also distributed in the different yards, so that those who prefer reading to themselves, instead of listening to what is being read aloud, may do so.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: prisoners at Coldbath Fields     Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'A young man sat in the corner of another cell with his cheek leaning on his hand and his elbow resting on the table. He appeared to be absorbed reading. The labour machine stood beside him, with the handle pointing upwards, as if he were exhausted, and was recruiting his strength, by taking a glance at some book which interested him.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [lesson: either Bible or school textbook]

Schoolroom for juvenile males at Wandsworth Prison: 'One little pale-faced boy was reading his lesson to his kind-hearted teacher... One boy had copied from a Bible, which lay before him, a verse of the 26th chapter of Proverbs: "As snow in summer, as rain in harvest, so honour is not seemly for a fool!" He was a sharp-eyed lad of fourteen, with a finely formed countenance.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

Pictures from the cells at Wandsworth: 'Before leaving, on the third day of our visit, we visited the cell where the little girl was confined, whom we had seen in the punishment cell. She was clad in another prison dress, and was reading a book, and appeared to be quiet and subdued in her manner. She had been subjected to a punishment of bread and water for two days. From her card we found she was under confinement for picking pockets; there was nothing remarkable in her appearance.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

Juvenile schoolroom at Holloway Prison: 'Mr Barre, the teacher, [was] busy with a class of boys, who were reading their primers. The lessons consisted of monosyllables, such as "They walk by faith and not by sight"... The teacher was seated in his uniform by a table, with a class of half a dozen boys ranged on a form before him. Some were writing on their slates, while others were reading. Sometimes they read together, and at other times one boy read by himself... After hearing them read for some time, the teacher exercised them in simple questions of mental arithmetic...'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: juvenile male prisoners at Holloway     Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

Newgate Prison: Visiting the cells: 'We first went to Gallery B, occupied by penal servitude men. In one cell we saw a pleasant looking, dark-complexioned man of about 30 years of age, sitting with one knee over the other reading a book.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [manuscripts]

Newgate Prison: Visiting the cells: 'In another cell we saw a respectable looking man in middle life, seated at his table with his head leaning on his hand, and copious manuscripts spread before him. On seeing us approach, he appeared to be a little sensitive. He was dressed in a fine black coat and vest, and light trousers. He was charged with obtaining goods to the enormous amount of ?12,000, and represented himself to be a merchant.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Manuscript: Sheet

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

Horsemonger Lane Gaol - Visiting the cells: 'On looking into another cell, we saw a prisoner sentenced to penal servitude, engaged reading by his table, having just finished his dinner. He was born in Canada, and came to this country with his father in early life, to secure certain property left by an uncle. He was a good looking man, a costermonger, and complained he had been hunted by the police from pillar to post, and driven into misfortune.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Rudolph of Wertenberg

'Ever since I have read "Rudolph of Wertenberg" I have more pleasure when I walk round this country, as it makes me remember on all that has happen in former times in this part of Switzerland, of which I have been well informed by that book; which I read with the greatst Satisfaction - and that I shall not forget So Soon'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth (Betsey) Wynne      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'in the Army I spent most of my leisure reading in a desultory fashion anything that aroused my interest. Later on I bought or borrowed books on subjects not usually studied by privates, and began to co-ordinate my reading. Soldiers who did much reading were then objects of suspicion and I began to find myself a marked man.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Stuart Wood [pseud?]      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After a wait of two months as a trial prisoner, during which I was able to do a considerable amount of reading, I was taken to the Guildhall for trial'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Stuart Wood [pseud?]      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [book on China]

'I had read about this country [China] with its forty centuries of history - more or less static, but which, at the present time, is passing through the most momentous transformation in history'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Stuart Wood [pseud?]      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown- various titles]

'There was also a pretty good library on board [HMS Spartiate], and I suppose the chaplain, who had charge of it, had noticed that I chose books not usually read by stokers and had commented on it. During our trips from place to place I used to sit or lie on the fo'c'sle when not on watch reading biography, criticism, history and philosophy, or indeed any book of more than ephemeral interest.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Stuart Wood [pseud?]      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [sermons]

'I read the Bible because in my humble opinion it is one of the most difficult books in the language to read correctly, as many parsons would do well to realise; sermons, Bampton and Gifford lectures, lectures on art, drama, history, science and philosophy, and also speeches by the acknowledged masters of oratory... For what? Nothing!'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Stuart Wood [pseud?]      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Bampton lectures

'I read the Bible because in my humble opinion it is one of the most difficult books in the language to read correctly, as many parsons would do well to realise; sermons, Bampton and Gifford lectures, lectures on art, drama, history, science and philosophy, and also speeches by the acknowledged masters of oratory... For what? Nothing!

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Stuart Wood [pseud?]      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Gifford lectures

'I read the Bible because in my humble opinion it is one of the most difficult books in the language to read correctly, as many parsons would do well to realise; sermons, Bampton and Gifford lectures, lectures on art, drama, history, science and philosophy, and also speeches by the acknowledged masters of oratory... For what? Nothing!

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Stuart Wood [pseud?]      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [lectures on art, drama, history, science and philosophy]

'I read the Bible because in my humble opinion it is one of the most difficult books in the language to read correctly, as many parsons would do well to realise; sermons, Bampton and Gifford lectures, lectures on art, drama, history, science and philosophy, and also speeches by the acknowledged masters of oratory... For what? Nothing!'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Stuart Wood [pseud?]      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [speeches]

'I read the Bible because in my humble opinion it is one of the most difficult books in the language to read correctly, as many parsons would do well to realise; sermons, Bampton and Gifford lectures, lectures on art, drama, history, science and philosophy, and also speeches by the acknowledged masters of oratory... For what? Nothing!'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Stuart Wood [pseud?]      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Henry VIII]

'At Wormwood Scrubs I lent a work on Henry VIII to a jewel thief. When he returned it, he remarked that he had enjoyed it very much and, if I had another similar book, he would like to read it. As he did not strike me as being the type of man to take so keen an interest in history as his praise of the book seemed to imply, I asked him what aspects of Henry the Eight had aroused his interest. He replied that it was Henry's penchant for women that had intrigued him. Only he didn't put it quite like that. What he really said was something like this: "Gor blimey! Wasn't 'e a b- (son of a bachelor) for wimmin! Tork abaht us blokes bein' 'at stuff, why the b- had a bleedin' 'Arem! Them kings, and blokes like 'im, were the dirtiest lot of b-'s I've ever read abaht. Tork abaht Marie Monk! Why there ain't a bloke in this nick, or Dartmoor, or Pankhurst, as is a quarter as bad as these blokes yer reads abaht in 'istory!"'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after I had a bath or a wash we would fall to and spend the rest of the evening round the fire, I reading and Kate sewing or knitting. I joined the public library and so got plenty of good literature.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Stuart Wood [pseud?]      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown - various titles]

'I read hard in divinity, history and general literature, and threw myself into the religious life of the prison to assuage my pain. The chaplain was a decent fellow, as chaplains go, and as an educated man always receives some consideration as to literature I was able to get hold of some pretty good stuff... I renewed my acquaintance with the lives of the Fathers, read several biographies of Christ and St Paul and also studies on the Apostles.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Stuart Wood [pseud?]      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [lives of the Fathers]

'I read hard in divinity, history and general literature, and threw myself into the religious life of the prison to assuage my pain. The chaplain was a decent fellow, as chaplains go, and as an educated man always receives some consideration as to literature I was able to get hold of some pretty good stuff... I renewed my acquaintance with the lives of the Fathers, read several biographies of Christ and St Paul and also studies on the Apostles.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Stuart Wood [pseud?]      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [biographies of Christ]

'I read hard in divinity, history and general literature, and threw myself into the religious life of the prison to assuage my pain. The chaplain was a decent fellow, as chaplains go, and as an educated man always receives some consideration as to literature I was able to get hold of some pretty good stuff... I renewed my acquaintance with the lives of the Fathers, read several biographies of Christ and St Paul and also studies on the Apostles.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Stuart Wood [pseud?]      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [biographies of St Paul]

'I read hard in divinity, history and general literature, and threw myself into the religious life of the prison to assuage my pain. The chaplain was a decent fellow, as chaplains go, and as an educated man always receives some consideration as to literature I was able to get hold of some pretty good stuff... I renewed my acquaintance with the lives of the Fathers, read several biographies of Christ and St Paul and also studies on the Apostles.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Stuart Wood [pseud?]      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [studies on the Apostles]

'I read hard in divinity, history and general literature, and threw myself into the religious life of the prison to assuage my pain. The chaplain was a decent fellow, as chaplains go, and as an educated man always receives some consideration as to literature I was able to get hold of some pretty good stuff... I renewed my acquaintance with the lives of the Fathers, read several biographies of Christ and St Paul and also studies on the Apostles.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Stuart Wood [pseud?]      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown - various titles]

Second confinement in the Prison at Hull: 'To enumerate some of the books I read would be to write a small catalogue; but I covered a fairly wide range in drama, fiction, poetry, biography, history, science, philosophy, theology, besides miscellaneous reading.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Stuart Wood [pseud?]      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Greek Philosophy]

'At Maidstone, both on this occasion and subsequently when I served several months in separate confinement as a convict preparatory to going to Parkhurst, I was able, through the chaplain's kindness, to study not only Greek philosophy, but also Locke, Hume, Berkeley, Kant, Hegel, Fichte, Schelling, Schopenhauer, Fechner, Lotze, etc. Being a very rapid reader and having some ability in getting at the gist of a book I got through a fair amount of really interesting reading. ... In the summer I grabbed a book as soon as it was light enough to read, say, four o'clock, read till and during breakfast, dinner, supper and continued till 9:30 or 10 o'clock at night, an average of 8 to 10 hours a day. There were times, of course, when the burden of prison life bred a spirit of discontent and restlessness which books could not assuage.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Stuart Wood [pseud?]      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Abyssinia]

'Here I have been reading an account of Abyssinia, being a volume of the "Family Library", wherein you travel one stage (or chapter) with Bruce; then half a stage with some Portuguese missionary, and the remainder of it with Salt, or somebody else: you are never sure of your travelling companion.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Mitchel      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Quarterly Review

'Have been reading the "Quarterly Review" on Lyell's tour in North America. The "Quarterly" rejoices, quite generously, in American Art, and "Progress", and so forth - but is mainly solicitous that the Americans should - for their own sake, fo course - stay at peace. "For", says the generous reviewer, "As the future of America, to be a glorious future, must be a future of peace, so we would hope that it may be fruitful in all which embellishes and occupies and glorifies peace." - Most balmy language!'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Mitchel      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [trial of Governor Wale]

'Eugenia and myself were much interested in reading the trial of Governor Wale who I recollect seeing at Florence - he is condemned to be hanged for flogging a man to death when Governor of the Island of Goree about 20 years ago. He seems to deserve his fate but it is a horrible thing for his wife and family'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Betsey and Eugenia Wynne     Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : Sermons

'I was so ennuyed at my blindness, that one evening I made the Chaplain read me four Sermons, which alleviated my suffering for a time'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Fremantle      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : Death Notch the Avenging Rancher

Dec 9 'Sunday, Had a swim then breakfast and kikied anchor bound for [indecipherable]. Read "Death Notch the Avenging Rancher" Made very little headway.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Newton Barton      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [Bulletin]

13 Mar 'This is written in bad light and the vessel heaving and rolling. Hicks is discovering sweet music on the accordeon. Luce is reading a bulletin 2 years old. Nosey is at the wheel and the others are on deck.'

Unknown
Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Luce      

  

[unknown] : [pestilent literature of rascaldom]

'The individual...was a fellow-worker of mine for nigh two years in Dartmoor. He had, in his younger days, passed through the workhouse; read the pestilent literature of rascaldom which has educated so many criminal characters in this country; then graduated in the "School", and ultimately became a noted burglar. His reading in prison had been pretty extensive, while his intelligence would have insured him a position in society above that of a labouring man... I could not help looking upon it as a very novel experience, for even this grotesque world, to have to listen to a man who could delight in a literary discussion, quote all the choice parts of Pope's "Illiad", and boast of having read Pascal and Lafontaine in the original, maintain, in sober argument, that "thieving was an honourable pursuit", and that religion, law, patriotism and bodily disease were the real and only enemies of humanity.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book, Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [unknown novel]

[Carlyle tells how he was trying to write a learned exegesis and came to a dead halt] 'One cannot long be idle - you will not wonder that I took up the first book that came in my way - and tho' it was the dullest of all dull books, yet by a fatality attendant on those things, I could not give it up. It purported to be a "history of a lover" - showing how Cecilia (somebody) being poor but honest went to Paris, with some Brandy Irish Dowager (of Tipperary) and was much astounded at their goings on - yet very much liked by the beaux. Shewing how after divers trials and temptations she married with a lord (something) who had been a very great rascal in his early days but was now become a most delectable personage; how the[y] lived in great harmony of souls till the honest man one day riding on som[e] wold and happening to fall from his beast in the presence of this notable lady, she fell into hystericks or convulsions and was taken home in a wo[e]ful plight - where she loitered on till she was "brought to bed", when she took her leave of the good man and all the world - Would you believe me, I read & read this horrid story & might have been reading yet had not a most dolorous ode to Matrimonial - no "Monody on the Death of a beloved" &c compelled me to throw past the book; and set to writing you a letter.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carlyle      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [an Italian Grammar]

'I had almost forgotten to thank [you] for my books - they are just such as I wanted. "Blair" is an excellent piece - and very cheap. I am only sorry you sent it at all: I was in no particular want of it & you ought certainly to have done with the money whatever your situation required. - One is apt to be put about, when obliged to equip for such an expedition as yours. - The Italian grammar is hardly calculated for me - but answers in the mean time. The Novelle morale is an excellent book for the purpose'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carlyle      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : The Sale Room

'A variety of works have been begun about the new year (as is the fashion) in the "periodical line". A weekly newspaper the "Scotsman" has reached the third number. I have seen them all - a little violent in their Whiggism; but well enough written in some places. Pillans & Jeffrey & Moncrieff and many others have been respectively named as the Editor. There is also a weekly essay "The Sale Room" begun about six weeks ago - by whom, I know not. The writers are not without abilities; but the last numbers seemed to indicate that the work was about to give up the ghost.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carlyle      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : The Dissenter Tripped Up

I console myself with Doddridge's Expositor and "The Scholar Armed", to say nothing of a very popular book called "The Dissenter tripped up".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sydney Smith      

  

[unknown] : [the barren fig tree]

Short way into the voyage, surgeon receives a letter from one of the convicts: 'He then mentions the influence which the perusal since he came on board of some treatise on the "barren fig tree" had produced upon his mind - the insight it had given him into his character, and then alludes to some of the great and precious promises of the gospel; especially to those contained in Matt xi the chapter we had read in our usual course the proceeding evening. He makes also grateful reference to the first chapter of the prophecies of Isaiah.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Finished a review of Cicero's tract "De Officiis"...'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Green      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [evidence of Elgin Marble Committee]

'I speak of books as I read them, and I read them as I can get them. You are read up to twelve o' clock of the preceding day, and therefore must pardon the staleness of my subjects. I read yesterday the evidence of the Elgin Marble Committee. Lord Elgin has done a very useful thing in taking them away from the Turks. Do not throw pearls to swine; and take them away from swine when they are so thrown. They would have been destroyed there, or the French would have had them'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sydney Smith      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : The Beacon

'You must have had a lively time at Edinburgh from this "Beacon". But Edinburgh is rather too small for such explosions, where the conspirators and conspired against must be guests at the same board, and sleep under the same roof. The articles upon Madame de Stael and upon Wilks's Protestants appear to me to be very good. The article upon Scotch juries is surely too long'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sydney Smith      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [work in Italian]

'after dinner read l'esprit des nations 132 Shelley read[s] Italian - read 15 lines of Ovids metamo[r]phosis with Hogg - [italics to indicate Shelley's hand] The Assassins - Gibbon Chap. LXIV - all that can be known of the assassins is to be found in Memoires of the Acad[e]my of Inscriptions tom. xvii p127-170'.[end italics]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Percy Bysshe Shelley      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [a novel]

'Shelley reads Plutarch in Greek - Lord B - comes down & stays here an hour - I read a novel in the evening'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Godwin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Le Criminel Secret

'[italics to indicate Percy Shelley's hand] Still at Havre - engage a passage - wind contrary [end italics] - read "le crimenel secret" which is a very curious and striking book'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Godwin      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : Memoirs of Oliver Cromwell and his children, supposed to be written by himself

'Read Patronage & the Milesian chief - finish 5th vol of Clarendon - Shelley reads life of Cromwell'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Percy Bysshe Shelley      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Memoirs of Oliver Cromwell and his children, supposed to be written by himself

'Finish Milesian & Patronage - read Holcrofts travels - S. reads life of Cromwell.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Percy Bysshe Shelley      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Discourse on the River Thames]

'I went therefore to Mr Boreman's for pastime, and stayed an hour or two, talking with him and reading a discourse about the River of Thames the reason of its being choked up in several places'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'He set me down at Mr Gawden's, where nobody yet come home... So I took a book and into the gardens and there walked and read till dark - with great pleasure'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [epitaph on memorial stone]

'And so to the Chapel and there saw, among other things, Sir H. Wottons stone, with this Epitaph - "Hic Jacet primus hujus Sententiae Author. Disputandi pruritus fit ecclesiae scabies." But unfortunately, the word "Author" was wrong writ, and now so basely altered, that it disgraces the stone.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Manuscript: Graffito

  

[unknown] : Bill of mortality

'But blessed be God, a good Bill this week we have - being but 237 in all and 42 of the plague, and of them, but 6 in the City - though my Lord Brouncker says that these 6 are most of them in new parishes, where they were not the last week.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Broadsheet, Handbill, Poster

  

[unknown] : [old voyages]

'write - read old voyages.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Godwin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Thence to the Exchange, that is, the New Exchange, and looked over some play-books, and entended to get all the late new plays.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Anon to Sir W. Penn to bed, and made my boy Tom to read me asleep.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Tom      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I to dinner, and thence to my chamber to read, and so to the office'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so to supper and to read, and so to bed'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and then I home to supper, and to read a little and to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so after supper and reading a little, and my wife's cutting off my hair short, which is grown too long upon the crown of my head, I to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [petty-warrants]

'and I read the petty-warrants all the day till late at night, that I was very weary, and troubled to have my private business of my office stopped to attend this - but mightily pleased at this falling out.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Manuscript: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so to my chamber, having little left to do at my office, my eyes being a little sore by reason of my reading a small printed book the other day after it was dark'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so after supper to read and then to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so a little at the office and home, to read a little and to supper and bed'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [table-book]

'and at noon all of us to Kent's at the Three Tun tavern and there dined well at Mr Gawden's charge. There the constable of the parish did show us the picklocks and dice that were found in the dead man's pockets, and but 18d in money - and a table-book, wherein were entered the names of several places where he was to go'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Manuscript: table-book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so to supper, and after a little reading, to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [History of the French Revolution]

'Read Pliny - work - Shelley read[s] Hist. French Revolution.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Percy Bysshe Shelley      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [trial of Watson, surgeon accused f high treason]

'finish 2nd book of Tacitus and read Buffon's Hist. Nat. - S. reads Arrian - Watson acquitted - read his trial'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Shelley      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [Italian operas]

'Read Italian operas - Montaigne'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Shelley      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After supper, I to read and then to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and thence home, where to supper and then to read a little; and so to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'And so home and there to the office a little; and thence to my chamber to read and supper, and to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : A dialogue concerning the rights of His Most Christian Majesty

'This day I read (shown me by Mr Gibson) a discourse newly come forth, of the King of France his pretence to Flanders; which is a very fine discourse, and the turth is, hath so much of the Civil Law in it that I am not a fit judge of it; but as it appears to me, he hath a good pretence to it by right of his Queene. So to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and then home to my chamber to read and write; and then to supper and to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [order of council]

'Fen read me an order of council passed the 17th instant, directing all the Treasurers of any part of the King's revenue to make no payments but such as shall be approved by the present Lord Commissioners; which will, I think, spoil the credit of his Majesty's service, when people cannot depend upon payment anywhere.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Fen      Manuscript: Unknown

  

[unknown] : Cabala, sive Scrinia Sacra

'and Creed did also repeat to me some of the substance of letters of old Burleigh in Queen Elizabeth's time which he hath of late read in the printed "Cabbala", which is very fine style at this day and fit to be imitated.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: John Creed      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so we home to supper, and I read myself asleep and so to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so home to supper and to read myself asleep, and then to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and then to my chamber to read, and so to bed'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so home and to my chamber to read; and then to supper and to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and I home to supper and to read a little and then to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so home, and after some little reading in my chamber, to supper and to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and then home and to my chamber to read'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Relazione della morte famiglia Cenci sequita in Roma il di 11 Maggio 1599

'Finish copying the Cenci'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Shelley      Manuscript: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so to my chamber, and got her to read to me for saving of my eyes'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : London's Flames, or The discovery of such evidence as were deposed before the Committee of Parliament etc, with the insolences of the Popish party

'Here I also saw a printed account of the examinations taking touching the burning of the City of London, showing the plots of the papists therein; which it seems hath been ordered and hath been burnt by the hands of the hangman in Westminster Palace - I will try to get one of them.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so parted and to bed - after my wife had read something to me (to save my eyes) in a good book.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'In the evening read [a] good book, my wife to me'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and then home without strangers to dinner, and then my wife to read, and then I to the office'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and then home to supper and my wife to read; and then to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Then home to read, sup and to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and when came home there, I got my wife to read'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After dinner, up to my wife again, who is in great pain still with her tooth and cheek; and there, they gone, I spent most of the afternoon and night reading and talking to bear her company, and so to supper and to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'And so it growing night, I away home by coach, and there set my wife to read'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so I walked away homeward, and there reading all the evening; and so to bed'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'So he gone, I to read a little in my chamber, and so to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and then to my chamber and read most of the evening till pretty late, when, my wife not being well, I did lie below stairs in our great chamber'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'He gone, we home and there I to read, and my belly being full of my dinner today, I anon to bed'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so home to supper and to read, and then to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and there took a hackney and home and there to read and talk with my wife'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and she being gone, I to my chamber to read a little again, and then after supper to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so home, and there spent the evening making Balty read to me; and so to supper and to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Balthasar St Michael      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [street ballads]

'But Lord, to see among the young commanders and Tho Killigrew and others that came, how unlike a burial this was, Obrian taking out some ballets from his pocket, which I read and the rest came about me to hear; and there very merry we were all, they being new ballets.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Broadsheet, Handbill

  

[unknown] : Mustapha

'And in the evening betimes came to Reding and there heard my wife read more of "Mustapha".'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and then home - and there to get my wife to read to me till supper, and then to bed'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and then at night, my wife to read again and to supper and to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Thence walked to Barne elmes; and there, and going and coming, did make the boy read to me several things, being nowadays unable to read myself anything for above two lines together but my eyes grow weary.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so to bed, after hearing my wife read a little.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Principal Officer's instructions

'Thence home and there with Mr Hater and W Hewer late, reading over all the Principal Officers' instructions in order to my great work upon my hand.'

Unknown
Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      

  

[unknown] : [paper on the faults of the Navy]

'and the Duke of York and Wren and I, it being now candle-light, into the Duke of York's closet in White-hall and there read over this paper of my Lord Keeper's; wherein is laid down the faults of the Navy, so silly and the remedies so ridiculous, or else the same that are now already provided, that we thought it not to need any answer, the Duke of York being able himself to do it'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Manuscript: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [paper on the faults of the Navy]

'and the Duke of York and Wren and I, it being now candle-light, into the Duke of York's closet in White-hall and there read over this paper of my Lord Keeper's; wherein is laid down the faults of the Navy, so silly and the remedies so ridiculous, or else the same that are now already provided, that we thought it not to need any answer, the Duke of York being able himself to do it'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Matthew Wren      Manuscript: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [paper on the faults of the Navy]

'and the Duke of York and Wren and I, it being now candle-light, into the Duke of York's closet in White-hall and there read over this paper of my Lord Keeper's; wherein is laid down the faults of the Navy, so silly and the remedies so ridiculous, or else the same that are now already provided, that we thought it not to need any answer, the Duke of York being able himself to do it'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: James, Duke of York      Manuscript: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [draft of the victualler's contract]

'and so W. Penn and Lord Brouncker and I at the lodging of the latter to read over our new draft of the victualler's contract'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Manuscript: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [draft of the victualler's contract]

'and so W. Penn and Lord Brouncker and I at the lodging of the latter to read over our new draft of the victualler's contract'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Sir William Penn      Manuscript: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [draft of the victualler's contract]

'and so W. Penn and Lord Brouncker and I at the lodging of the latter to read over our new draft of the victualler's contract'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Lord Brouncker      Manuscript: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [book of warrants in Cromwell's war, 1652-4]

'And coming back I spent reading of the book of warrants of our office in the first Dutch war, and do find that my letters and warrants and method will be found another-gate's business than this that the world so much adores - and I am glad for my own sake to find it so.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Manuscript: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'My boy was with me, and read to me all day'

Unknown
Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'And so home and to my business, and to read again and to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and away home myself, and there to read again and sup with Gibson; and so to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'So to supper, and the boy to read to me, and so to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'So back home to supper, and made my boy read to me a while, and then to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'And so back to my chamber, the boy to read to me; and so to supper and to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so home to supper, and the boy to read to me; and so to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'And so to hear my boy read a little, and supper and to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'So home to read and sup; and to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and then they gone, and my wife to read to me, and to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so home and did get my wife to read to me'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Thence with W. Penn home, and there to get my people to read and to supper and so to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so home and to supper, and got my wife to read to me and so to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and we home to supper, and my wife to read to me and so to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and in the evening home, and there made my wife read till supper time, and so to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so home, and my wife to read to me; and then with much content to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and after dinner, all the afternoon got my wife and boy to read to me.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and after dinner, all the afternoon got my wife and boy to read to me.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and my wife to read to me all the afternoon'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'So to read and talk with my wife, till by and by called to the office'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so made the boy read to me'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'And so in to solace myself with my wife, whom I got to read to me, and so W. Hewer and the boy'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and then with comfort to sit with my wife, and get her to read to me'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and then home, where my wife to read to me; and so to supper and to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and thence home, and my wife to read to me and W. Hewer to set some matters of accounts right at my chamber; to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and then home to ease my eyes and make my wife read to me.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so home, and with W. Hewer with me, to read and talk'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: William Hewer      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'So home, and there to talk and my wife to read to me, and so to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'In the evening, he gone, my wife to read to me and talk, and spent the evening with much pleasure; and so to supper and to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so home, with much pleasure talking and then to reading; and so to supper and to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'So home and to supper and read'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so home, and there with pleasure to read and talk'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so my wife and I spent the rest of the evening in talk and reading, and so with great pleasure to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and to dinner and then to read and talk, my wife and I alone'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so home and to supper and read'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so home with my wife, who read to me late; and so to supper and to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and there to read and talk with my wife, and so to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so to read and to supper, and so to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so took my wife home, and there to make her to read, and then to supper and to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and home, my wife to read to me'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and then home to supper with my wife, and to get her to read to me.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Le commerce honourable ou Considerations Politiques OR Relation de l'establissement de la Compagnie Fran?oise pour le commerce des Indes Orientales

'and I spent all afternoon with my wife and W. Battelier talking and then making them read, and perticularly made an end of Mr Boyl's book of Formes, which I am glad to have over; and then fell to read a French discourse which he hath brought over with him for me, to invite the people of France to apply themselfs to Navigacion; which it doth do very well, and is certainly their interest, and what will undo us in a few years if the King of France goes on to fit up his Navy and encrease it and his trade, as he hath begun.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: William Battelier      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and after dinner, to get my wife and boy, one after another, to read to me - and so spent the afternoon and evening'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and after dinner, to get my wife and boy, one after another, to read to me - and so spent the afternoon and evening'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'And so home to supper, and get my wife to read to me, and then to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I away home; and there spent the evening talking and reading with my wife and Mr Pelling'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and then home to my wife to read to me, and to bed'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and then home, and there my wife to read to me, my eyes being sensibly hurt by the too great lights of the playhouse.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'So home, and my wife read to me till supper, and to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'So down to supper, and she to read to me, and then with all possible kindness to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and my wife to read to me, and then to bed in mighty good humour, but for my eyes.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Report of the reforming commission of 1618]

'Up, and to my office with Tom, whom I made read to me the books of Propositions in the time of the Grand Commission, which I did read a good part of before church'

Unknown
Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Tom Edwards      

  

[unknown] : [Report of the reforming commission of 1618]

'and I to my office and there made an end of the books of Proposicions; which did please me mightily to hear read, they being excellently writ and much to the purpose, and yet so as I think I shall make good use of in defence of our present constitution.'

Unknown
Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Tom Edwards [?]      

  

[unknown] : [documents on the history of the Navy]

'and so spent the whole morning with W. Hewer, he taking little notes in short-hand, while I hired a clerk to read to me about twelve or more several rolls which I did call for'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Manuscript: Roll

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'So home, and did get my wife to read, and so to supper and to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'At night, my wife to read to me and then to supper'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so home, where got my wife to read to me, and so after supper to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'So home, and there to my chamber and got my wife to read to me a little'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so away, back by water home, and after dinner got my wife to read'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

R.A., alias J.F.: 'He [uncle] sent me to an excellent school where I stayed two years. After leaving school I perused a vast number of novels and romances. I hardly ever went out of doors. I lived in a land of dreams. I was put to various occupations but nothing could please my fancy; at last I was bound to a surgeon, and while in his service I got entangled with bad associates.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: R.A.      Print: Book, Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

S.G., transport convict writing from Portsmouth: 'During my stay at Pentonville I was, comparatively speaking, comfortable ... Mr Kingsmill was particularly kind in lending me some excellent books, in which I took great delight.'

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: S.G.      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

Extracts from the journal of Joseph Kingsmill: 30 October: 'A very deaf prisoner was allowed a visit today from his friends in the same room. I permitted the visit to take place in my office, and hearing the poor man tell his friends of his great progress in reading, I gave him a book to read for them. They were quite surprised. It was extremely hard, certainly, to teach him; but he was very persevering, and now is enjoying the comfort of it.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

Visit from cell to cell: '2. A vagrant tumbler, and low thief - naturally very shrewd, but from his habits of life, and some bad falls on his head, very odd - approaching to derrangement. He has made great progress in books, and has imbibed religious knowledge almost too rapidly, - he is very exciteable on this subject.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [book on the Protestant martyrs]

Visit from cell to cell: '15. A farm labourer, of good capacity, who, having mastered here the alphabet and the art of reading, had from the library an account of our Protestant martyrs, and being much interested in the subject, asked me several questions in relation to them; one was, whether I knew Master Ridley?'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [novels]

Causes of their own crime, stated by convicts: '37. I became acquainted with some young fellows who had less regard for Sunday than I had been accustomed to. By degrees, I went once, instead of twice, to chapel; then I got fond of theatres - going, perhaps, once or twice a week; then came public houses, a distaste for religion, novel reading, Sunday newspapers, and an ardent desire to see what is termed "London Life", - that is, scenes of profligacy and vice.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book, Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [novels and romances]

Causes of their own crime, stated by convicts: '41. Low company, a harsh schoolmaster, attending theatres, reading novels, romances, etc.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book, Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Went to the Mechanics Reading Room for a short time but could not compose my mind to profit much by the Books or Papers.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [playbill]

'I saw by the Bills that The Stranger was to be played to-night and as in duty bound I went to fulfil my promise to Mrs Poole.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Handbill, Poster, playbill

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Before returning home I went to the Reading Room of the Mechanics Institute where after indulging in a little very light reading I returned home.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Peeped in at the Mechanics and read a book for half an hour.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Mather called about 7 o clock, went with him to get a cup of coffee at Purcells, and afterwards he accompanied me to the Mechanics where we read for a short time.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Mather called about 7 o clock, went with him to get a cup of coffee at Purcells, and afterwards he accompanied me to the Mechanics where we read for a short time.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mather      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'In the evening I called at the Mechanics and after reading for a little time went upstairs and heard a lecture by Dr Palmer on the Education of the Masses.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [magazines]

'In the evening spent a very pleasant hour in the Reading Room of the Mechanics looking over the Magazines that arrived by the "Blue Jacket".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : Blackwood's Magazine

'Spent the evening at the Mechanics, read a Review in Blackwood of Barnum's work "The Life of a Showman" the critic shows no mercy & really the book is such an impudent acknowledgement of chicanery & deception that it richly deserves the castigation it receives, particularly as the Author after glorying in the possession of a large fortune made by gulling the public with a manufactured mermaid & even more unpardonable trickeries snuffles cant & professes piety.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read for an hour at the Mechanics.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Rather a dirty day, it being a holiday out of doors I felt lazily inclined myself & did nothing but read during the day.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read for an hour at the Mechanics Institute in the evening & afterwards went over the New Theatre.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I read for half an hour at the Mechanics. This was the first part of the evening.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Felt in a very miserable mood during the evening, took a stroll had a peep into the library of the Mechanics Institution & then went to the Hall of the Criterion Hotel where there is a Promenade Concert nightly.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read for a time at the Mechanics Institute had some soup at William's restaurant & went to bed about ten o clock.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read for a short time at the Mechanics, afterwards met Mr Read went home with him and chatted for an hour or so then came back and got to bed before ten o clock.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read the papers at the Mechanics Institute.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Came home took tea read a little thought a little yawned a great deal and then spite of the rain went out.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [newspapers]

'Read the papers at the Mechanics.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Newspaper

  

[unknown] : [newspapers]

'After I had been in bed two or three hours I woke finding the room shaking very much. I at first fancied some one was walking across the adjacent apartment & then that some heavy wagon was rumbling along the street. I turned round & soon went to sleep after I found nothing was the matter & on seeing the next morning's newspaper found the shock of an earthquake reported.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Newspaper

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read for half an hour at the Mechanics.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read for an hour at the Mechanics Institution, walked round the town & got home to bed before ten o clock.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [newspapers]

'Read the papers at the Mechanics Institution.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Newspaper

  

[unknown] : [newspapers]

'After Tea I took a stroll called in at the Mechanics Institution & read the Papers, went down to the Royal, met Day & had a chat with him.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Newspaper

  

[unknown] : [newspapers]

'After four o clock took a stroll, read the papers at the Mechanics & then called at Joe's Office.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Newspaper

  

[unknown] : Argus

'Saw Mr Mather, he told me there's (sic) was a letter in the Argus about my establishment. I went with him to his quarters to see the paper, and got home about eleven o clock.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Newspaper

  

[unknown] : Argus

'The Argus printed this morning a very stinging article upon the Melbourne Police Bench and was especially severe upon the Mayor, attributing his late Ball as a bait thrown to catch the mayoralty again for the next year.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Newspaper

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Came home, read from my new purchases for an hour & went to bed'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Sat Reading till twelve o clock then went to bed.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Neild took tea with me & sat talking & reading during the evening.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Neild took tea with me & sat talking & reading during the evening.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mr Neild      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'We went for a stroll about nine & continued walking till a little past ten. Came home then & after reading a short time went to bed.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : prayers

'The Rev Mr Corrie read prayers to & then addressed the protestant prisoners.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mr Corrie      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Had very little work to do to day & employed myself in Reading & writing.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [French Grammar]

'Employed myself during the day in reading & studying the French Grammar, as we are to have a lesson from Lefarge this evening.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Spent the evening at home in reading & writing.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [newspaper cutting]

'Received a letter from Emma and some papers from Joe. In Emma's letter there was an Extraordinary published by one of the Melbourne papers which contained the news of the Arrival of the Red Jacket. It was only published a short time before the Mail closed, so I thought the Papers here would not have it. They had however but yet I gave it to Nixon the Editor of The Constitution as a pledge silent but doubtless intended that I should not spoil the Sale of the Extraordinary which he intended to publish by showing it to any more people. The Conductors of the other Paper heard of my having news and came eagerly to see what I had got & were very crestfallen when I told them what had become of my "Paper".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Newspaper

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Spent the evening at home doing nothing except lazily read & write.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [newspapers]

'Received three newspapers & Punch all from Neild. The newspapers contained an account of a Performance by the Garrick Club. It appears to have been as successful as any of the former performances and to have been honored by a large audience.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Newspaper

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'In the evening I read a little & so got bedtime to come round.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Stayed at home and amused myself with reading & sleeping at intervals during the evening. Went very early to bed.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Spent the evening at home, amused myself with reading.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Transacted ordinary business during the day & spent the evening at home lazily reading a book.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Ovens and Murray Advertiser

'The Ovens & Murray advertiser in its impression of this day announced Mr Cameron to be the successful candidate by a majority of upwards of [?] over his opponents.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Newspaper

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'In the evening walked as far as Martin's with Mr Murphy. Returned read while & then went to bed.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'came back to Beechworth saw all was right in the Gaol, and sat down quietly to read a Book.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Vita di Alfieri

'Read Vita di Alfieri - & Livy - S. goes to Padua - Reads Cymbeline to me in the evening'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Shelley      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Life of Virgil

'Read the life of Virgil'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Shelley      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'The evening was remarkably wet and there was no alternative but to stay at home. I read a little smoked a little drank a little thought a little and then saw all was right in the Gaol and went to bed.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [a tale in] Bibliotheque Universelle des Dames

'Read Huon de Bourdeaux a Roman de la Chevalerie'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Shelley      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [tales in] Bibliotheque universelle des dames

'Read Livy - and Romans Chevaleresques'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Shelley      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [tales in] Bibliotheque universelle des dames

'Read Bib. de Chevalerie'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Shelley      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Jeremiah

'S reads Las Casas & Jeremiah aloud. read the F. of the bees'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Percy Bysshe Shelley      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Write - Read - I am sure I forget what'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Shelley      

  

[unknown] : [possibly] A copy of the Queen's Letter to the King. To which are added, copies of their correspondence since the period of their separation. And the Queen's Character.

'Muratori - Greek - Queen's Letter - K.[ing] Swellfoot'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Shelley      

  

[unknown] : [books on Ireland]

'Muratori - greek - Irish books'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Shelley      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Ancient Greek works]

'read greek - read Mackenzies works'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Shelley      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Greek texts]

' I mark this day because I begin my Greek again - and that is a study which ever delights me - I do not feel the bore of it as in learning another language although it be so difficult - it so richly repays one. Yet I read little for I am not well.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Shelley      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I thought I heard My Shelley call me - Not my Shelley in Heaven - but My Shelley - my companion in my Daily tasks - I was reading - I heard a voice say "Mary" - "It is Shelley" I thought - the revulsion was of agony - Never more shall I hear his beloved voice'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Shelley      

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I endeavour to read & write - my ideas a [for 'are'] stagnate and my understanding refuses to follow the words I read'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Shelley      

  

[unknown] : [advertisement]

'In the month of July 1842, as I was passing the site of the Royal Exchange, then in course of re-erection after being burnt down, my attention was caught by one of the very numerous bills with which the boards, at that time surrounding it, were covered: it ran thus - "Susan Hopley; or the Life of a Maid Servant". This book, I thought to myself, must be a novelty...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Ann Ashford      Print: Advertisement, Broadsheet, Poster

  

[unknown] : [newspapers]

'for although female servants form a large class of Her Majesty's subjects, I have seen but little of them or their affairs in print: sometimes, indeed, a few stray deliquents, from their vast numbers, find their way into the police reports of the newspapers; and in penny tracts, now and then, a "Mary Smith" or "Susan Jones" is introduced, in the last stage of consumption, or some other lingering disease, of which they die, in a heavenly frame of mind and are duly interred.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Ann Ashford      Print: Newspaper

  

[unknown] : [tracts published by the Religious Tract Society]

'for although female servants form a large class of Her Majesty's subjects, I have seen but little of them or their affairs in print: sometimes, indeed, a few stray deliquents, from their vast numbers, find their way into the police reports of the newspapers; and in penny tracts, now and then, a "Mary Smith" or "Susan Jones" is introduced, in the last stage of consumption, or some other lingering disease, of which they die, in a heavenly frame of mind and are duly interred.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Ann Ashford      Print: Broadsheet

  

[unknown] : [history]

'She often talked to us of her studies as a girl; how she used not only to devour novels and read Sir Charles Grandison every winter, but how she also taught herself a little French, learned by heart long passsages from the great poets, sometimes read history, and especially delighted in Bayley's Dictionary, with its long meanings and rules for pronunciation'.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Jane Edwards      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [great poets' works]

'She often talked to us of her studies as a girl; how she used not only to devour novels and read Sir Charles Grandison every winter, but how she also taught herself a little French, learned by heart long passsages from the great poets, sometimes read history, and especially delighted in Bayley's Dictionary, with its long meanings and rules for pronunciation'.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Jane Edwards      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : History of Montezuma

'when we went to bed she [Sewell's mother] would go upstairs with us and read to us whilst we were being undressed, because she did not like us to run the risk of being frightened by ghost stories told by the nursery-maids, as she had been once frightened herself. I can recall now the pleasure with which (taking my turn with my sisters) I used to jump up into her lap and listen whilst she read to us "Anson's Voyages", or "Lemrier's Tour to Morocco", or the "History of Montezuma". When she had finished, we all, kneeling around her, said our prayers and went to bed happy.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Jane Sewell      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'We formed a book-club amongst ourselves, chose and purchased some special favourite, or one which we heard praised, read it in turn, and then sold it by auction'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Missing Sewell and school friends     Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [History of Venetian Doges]

'I used to study by myself, for I knew that I was wofully ignorant. Such books as Russell's "History of Modern Europe" and Robertson's "Charles the Fifth", I read, and also Watts on the "Improvement of the Mind", and I plodded through an Italian history of the Venetian Doges, lent me by an intimate and valued friend of my father, Mr Turnbull'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Missing Sewell      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [a Spanish grammar]

'I taught myself besides to read Spanish - for having found a Spanish "Don Quixote" lying about, which no-one claimed, I took possession of it, bought a grammar and dictionary, and set to work to master the contents of the book which I knew so well by name'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Missing Sewell      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [a Spanish dictionary]

'I taught myself besides to read Spanish - for having found a Spanish "Don Quixote" lying about, which no-one claimed, I took possession of it, bought a grammar and dictionary, and set to work to master the contents of the book which I knew so well by name'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Missing Sewell      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Linnaean botany book]

'The elements of botany on the Linnaean system was another of my attempted acquirements, but I am afraid my studies were very superficial: I knew nothing perfectly, but I read everything that came in my way. There was an excellent town library in Newport, from which I could get any good modern works; and, besides the graver literature, I had always some lighter book on hand, and especially delighted in Walter Scott's novels and poetry. Byron, too, was a great favourite'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Missing Sewell      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Oxford Movement sermons]

'My sisters and I had a volume of the sermons given by an Oxford friend of our brother William; but it was with the caution that there were two sermons which it was better for us not to read. The prohibition was ultimately taken off, but not till our friend had made up his mind that we were not likely to have our minds disturbed by the new teaching, which was extemely stern, and likely in some cases to be discouraging.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth M. Sewell and her sisters     Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Life of Stephen Langton

'We had a wet day yesterday, and amused ourselves with reading aloud "The Life of Stephen Langton" in "The Lives of the English Saints" (These lives were small biographies written by the more extreme members of the Oxford party.) It is well written and interesting, but I cannot go with it Thomas a Becket is no saint to my mind, and I dislike the uncalled-for hits at the Reformation'. [text in parenthesis added by the author or editor, it is unclear which, when turning journal text into publishable material]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Missing Sewell      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [pamphlets and magazines]

'I have written a little, and read a good deal, - the second volume of "Sir Charles Metcalfe's Life", which makes me look upon him as more of a hero than many whom Carlyle would worship; and "Hypatia" and two sermons of Dr Pusey's against Germanism, and part of "Hero Worship", to say nothing of pamphlets and magazines, and a diligent study of "The Times" every evening. "Hypatia" is a marvel; very painful because it gives such a miserable view of Christianity in those days. In striving to be true, the description seems as if it must be untrue, even by its own acknowledgment. There must have been self-denial and faith, and charity working beneath those turbulent outward scenes. Yet it gives one no sympathy with philosophy. Mrs Meyrick and I both agree that "Pelagia" wins our affection much more than "Hypatia".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Missing Sewell      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : Monthly Review [review of Southey's "The Curse of Kehama"]

'Have you (I forget whether you ever told me) read the Curse of Kahama [sic]? I have seen two Reviews of it, & now so well understand what it all seems to be about, I should like mightily to read the whole'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sarah Harriet Burney      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : Quarterly Review [review of Southey's "The Curse of Kehama"]

'Have you (I forget whether you ever told me) read the Curse of Kahama [sic]? I have seen two Reviews of it, & now so well understand what it all seems to be about, I should like mightily to read the whole'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sarah Harriet Burney      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [review of Pierre Jouhaud, "Paris dans le dix-neuvieme siecle"]

'A book that I am sure would amuse Barrett, and perhaps you also, very much, is [underlined] Jouhaud's Paris dans le dixneuvieme Siecle [end underlining]. The account of it made me extremely desirous to see it. There are in it descriptions of the present Parisien world - the state of Religion, of society, of amusements, of schools, fashions &c, &c - And all appears fairly done, and in a manly unaffected manner. pate le 3eme [a little hand points to an ink blot] I should like also excessively to see [underlined] Catteau's Voyage en Allemagne et Suede. [end underlining] The little I read about it, has made me so fond of the Swedes! Not the Swedish nobles, but the tiers etat; the farmers, landholders and peasantry: they resemble the Swiss at their best; but appear still more carefully educated at their provincial schools, and are quite dear things.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sarah Harriet Burney      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [review of Jean-Pierre-Guillaume Catteau-Calleville, Voyage en Allemagne et en Suede]

'A book that I am sure would amuse Barrett, and perhaps you also, very much, is [underlined] Jouhaud's Paris dans le dixneuvieme Siecle [end underlining]. The account of it made me extremely desirous to see it. There are in it descriptions of the present Parisien world - the state of Religion, of society, of amusements, of schools, fashions &c, &c - And all appears fairly done, and in a manly unaffected manner. pate le 3eme [a little hand points to an ink blot] I should like also excessively to see [underlined] Catteau's Voyage en Allemagne et Suede. [end underlining] The little I read about it, has made me so fond of the Swedes! Not the Swedish nobles, but the tiers etat; the farmers, landholders and peasantry: they resemble the Swiss at their best; but appear still more carefully educated at their provincial schools, and are quite dear things.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sarah Harriet Burney      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [Story of Perseus]

'Her reading as a child was voracious, although her late start in learning to read for herself left her with a cosy taste for being read to. Her governess hads read aloud to her the story of Perseus and "Jungle Jinks" and most things in between. Once she read for herself, she had a passion for George Macdonald: his Curdie was one of her heroes. She loved Baroness Orczy's "Scarlet Pimpernel", and E. Nesbit's books. She read Dickens exhaustively as a child and, as a result, could not read him as a young adult: "There is no more oxygen left, for me, anywhere in the atmosphere of his writings".'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Bowen      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [detective stories]

'The only above-board children's stories for grown-ups, she thought, were detective stories, and those she read for pure pleasure all her life'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Bowen      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

[having been given a rum and peppermint liqueur for a migraine] 'We went to the Railway waiting-room, which was all quiet and nicely-lighted up; so Flossy began to read a book she had brought with her; and I got Hendschel's Telegraph (the German Bradshaw) off the table, and began to puzzle out my train to Strasbourg to meet Louy, - when, lo & behold, Flossy whispered to me, me, smelling of rum - that Mr Bosanquet had come in! I tucked my head down over my book, & told F.E. to take no notice; but he drew nearer and nearer, pretending to look at the affiches on the walls, until at last he came close, & said 'Mrs G. can I assist you in making out yr train'...'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Florence Elizabeth Gaskell      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Blackwood's Magazine

'I'll change my tactics [from trying to persuade Blackwood to give her a copy of "Adam Bede" out of generosity] and say you owe me compensation for an article {of} under which if the wit had been a tithe equal to the wish to abuse I might have winced with pain. As it was I only felt indignant at the bad spirit in which the review of my Life of Charlotte Bronte was written, & half inclined to offer my services to Mr Aytoun the next time he wished to have an article written which should point out with something like keen and bitter perception the short-comings of my books'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [American cookery books]

'Yes! I found the American cookery books here when we got home, (Decr 20th) and many many thanks. we can't understand all the words used - because, you see, [italics] we [end italics] speak English, - but we have made some capital brown bread and several other good things, by the help of them'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Meta is turning out such a noble beautiful character - Her intellect and her soul, (or wherever is the part in which piety & virtue live) are keeping pace, as they should do - She works away at German & Greek - reads carefully many books, - with a fineness of perception & relish which delights me...'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Emily Gaskell      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I forgot to tell you that Meta reads with & teaches Elliot every night'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Emily Gaskell      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'[Meta] has a little orphan boy to teach French to, reads with Elliot every night, etc: etc: and has always more books she [is] wanting to read than she can get through, being a very slow reader.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Emily Gaskell      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [review of his own 'Idylls of the King']

'No! I have not read nothing! - not even a review of Idylls of the King - only heard Mrs Norton's account of Tennyson's reading it'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Alfred, Lord Tennyson      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : Melle Mori

'Do you know by whom 'Melle Mori' is written?' [Gaskell asks George Smith the same question the same day - p.605]

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [anthology of laudatory sonnets]

'Now I had a vol: of poems sent me the other day, full of sonnets to Dickens, Carlyle &c &c - [italics] such [end italics] bad ones; & the parcel contains this book sent to her 'from the author', & my own dear precious sonnet.' [Gaskell then transcribes the sonnet, beginning 'Sweet Vocalist; the Nightingale of sound!', asking smith - facetiously? - if he would like it for the Cornhill]

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : London Guardian

'I read them an account of the Ammergau Play, out of the London Guardian that Mr Maltby had lent me; & I think they will both go to one of the Septr Representations'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell      Print: Newspaper

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Our bride & bridegroom write as if they were very happy reading law, novels, driving fishing & boating'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Florence (nee Gaskell) and Charles Crompton     Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [book on portraits of Dante]

'[she thanks the Nortons for a photograph of Lincoln and] 'the delicious book on the portraits of Dante which it is a pleasure even to open, - it, - & the faces themselves seem to carry one so [italics] up [end italics] into a ["]purer aether, a diviner air".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [a history of the French Revolution]

'[italics] Whose [end italics] history of the F. Revolution are you reading?'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Marianne Gaskell      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : ['standard works'; not novels]

'Miss Bronte in one of her letters to you (Mama [italics] thinks [end italics] written in the year 1835,) gives you some advice as to what books to read. Mama wants to know how Miss Bronte can have become acquainted with the books that she mentions to you. From Keighley Mama knows she could get novels but where such standard works as Miss Bronte refers to in her letters were obtained is a puzzle to Mama. At Haworth Mama says she did not see many books except quite new ones that had been given to Miss Bronte since she became famous. If you would kindly let her know all you know.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Charlotte Bronte      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [French]

'After dinner Meta & Flossy did their German; & I read French'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [letter to Marianne Gaskell]

'here is a letter for you, which I opened [italics] verily [end italics] by mistake at first. One came for Florence at the same time which I snatched up and I could not believe I should be equally unfortunate with the second, but when I saw yours it was irresistible to read it; quite by way of chaperonage of course, and not a bit for gossipry. However, there is not much news of any kind in it, as you will find.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell      Manuscript: Letter

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'They got dingy novels from the Caen Circg Library, & had no other books, I fancy. No wonder they "hate living abroad".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: 'the Heald girls'     Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [pamphlet]

'Read the pamphlet Mr Boswell recommended:, natural, certainly, and the man had too much provocation for his act.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Crabbe      

  

[unknown] : [Miscellany]

'Mr Blackwood the Editor of the Magazine which goes under his Name & who this Morning - in Modo Mr Murray of London - very kindly prest me to accept a Volume & a very pleasing Volume of Miscellanies which I will take with me if I live to reach Trowbridge again.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Crabbe      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [poetry]

'With your Letter I found a Parcel containing 2 vols of Poetry from a Gentleman who some time since wrote to me upon the Subject: it is rather unmerciful, but I must bear it.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Crabbe      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Travels]

'I like the books which we purchased though the Physiological Botany is rather too minute & supposes the Reader a Learner indeed. The Travels are I think really good & good humoured. Faust was not so terrific as I apprehended from the seduction of a Philosopher by an evil Spirit. I verily think that Business is conducted better (than in far more ostentatious works) in the Arabian Tales, (not Nights) where a pious old Lady is wrought upon by her Vanity into Compliance with a Devil who takes the Character of a pious old Man:I want this second part of these strange Tales & to have done with the Subject of Books I treated myself with Warton's History of Poetry: I have long wished for it, but the Quarto edition was so dear 5 that I waited for a Octavo & it is just published: it has a great deal of dull Matter but with much Information & Amusement & moreover it is in the way of my Vocation. There is a good Print of the Author & John having seen that, I believe has no wish to look a page further.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Crabbe      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [book on witchcraft trials]

'That is a curious kind of Hallucination which Miss B. discovers in her Addresses to imaginary Beings: it comes very near to a case I read, long since, in the Trials of Witches, a book wh I should like to see again'. [Crabbe outlines the witchcraft case in question]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Crabbe      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown work on religious enthusiasm]

'I am reading & have nearly read, a Work upon Enthusiasm, [the] 3d Edition, the author unknown to me, but a thinking Man of good Sense & a stedd[y] Believer in what he does believe, which is not all that imaginative people [suppose.] He thinks the spread of Christianity over the World is rapidly going on with ev[ry] Prospect of Success, & that Every Believer should be a persuader & maker of Converts as far as his Abilities & powers &c extend-'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Crabbe      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [MSS by or about Carlyle]

'A week in Edinburgh looking up Carlyle MSS before Christmas'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Antonia White      Manuscript: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [poetry]

'It is strange that in poetry, when I was eleven, I had what I can only call my first revelation from which I emerged dazed, unable to fit the two worlds together. It has happened again now with the Rilke book'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Antonia White      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : ['trash']

'At the moment, in a sense, "art" means nothing whatever to me. I cannot read (except trash) look at pictures, listen to music.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Antonia White      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : ['lives of painters']

'I read voraciously the lives of painters and the journals of poets. I am nourished and nourished but I bring forth nothing'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Antonia White      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : ['journals of poets']

'I read voraciously the lives of painters and the journals of poets. I am nourished and nourished but I bring forth nothing'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Antonia White      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [French novels]

'The clerk who cashes my cheques at the bank is quite a bright, intelligent-looking boy. To-day I had a copy of [italics] Bouvard et Pecuchet [end italics]. He looked at it with curiosity then said "I expect you think I'm rude, looking like that. But I used to read a lot of those sorts of books once" "What sort of books?" "Oh, yellow books like that. I picked up a lot in a booksellers. But mine were much bigger than that" "What were they?" "Oh I don't remember their names or what they were about" "Do you remember the authors?" "Can't say I do. I seem to remember one was some sort of a Japanese story" "And they were in French?" "Oh yes, in French of course".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [a life of George Eliot]

'I have just finished [italics] The Mill on the Floss[end italics]. Reading it and [italics] Adam Bede [end italics] have given me the most extraordinary pleasure. I begin to think George Eliot is not only the greatest English woman novelist but perhaps the greatest English novelist. She has not the fiery poetry of Emily Bronte nor the exquisite surface of Jane Austen but she has a richness and sweep and depth that is Shakespearean. The one thing that maims or constrains her a little is some rigid moral sense which goes against her [italics] natural [end italics ] morality. She is haunted by an impossible ideal of purity and strictness. In [italics] Middlemarch [end italics] and [italics] Adam Bede [end italics] she incarnates this in two women; one so impossibly good that she is repellent. I am in for a George Eliot bout as a drunkard goes on a jag. Over dinner I raced through a short life of her.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Antonia White      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Catholic texts]

'There is a peculiar flavour about Catholic writings which I still find repellent. [George] Tyrell is the only modern one with whom I feel in sympathy and he was condemned by the Church.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Antonia White      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Dreamy and compulsive lately: cram myself with reading, put off all activities'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Antonia White      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

[symptoms of depression include] 'Outward signs: maniacal reading, either pure escapism or... the search for the magic word.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Antonia White      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [writings about religion, Church History, etc]

'The more I read of theology, Church History, apologetics, philosophy, scripture interpretation, the more hopelessly at sea I find myself. I feel on firm ground with Walter H[ylton] and Dame Julian [of Norwich] and in the prayers of the Church.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Antonia White      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [poetry]

'chiefly was I charm'd and ravish'd with the Sweets of Poetry; all my Hours were dedicated to the Muses; and from a Reader, i quickly became a Writer'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Laetitia van Lewen      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [letters to Swift from various correspondents]

'[Pilkington tells how Swift cut out many pages of an edition of Horace and made her paste letters between the covers instead] 'I told him, I was extreamly proud to be honoured with his Commands: "But, Sir, may I presume to make a request to you?" "Yes", says he, "but Ten to One I shall deny it". "I hope not Sir, 'tis this; may I have Leave to read the Letters as I go on?" "Why, provided you will acknowledge yourself amply rewarded for your Trouble, I don't much care if I indulge you so far; but are you sure you can read?" "I don't know Sir, I'll try". "Well then begin with this". It was a letter from Lord [italics] Bolingbroke [end italics], Dated six o'Clock in the Morning; it began with a remark, how differently that Hour appeared to him now, rising cool, serene, and temperate, to contemplate the Beauties of Nature, to what it had done in some former Parts of his Life, when he was either in the midst of Excesses, or returning Home sated with them [Pilkington continues to summarise the 'moral philosophy' of the letter and professes herself delighted with all his other letters] Nor can I be at all surprized that Mr [italics] Pope [end italics] should so often celebrate a Genius who for sublimity of Thought, and elegance of Stile, had few Equals. The rest of the Dean's Correspondents were, the Lady [italics] Masham [end italics], the Earl of [italics] Oxford [end italics] [a long list of others, ending] Mr [italics] Pope [end italics], Mr [italics] Gay [end italics], Dr [italics] Arbuthnot [end italics]; A Noble and learned Set! So my Readers may judge what a Banquet I had. I cou'd not avoid remarking to the Dean, that notwithstanding the Friendship Mr [italics] Pope [end italics] professed for Mr [italics] Gay [end italics], he cou'd not forbear a great many Satyrical, or if I might be allowed to say so, envious Remarks on the success of the [italics] Beggar's Opera [end italics] The Dean very frankly own'd, he did not think Mr [italics] Pope [end italics] was so candid to the Merits of other Writers, as he ought to be. [cont. in a subsequent entry]'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Laetitia Pilkington      Manuscript: Letter

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

[having quoted from sermons and poetical works, including Swift, Young and her husband, on the subject of adultery Pilkington says] 'I must beg my Reader's Pardon for these numerous Quotations; but as [italics] Swift [end italics] says, those anticipating Rascals the Ancients, have left nothing for us poor Moderns to say: But still to shew my Vanity, let it stand as some sort of Praise, that I have stolen wisely'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Laetitia Pilkington      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I own myself very indiscreet in permitting any Man to be at an unseasonable Hour in my Bed-Chamber; but Lovers of Learning will, I am sure, pardon me, as I solemnly declare, it was the attractive Charms of a new Book,which the Gentleman would not lend me, but consented to stay till I read it through, that was the sole Motive of my detaining him' [the incident led to LP being divorced for adultery]

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Laetitia Pilkington      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [commendatory verses by various admirers]

'I can't but let my Readers see my Vanity, in inserting the following Poems, written to me since I came to [italics] Dublin [end italics], and do assure them, I have as many Pacquets of a Day, as a Minister of State; some praising, and some abusing me; the best of which in my Praise, I have chosen out for their Perusal' [various laudatory poems follow]

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Laetitia Pilkington      Manuscript: Letter

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'My Landlady, who was really a Gentlewoman, and he [a Gentleman LP knew from Ireland], and I diverted away the Time with Ombre, Reading, and Pratling, very tolerably'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Laetitia Pilkington      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

[Having agreed to let her landlady lodge a Dr Turnbull in her (LP's) bedchamber] 'I went up to my own Apartment, where I found the Doctor reading'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: George Turnbull      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I was going to proceed, when Mr [italics] Cibber [end italics] interrupted me; I was, said he, at the Duke of [italics] Richmond[end italics]'s last Summer, when his Daughter, a most accomplished young Lady, and a very early Riser, sat reading in a beautiful Portico, about Six in the Morning; I accosted the fair Creature, and asked her the Subject of her Contemplation? So in a most elegant, and agreeable Stile, she related to me Part of a very entertaining Novel, she held in her Hand, and, I believe, in better words than the Author wrote it.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Emilia, Lady Lennox      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I grew so melancholy at the Loss of my Companion, that I did not even care for writing, but amused myself entirely with reading; and my not having a Library of my own, made me a constant Customer to a Shop in the Neighbourhood, where they hired out Books by the Quarter'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Laetitia Pilkington      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

[Mr Rooke gives an account of his average day] 'I rise about Nine, drink Coffee, not that I like it, but that it gives a Man the Air of a Politician, for the same Reason I always read the News; - then I dress, and, about Twelve go to the [italics] Cocoa-Tree [end italics], where I talk Treason; from thence to [italics] St James's Coffee-house [end italics], where I praise the Ministry; then to [italics] White's [end italics], where I talk Gallantry; so by Three, I return home to Dinner; after that, I read about an Hour, and digest the Book and the Dinner together'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: George Rooke      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [books on Roman History]

'No sooner did the Doctor percieve [sic] that I knew [italics] Mark Anthony [end italics] from [italics] Julius Caesar [end italics], and [italics] Brutus [end italics] from both, but he related a great Part of [italics] Roman[end italics] History to me, even from the first [italics] Punic [end italics] War to the Death of [italics] Julius [end italics]. My Readers may venture to believe it was not new to me, who had from my Childhood been, if I may use the Word, a perfect Devourer of Books; and I found them both sweet to the Palate, and nourishing Food to the Mind.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Laetitia Pilkington      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [a French drinking song]

'I had the good Fortune to divert him [Lord Galway] with my comical stuff so well that he left me a Task, which was, to translate a [italics] French Chanson a boire [end italics].'

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Laetitia Pilkington      

  

[unknown] : [prison discharge document]

[various benefactors including Colley Cibber having helped her, LP is released from the Marshalsea] 'When I read over these Words, [italics] Discharge from your Custody the body of, &c. [end italics], as I was by nine Weeks Confinement, Sickness, and Fasting, rendered quite weak, the joyful Surprize made me faint away several Times, and, indeed, my kind Benefactor had like to have frustrated his own generous Design of preserving me.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Laetitia Pilkington      Manuscript: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [inscriptions]

'I wandered through the Cloysters, reading the Inscriptions till it grew duskish. I hastened to the great Gate, but was infinitely shocked to find I was locked in to the solitary Mansions of the Dead'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Laetitia Pilkington      Manuscript: Graffito

  

[unknown] : [poetry by various correspondents]

'Indeed if I had printed all the poetry that has been sent to me for that Purpose, since I came to this Kingdom, it would have proved as odd a Medley as any thing ever yet exhiited to publick View; I suppose everyone who fancied they had Wit, had a Mind to see how it would look in print, but I must beg to be excused; though the learned Mr [italics] Timothy Ticle Picker [end italics] pressed very hard for a place, it would be a strong Proof of my Vanity to insert his anti-sublime compliments to me'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Laetitia Pilkington      Manuscript: Unknown

  

[unknown] : The Parallel: Or, Pilkington and Phillips Compared, Being Remarks upon the Memoirs of those two celebrated Writers

'Just as I was writing about [italics] Worsdale [end italics] a Gentleman brought me a Pamphlet, entituled [sic], [italics] A parallel between Mrs Pilkington and Mrs Philips, written by an Oxford Scholar [end italics], as he tells us, himself, starving in a Garret: pray, Mr Scholar, deal ingenuously, did not [italics] Worsdale [end italics] hire you to writeit, because he was indolent'. [LP proceeds at length to refute the arguments of the papmhlet]

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Laetitia Pilkington      

  

[unknown] : [poems sent by admirers]

'I have had so many amorous Epistles, Odes, Songs, Anacreonticks, Saphics, Lyrics, and Pindaricks, in Praise of my Mind and Person too, sent to me since I came to [italics]Ireland [end italics]; that I believe some Gentlemen, tho' I cannot, have found me out to be a marvelous proper Womaan'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Laetitia Pilkington      Manuscript: Letter

  

[unknown] : [a review of Ford's work]

'I was greeted in the mess at breakfast today by the whole table exclaiuming: "Genius" - it appears that someone had read the British weekly which says "Mr H's literary power does not fall short of genius!" which struck them as comic'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: soldier      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [book on wild flowers]

'There is an awfully good little book on English wild flowers with good clear illustrations, but it costs 7/6. Is it worth it?'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Esther Gwendolyn, "Stella" Bowen      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [first reading]

'[Baby] is making progress with her reading & can - most times - identify the sound & the curly S & the elegant L. Perhaps she will be writing short stories by your return!'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Esther Julia Ford      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : review of Violet Hunt's 'The Flurried Years' in the New York Times]

'The only thing S.L. [Violet Hunt's memoirs] says about you, by the bye, is that I am now wandering homeless over Europe with a younger and more robust Egeria. I meant to send you the review in the N.Y. Times which contained those phrases, but I forgot it and it is impossible to get back issues of papers here.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Ford Madox Ford      Print: Newspaper

  

[unknown] : [research for a tale to be serialised in 'Collier's Weekly']

'on Saturday the English proofs of Last Post descended on me and on Monday the American one's and I literally could do nothing else as Boni's wanted the proofs back on Monday night. That however was impossible, but I got them finished yesterday and then was too exhausted to do anything. In addition I have any amount of reading to do for the Collier's serial'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Ford Madox Ford      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [research for the book that became 'A little Less than Gods']

'I have begun DEMIGODS which is the provisional title of the Ney book and what with reading up for it and worrying over it I am fair moidert'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Ford Madox Ford      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [article presumably praising Stella Bowen's exhibition of paintings]

'I was so delighted with your cutting from the Crapouillot: I am sure I must seem quite fatuous, I shew it to so many people'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Ford Madox Ford      Print: Newspaper

  

[unknown] : [research for 'A Little Less than Gods']

'I have been doing a good deal of reading for the Ney book, though it is difficult to get all the books I want'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Ford Madox Ford      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [life and letters of Gauguin]

'I lay down on my bed and tried to improve my mind, reading articles about the political situation in the Pacific Ocean - but it was rather difficult because Janice insisted on reading aloud passages from the life and letters of Gauguin, the artist.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Janice Biala      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Now half Paris is wanting to take my likeness & indeed a Spanish painter is doing it all the time while I am writing this. He sits about doing me while I work or read or play patience'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Ford Madox Ford      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [various fiction works in his father's library]

'Sydney [Larkin's father] gave him free run of his library and his appetite for books grew enormously. "Thanks to my father", he wrote later: "our house contained not only the principal works of most main English writers in some form or other (admittedly there were exceptions, like Dickens), but also nearly-complete collections of authors my father favoured - Hardy, Bennett, Wilde, Butler and Shaw, and later on Lawrence, Huxley and Katherine Mansfield".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Philip Larkin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [books in English]

'[Father] taught himself to read English almost perfectly. Mother somehow taught herself enough English to get the gist of the contents of English newspapers. Father, oddly, refused to read the English papers; I fancy he thought more highly of books. I dimly remember evenings, before mother became very ill, when she sat with him at the kitchen table while he ate his dinner, and with obvious delight read an English paper to him. She also of course read "Die Zeit", and letters in Yiddish from relatives left behind in Lithuania; these came more and more infrequently and finally died away. I suppose she never had time to read anything else'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Mr Glasser      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I spent hours, days, in the great Reading Room of the Mitchell Library. Young as I was, in my ragged shorts, frayed jersey and ill-fitting jacket, incongruous among the sleek, well-nourished university students, I became so familiar to the staff that they dubbed me, in kindly fashion, "the young professor". One day, perhaps as a piece of sympathetic magic, I looked up Einstein's massive entry in "Who's Who" and copied it out word for word, his universities, degrees, honorary doctorates, publications. I kept that transcript pasted into an exercise book, a talisman'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Ralph Glasser      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [books of biography, history, philosophy, etc]

'After I left school, the Mitchell became if possible even more important. I read widely, indiscriminately: the lives of the great philosophers and scientists, history and ideas, particularly of the Renaissance and the Enlightenment, logic. It was a halting progress, for at every step I had to make up for lack of background, of facts, of definitions, of words, and buried my nose in dictionaries and the "Encyclopaedia Britannica", which led of course to more and more sideways reading.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Ralph Glasser      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [books on politics]

'Father was well read in politics and in the nineteenth century novelists, Dickens and Trollope being his favourites. But his reading nourished the sour scepticism that possesed him [and he suggested to Glasser that reading was a waste of time]'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Mr Glasser      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [acceptance letter from Oxford University]

'I found the letter when I got home about seven in the evening. While I read it I bolted my teas as usual. Then I read it again, a message from a distant planet, with its strange, sonorous, processional language. "Willing to come into residence": you didn't go and stay, you went into [italics] residence [end italics]!'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Ralph Glasser      Manuscript: Letter

  

[unknown] : [Ralph Glasser's acceptance letter from Oxford University]

'With her shiny black apron she cleaned her Woolworth's spectacles, thick lenses in metal frames with wire side pieces, and read the letter, screwing up her eyes'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Rachel      Manuscript: Letter

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'For most of my first term I rose at [5 a.m.] and bathed and shaved and dressed, and read till breakfast time - until neighbours compained about the noise I made in the echoing ablutions, when I ran a bath or flushed the toilet and sometimes, forgetfully, strolled about whistling'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Ralph Glasser      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [a girl's diary]

'One day, alone for a moment in a girl's room in Lady Margaret Hall - she had gone to fetch a tea-pot from along the corridor - I saw that she had left her diary open, it seemed deliberately, and I saw my name and the words "he is a glorious young animal!"'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Ralph Glasser      Manuscript: Codex

  

[unknown] : [Romantic texts and works about Romanticism]

'I was intensely interested in the Romantics at this time, that explosion of creative thought so inadequately explained in reading and in lectures. We talked of French and German poetry'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Ralph Glasser      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [German poetry]

'I read German poetry with the aged, charming Fraulein Wuschack, sometime governess in the Kaiser's family'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Ralph Glasser      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [citation for bravery]

'The next I learned of him [his old friend Alec] was some time after D-Day, when I read the posthumous citation'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Ralph Glasser      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'There [living in a better area than previously, after his reformation from being a gambling addict], in his practical fashion, he [Glasser's father] looked after himself well, read a great deal, played solo whist in the Workers' Circle, spent hours chewing over the world with friends.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Mr Glasser      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [poems]

'A colleague at the Council, later to achieve distinction as a poet, sent me a copy of his first slim volume of verse with a note: "This is to get you into trouble with the secret police!" A characteristic irony, for the poems were far from subversive; the reference, I think, was rather to what he [italics] could [end italics] have written but had suppressed'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Ralph Glasser      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [novels]

'Like most of those capable of appreciating real literature, Lady Louisa enjoyed novels of almost any description; admitting her taste with unusual frankness: "I did not read novels when very young, and possibly I like them all the better afterwards; they are like wine to a person not used to them, but I fear I have been a downright dram-drinker, so long have they lost their effect".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Louisa, Lady Stuart      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [history books]

'Some of his pictures are good, and as his family is very noble and greatly allied, one sees many faces one has read of both in English and Scotch history, which I always think amusing'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Louisa, Lady Stuart      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Quarterly Review [article about Alexander von Humboldt]

'Pray tell Lady Louisa that I have been reading the last "Quarterly Review" (No. XLII) more steadily than I could do at Sheffield Place, and quite agree with her in liking the article upon our statute laws, which is very clear and convincing, and pleases me better than anything else in it, though I think it is on the whole an amusing number. Mr Humboldt and his ([italics] crodo, crodo [end italics] ) crocodiles entertained me; the account of Hayti was interesting; the first dissertation (on Aristophanes) and the last. Yet I am no convert to Messrs Whistlecraft & Co., I cannot like slipshod verse or be convinced that it is not as easily written as read; the burlesque of one country can hardly ever be well copied in the language of another. As for Plato and Xenophon, it revolts all my old prejudices to hear them discussed as if they were members of the Alfred, or the French Academy - to be told that Plato had delicacy of [italics] tact [end italics] taught him at the [italics] court [end italics] of Dionysius. It puts me in mind of Gray's simile about some book upon antiquity which he says was like an antique statue dressed in a negligee made by a Yorkshire mantua-maker'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Louisa, Lady Stuart      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [description of the Court of Haiti]

'I am very glad you have enjoyed the court of Hayti, much the best part of the book in my opinion. I only barred your reading it out of propriety and for fear the other Lady Louisa should be scandalized; pray tell her so. My own notions are that comical books rarely do harm, unless when they try to throw ridicule on sacred subjects; and, I am tempted to say, "Have fixed principles deeply rooted, and then read what you please". I agree with her that Tardif de Courtrac, tho' always clever, is sometimes very tedious, especially in America, from one's indifference respecting the subject. For "Ivanhoe", make yourself easy, I am its sincere partisan and Rebecca's devoted admirer. I would rather the templar had burst a blood vessel, because that is really often the effect of a conflict of violent passions and tho' they may bring on an apoplexy also , it is not apt to ensue so immediately'. [LS then discusses several characters in Ivanhoe at length]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Louisa, Lady Stuart      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown - French? -text featuring travels in America]

'I am very glad you have enjoyed the court of Hayti, much the best part of the book in my opinion. I only barred your reading it out of propriety and for fear the other Lady Louisa should be scandalized; pray tell her so. My own notions are that comical books rarely do harm, unless when they try to throw ridicule on sacred subjects; and, I am tempted to say, "Have fixed principles deeply rooted, and then read what you please". I agree with her that Tardif de Courtrac, tho' always clever, is sometimes very tedious, especially in America, from one's indifference respecting the subject. For "Ivanhoe", make yourself easy, I am its sincere partisan and Rebecca's devoted admirer. I would rather the templar had burst a blood vessel, because that it really often the effect of a conflict of violent passions and tho' they may bring on an apoplexy also , it is not apt to ensue so immediately'. [LS then discusses several characters in Ivanhoe at length]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Louisa, Lady Holroyd      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown - French? -text featuring travels in america]

'I am very glad you have enjoyed the court of Hayti, much the best part of the book in my opinion. I only barred your reading it out of propriety and for fear the other Lady Louisa should be scandalized; pray tell her so. My own notions are that comical books rarely do harm, unless when they try to throw ridicule on sacred subjects; and, I am tempted to say, "Have fixed principles deeply rooted, and then read what you please". I agree with her that Tardif de Courtrac, tho' always clever, is sometimes very tedious, especially in America, from one's indifference respecting the subject. For "Ivanhoe", make yourself easy, I am its sincere partisan and Rebecca's devoted admirer. I would rather the templar had burst a blood vessel, because that it really often the effect of a conflict of violent passions and tho' they may bring on an apoplexy also , it is not apt to ensue so immediately'. [LS then discusses several characters in Ivanhoe at length]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Louisa, Lady Stuart      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : Memoires de l'Europe sous Napoleon

'As for reading, I have much to say of the "Memoires de l'Europe sous Napoleon", but not time for it till quiet in my own house. I piously believe them genuine; they have the [italics] sceau [end italics] of his genius and of his profound art. I am also reading "Journal de Las Cases". I shut one book where he himself details the precautions taken to secure personal liberty under his government, the strict laws for the purpose, no person could be kept in prison a day without so, and so, and so, judges, privy council, and I know not what. I opened the other where Las Cases says that on looking over papers at St Helena, the Emperor was himself surprised to see the number of books prohibited and of [italics] persons arrested by the police [end italics], whom he had never heard of and knew nothing about'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Louisa, Lady Stuart      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [legal briefs]

[From SHR's introduction] 'The assistance to her husband in his professional duties consisted, so we are told in another obituary notice, in reading his briefs aloud to him when he returned home tired from the House of Commons, and marking from his dictation those passages he deemed of importance'.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Romilly      

  

[unknown] : [letter to Madame de Stael]

'I have seen a letter from a Gentleman in Sweden which proves that her [Madame de Stael's] Anglomania did not first arise on coming to this country. I will try if I can get you a copy of it. Mademoiselle [Albertine] is very much praised in it, but I do not think that we admire her as much as they did in Sweden.' [The letter is included]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Romilly      Manuscript: Letter

  

[unknown] : [novel by a lady novelist]

'The pleasure we had in reading "Patronage" has been even increased by reading the [torn and illegible] but I should not say we, for Sir Samuel could not get past the first volume. Surely it is vastly inferior to all her other publications and the only moral I can find out is that ladies should not go without pockets. It had to me all the defects of her other novels without any of their beauties, and the impression on my mind all the time I was reading it was similar to that of a tormenting dream, wherever you getg to the same disagreeable objects present themselves'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Romilly      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [novel by a lady novelist]

'The pleasure we had in reading "Patronage" has been even increased by reading the [torn and illegible] but I should not say we, for Sir Samuel could not get past the first volume. Surely it is vastly inferior to all her other publications and the only moral I can find out is that ladies should not go without pockets. It had to me all the defects of her other novels without any of their beauties, and the impression on my mind all the time I was reading it was similar to that of a tormenting dream, wherever you getg to the same disagreeable objects present themselves'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Romilly      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Edinburgh Review [review of 'Waverley']

'The "Edinburgh Review" will have praised "Waverley" to your hearts content. I think however they left out one of the most affecting parts of the work, which is the return of W. to the Barons, and the conduct of the poor innocent David Gellatley. Surely there is no doubt but that Walter Scott is the principal Author of it. The learned here do not affect to speak of it as belonging to anyone else -- I read "The Lord of the Isles" last night it being lent me for the Evening. There is some beautiful description indeed in it, particlarly to my fancy a barren scene in one of the Isles. I own I expected more from the two opening cantos than I afterwards found, and on the whole was disappointed. The story of the Page is so hackneyd, and there is nothing to redeem it but a greater power of holding the tongue than is commonly given to Women, and, as in every thing Walter Scott writes one can never feel great interest for the Lover, which one certainly ought to do, Malcolm Graeme in the "Lady of the Lake", "Waverley", and the Lover in "Marmion", and now Ronald, altho' I expected a great deal from him from the opening. I am however in love with the description of Robert Bruce, I think it beautiful. It is very presumptuous in me thus to give my opinion, [particularly as I have this morning heard that Sir James Mackintosh says it is by far the best thing Walter Scott has done, but then he is puffer general particularly to Scotsmen.] ' [Words inside brackets crossed out in original]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Romilly      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : Eugene

'Since I wrote the first two pages of this letter I have read Eugene and Guilliaume, and quite agree with you. Pray correct Sir James Mackintosh's opinion [about "Waverley"], and for [italics] best [end italics] read [italics] worst [end italics] which was his opinion, altho' I was told the contrary. He is now I understand a little softened, and says it comes before Rokeby but after all the others. Have you read "Discipline" by Mrs Brunton? With many defects it is much above the common class, and the last Volume is very pretty indeed some scenes nearly as good as "Waverley" who I might have added to my list of Lovers belonging to Walter Scott one can take no interest in. - Have you read La Baume's act. of the Campaign in Russia? I am told it is very well done. I am sure you will be pleased with Mr Rocca's Book if you read it'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Romilly      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Reports on Mendicity]

'His [Byron's] "Farewell" is miserable poetry, and the allusions to the intimacy of marriage are not only ungentlemanly, but unmanly. "The Domestick Sketch" is powerfully written. I have seen in the reports on mendicity that there are persons who teach the arts of abuse - His Lordship seems to have studied in this school, with great success'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Lovell Edgeworth      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unidentified novel]

'I have read both Emma and [torn and illegible]. In the first there is so little to remember, and in the last so much that one wishes to forget, that I am not inclined to write about them'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Romilly      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [reading primer]

'But all this while, altho' now about Thirteen Years Old, I could not read; then thinking of the vast usefulness of reading, I bought me a Primer, and got now one, then another, to teach me to Spell, and so learn'd to Read imperfectly, my Teachers themselves not being ready Readers: But in a little time, having learn'd to Read competently well, I was desirous to learn to Write, but was at a great loss for a Master, none of my fellow Shepherds being able to teach me'.

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Tryon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'[during his three years as a London apprentice castor-maker] I was mightily addicted to reading and Study; and tho' I was then engaged in a laborious trade and not allowed time for such Imployments of the Brain; yet I was so intent on my Study, that abridged myself of my Sleep and Rest. For after having wrought hard all day, from Five or Six in the Morning, till Ten or Eleven at Night, it was frequent with me to sit up two or three Hours reading'.

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Tryon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [books on astrology]

'[at Christmas, Easter and on other holidays, he] 'would be at Work or Study, whilst my Fellow-servants were abroad taking their Pleasure. I was then upon Astrolgy [sic], a Science too rashly decried by some' [he then discusses the merits of Astrology at length, but not mentioning any specific texts]

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Tryon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [books]

'But besides Astrology, I read Books of Physick, and sereval [sic] other natural Sciences and Arts.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Tryon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'the time others spent in the Coffee-house or Tavern, I spent in Reading, Writing, Musick, or some useful Imployment'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Tryon      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'When she [Katherine Hamilton, sister of Elizabeth] is not employed about something necessary and useful, she entertains herself with a book for the improvement of her mind'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Katherine Hamilton      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'[editor's words] Previous to her arrival in Stirlingshire she had learnt to read with distinctness and propriety; and, under the tuition of Mrs Marshall, became an adept in this rare accomplishment. In books she soon discovered a substitute even for a playmate: her first hero was Wallace, with whom she became enamoured, by learning to recite Blind Harry's Lays. Two or three of Shakespeare's historical plays came in her way; the history of England followed. She happened to meet with Ogilvie's translation of Homer's Iliad, and soon learnt to idolize Achilles, and almost to dream of Hector'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Hamilton      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [A history of England]

'[editor's words] Previous to her arrival in Stirlingshire she had learnt to read with distinctness and propriety; and, under the tuition of Mrs Marshall, became an adept in this rare accomplishment. In books she soon discovered a substitute even for a playmate: her first hero was Wallace, with whom she became enamoured, by learning to recite Blind Harry's Lays. Two or three of Shakespeare's historical plays came in her way; the history of England followed. She happened to meet with Ogilvie's translation of Homer's Iliad, and soon learnt to idolize Achilles, and almost to dream of Hector'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Hamilton      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [scholastic divinity essays]

'[editor's words] In the evening Elizabeth had often to repeat a long elaborate task extracted from the now obsolete page of scholastic divinity, which must have been better calculated to exercise the memory than to call forth the devotional affections'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Hamilton      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [books chosen by Mrs Marshall]

'[editor's words] without literary pretensions, Mrs Marshall had a genuine love of reading, and when no other engagement intervened, it was one of her domestic regulations, that a book should be read aloud in the evening for general amusement; the office of reader commonly devolved on Miss Hamilton, who was thus led to remark that the best prose style was always that which could be longest read without exhausting the breath. These social studies were far from satisfying her avidity for information; and she constantly perused many books by stealth. Mrs Marshall, on discovering what had been her private occupation, expressed neither praise nor blame, but quietly advised her to avoid any display of superior knowledge by which she might be subjected to the imputation of pedantry. This admonition produced the desired effect, since, as she herself informs us, she once hid a volume of Lord Kames's Elements of Criticism under the cushion of a chair lest she should be detected in a study which prejudice and ignorance might pronounce unfeminine'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Hamilton      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'[editor's words] without literary pretensions, Mrs Marshall had a genuine love of reading, and when no other engagement intervened, it was one of her domestic regulations, that a book should be read aloud in the evening for general amusement; the office of reader commonly devolved on Miss Hamilton, who was thus led to remark that the best prose style was always that which could be longest read without exhausting the breath. These social studies were far from satisfying her avidity for information; and she constantly perused many books by stealth. Mrs Marshall, on discovering what had been her private occupation, expressed neither praise nor blame, but quietly advised her to avoid any display of superior knowledge by which she might be subjected to the imputation of pedantry. This admonition produced the desired effect, since, as she herself informs us, she once hid a volume of Lord Kames's Elements of Criticism under the cushion of a chair lest she should be detected in a study which prejudice and ignorance might pronounce unfeminine'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Hamilton      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'[editor's words] without literary pretensions, Mrs Marshall had a genuine love of reading, and when no other engagement intervened, it was one of her domestic regulations, that a book should be read aloud in the evening for general amusement; the office of reader commonly devolved on Miss Hamilton, who was thus led to remark that the best prose style was always that which could be longest read without exhausting the breath. These social studies were far from satisfying her avidity for information; and she constantly perused many books by stealth. Mrs Marshall, on discovering what had been her private occupation, expressed neither praise nor blame, but quietly advised her to avoid any display of superior knowledge by which she might be subjected to the imputation of pedantry. This admonition produced the desired effect, since, as she herself informs us, she once hid a volume of Lord Kames's Elements of Criticism under the cushion of a chair lest she should be detected in a study which prejudice and ignorance might pronounce unfeminine'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mrs Marshall      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Scottish history]

'[editor's words] In reading the annals of her own country, she had been touched with the hard fate of Lady Arabella Stuart; and, either to extend her knowledge, or amuse her fancy, collected much miscellaneous information respecting her, which she afterwards cast into the form of a historical novel'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Hamilton      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'History and travels are our chief favourites; but with them we intermix a variety of miscellaneous literature, with now and then a favourite novel, to relish our graver studies'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Hamilton and her uncle, Mr Marshall     Print: Book

  

[unknown] : ['The Italian' - unknown text]

'I have read the Italian - nothing in it is well'

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Johnson      

  

[unknown] : [sources for his Dictionary]

'The authorities [for the definitions in Johnson's Dictionary] were copied from the books themselves, in which he had marked the passages with a black lead pencil, the traces of which could easily be effaced'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Johnson      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [books of Northern literature]

'Here was an excellent library; particularly, a valuable collection of books in Northern literature, with which Johnson was often very busy. One day Mr Wise read to us a dissertation which he was preparing for the press, intitled "A History and Chronology of the fabulous Ages".'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Johnson      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [book on astronomy]

'"A little book we had in the house" led him, "Almost as early as I can remember", to develop an interest in astronomy; and Lempriere's "Classical Dctionary" "Fell into my hands when I was eight" (as he said in his old age) and "attached my affections to paganism".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Alfred Edward Housman      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [a French magazine]

'[A Mr Murphy was looking for something to print in "The Gray's Inn Journal" and a Mr Foote suggested] "Here is a French magazine, in which you will find a very pretty oriental tale; translate that, and send it to your printer". Mr Murphy, having read the tale, was highly pleased with it, and followed Foote's advice. When he returned to town, this tale was pointed out to him in "The Rambler", from whence it had been translated into the French magazine.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mr Foote      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [a French magazine]

'[A Mr Murphy was looking for something to print in "The Gray's Inn Journal" and a Mr Foote suggested] "Here is a French magazine, in which you will find a very pretty oriental tale; translate that, and send it to your printer". Mr Murphy, having read the tale, was highly pleased with it, and followed Foote's advice. When he returned to town, this tale was pointed out to him in "The Rambler", from whence it had been translated into the French magazine.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mr Murphy      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'[Johnson said] "Sir, in my early years I read very hard. It is a sad reflection, but a true one, that I knew almost as much at eighteen as I do now. My judgment, to be sure, was not so good; but I had all the facts."'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Johnson      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'His Majesty having observed to him that he supposed he must have read a great deal; Johnson answered, that he thought more than he read; that he had read a great deal in the early part of his life, but having fallen into ill health, he had not been able to read much, compared with others: for instance, he said, he had not read much, compared with Dr. Warburton.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Johnson      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Lowth-Warburton controversy]

'His Majesty then talked of the controversy between Warburton and Lowth, which he seemed to have read, and asked Johnson what he thought of it. Johnson answered, "Warburton has most general, most scholastic learning ; Lowth is the more correct scholar. I do not know which of them calls names best." The King was pleased to say he was of the same opinion; adding, "You do not think then, Dr. Johnson, that there was much argument in the case." Johnson said, he did not think there was. "Why truly, (said the King,) when once it comes to calling names, argument is pretty well at an end." His Majesty then asked him what he thought of Lord Lyttelton's history, which was then just published. Johnson said, he thought his style pretty good, but he had blamed Henry the Second rather too much.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Johnson      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [Lowth-Warburton controversy]

'His Majesty then talked of the controversy between Warburton and Lowth, which he seemed to have read, and asked Johnson what he thought of it. Johnson answered, "Warburton has most general, most scholastic learning ; Lowth is the more correct scholar. I do not know which of them calls names best." The King was pleased to say he was of the same opinion; adding, "You do not think then, Dr. Johnson, that there was much argument in the case." Johnson said, he did not think there was. "Why truly, (said the King,) when once it comes to calling names, argument is pretty well at an end." His Majesty then asked him what he thought of Lord Lyttelton's history, which was then just published. Johnson said, he thought his style pretty good, but he had blamed Henry the Second rather too much.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: George III of England      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'between reading, chatting and backgammon, we conclude the evening, and usually retire, making the remark, that if we are not regaled by any high-seasoned amusements, we are disturbed by no uneasy cares'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Hamilton and her uncle, Mr Marshall     Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [oriental literature]

'[EDITOR's WORDS] His [her brother, Charles's ] conversation inspired her with a taste for oriental literature; and without affecting to become a Persian scholar, she spontaneously caught the idioms, as she insensibly became familiar with the customs and manners of the East'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Hamilton      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'[EDITOR'S WORDS] 'If no engagement intervened, the interval from seven till ten was occupied with some interesting book, which, according to her good aunt Marshall's rule, was read aloud for the benefit of the whole party'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Hamilton      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Many years ago, when I used to read in the library of your College, I promised to recompence the college for that permission, by adding to their books a Baskerville's 'Virgil'. I have now sent it, and desire you to reposit it on the shelves in my name'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Johnson      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : ['black letter', ie gothic text books - medieval to 16th c.]

'[from an account by Dr Maxwell, an Irish london-based priest friend of Johnson] Speaking of Mr. Harte, Canon of Windsor, and writer of "The History of Gustavus Adolphus", he much commended him as a scholar, and a man of the must companionable talents he had ever known. He said, the defects in his history proceeded not from imbecility, but from foppery. He loved, he said, the old black letter books; they were rich in matter, though their style was inelegant; wonderfully so, considering how conversant the writers were with the best models of antiquity. Burton's "Anatomy of Melancholy", he said, was the only book that ever took him out of bed two hours sooner than he wished to rise.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Johnson      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [French novels]

'Speaking of the French novels, compared with Richardson's, he said, they might be pretty baubles, but a wren was not an eagle'. [account by Dr Maxwell, an Irish London priest friend of Dr Johnson]

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Johnson      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [legal case papers]

'I then reminded him of the schoolmaster's cause [a legal case on corporal punisment that Boswell was defending], and proposed to read to him the printed papers concerning it. "No, sir (said he), I can read quicker than I can hear." So he read them to himself.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Johnson      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [legal case papers]

'The Swede [Mr Kristrom] went away, and Mr. Johnson continued his reading of the papers. I said, "I am afraid, Sir, it is troublesome to you." "Why, Sir (said he), I do not take much delight in it; but I'll go through it".'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Johnson      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [legal trial papers]

'I mentioned Elwal the heretick, whose trial Sir John Pringle had given me to read.'

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Boswell      

  

[unknown] : [books belonging to Johnson]

'[on Good Friday] We went to church both in the morning and evening. In the interval between the two services we did not dine; but he read in the Greek New Testament, and I turned over several of his books.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Boswell      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [a recently published book]

'Mr. Elphinston talked of a new book that was much admired, and asked Dr. Johnson if he had read it. Johnson. "I have looked into it." "What (said Elphinston), have you not read it through?" Johnson, offended at being thus pressed, and so obliged to own his cursory mode of reading, answered tartly, "No, sir; do [italics] you [end italics] read books [italics] through [end italics]?"'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Elphinstone      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [a recently published book]

'Mr. Elphinston talked of a new book that was much admired, and asked Dr. Johnson if he had read it. Johnson. "I have looked into it." "What (said Elphinston), have you not read it through?" Johnson, offended at being thus pressed, and so obliged to own his cursory mode of reading, answered tartly, "No, sir; do [italics] you [end italics] read books [italics] through [end italics]?"'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Johnson      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'[During the 1880s Gissing] continued to read Latin and Greek authors daily'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gissing      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [verses deposited in Lady Miller's vase]

'Lady Miller's collection of verses by fashionable people, which were put into her Vase at Batheaston Villa, near Bath, in competition for honorary prizes, being mentioned, he held them very cheap: "[italics] Bouts rimes [end italics] (said he), is a mere conceit, and an [italics] old [end italics] conceit [italics] now [end italics]; I wonder how people were persuaded to write in that manner for this lady."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Johnson      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After they all went I came and wrote my journal and sat with cousin Priscilla and we read till dinner'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Gurney      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After they all went I came and wrote my journal and sat with cousin Priscilla and we read till dinner'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Priscilla Hannah Gurney      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown, possibly Bible]

'Yesterday evening I had a little choice time by myself. I read and was still in my heart.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Gurney      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown, probably religious, Bible?]

'A most comfortable reading with my little boys and one with my family'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Gurney      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown, probably religious, Bible?]

'A most comfortable reading with my little boys and one with my family'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Gurney      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I devoted most of my morning writing to P. Hoare, writing French and reading'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Gurney      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'at night snug time reading after the rest of the family were in bed'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Gurney      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown, probably religious, Bible?]

'went to Meeting - had a more comfortable reading with my boys than this day [last] week'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Gurney      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown, probably religious, Bible?]

'I had a satisfactory reading with my little boys more so than I almost remember'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Gurney      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'At ten o'clock we all met in the study and my father read to us. - I fear my mind is not sufficiently obedient to its God. After dinner I taught Danny to read and did a little logic. Since that I have been reading aloud a long homily and there I committed a fault. John asked me to let him read and I did not, which takes off the satisfaction of reading for I did not do as I would be done by.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Gurney      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown, probably religious, Bible?]

'At ten o'clock we all met in the study and my father read to us. - I fear my mind is not sufficiently obedient to its God. After dinner I taught Danny to read and did a little logic. Since that I have been reading aloud a long homily and there I committed a fault. John asked me to let him read and I did not, which takes off the satisfaction of reading for I did not do as I would be done by.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Gurney      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown, probably Bible?]

'Rose in pretty good time, read before breakfast, had a lesson in French, read English, wrote logic before dinner'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Gurney      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Rose in pretty good time, read before breakfast, had a lesson in French, read English, wrote logic before dinner'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Gurney      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown, probably Bible?]

'I wrote and read a little before breakfast'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Gurney      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown, probably religious, Bible?]

'quite vexed to teach my children in so shabby a room as the laundry; [underline] Pride [end underline] I think it was; however, I had a very comfortable reading with them'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Gurney      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown, probably religious, Bible?]

'I had a comfortable time with my children only I felt too anxious for uncle Joseph to see them as he was here but he did not; I am fearful I should be vain of my reading, I feel I am so now; I hope if I try to overcome it, I shall not be so'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Gurney      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [French]

'I had a quiet afternoon on the sofa in my room reading Mason on self knowledge, French, and Job Scott's journal, which I like vastly and found really doing me good, at least edifying me'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Gurney      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I read to dear little Mary'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Gurney      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Accounts of the Missions

E. Fry writes to her husband and daughter, Rachel, of the death of her sister, Priscilla Gurney, dated 25 Mar 1821: 'In the morning she appeared very full of love - put out her hand to several of us - showed much pleasure in your uncle Buxton's being here, and tried to speak to him but could not be understood - expressed her wish for reading, and from her feeling of love and fondness for the chapter and some signs, we believed she meant the thirteenth of 1 Corinthians, and we had a very sweet animating time together, and afterwards our dear brother Fowell spoke very sweetly to her; and besides the Bible she appeared to have some satisfaction in hearing other books read, as it has been her habit during her illness, just like mine when ill ... though she confined it to religious books, yet many of these were of an interesting nature; her hymns [Selection of Hymns, by P. Gurney] interested her much - she liked Samuel Scott's Diary - Piety Promoted - Accounts of the Missions - Watts and How - and many other books of that description ... I think her object in reading was gentle amusement and at times edification - she was very particular not to read the Bible except she felt herself in rather a lively state'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Priscilla Gurney      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Bible probably]

'The following particulars relating to a poor woman named Amelia Roberts, who has hanged for robbing her master's house, are so instructive both to masters and servants... The facts stated were communicated by her to two of the ladies of the Newgate Association who visited her ... she then went into the family of Lady E.K., who, being a woman of exemplary piety herself, laboured for the good of her servants also ... the private instructions of her mistress, who would at times sit and read to her while working at her needle, were at length blessed so far that she became sensible of the value of her soul'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady E.K.      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'The following particulars relating to a poor woman named Amelia Roberts, who has hanged for robbing her master's house, are so instructive both to masters and servants... The facts stated were communicated by her to two of the ladies of the Newgate Association who visited her ... [in the gaol in Monmouth] Conscience was there aroused from its long slumber. She met with a little book which recalled to her memory the instructions she had received from Lady E.K., and the feelings thus excited were, through the overruling power and grace of God, confirmed and strengthened'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Amelia Roberts      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [hymn-book]

'The following particulars relating to a poor woman named Amelia Roberts, who has hanged for robbing her master's house, are so instructive both to masters and servants... The facts stated were communicated by her to two of the ladies of the Newgate Association who visited her ... [in the condemned cell in Newgate] She asked for Toplady's beautiful hymn, beginning, "Rock of Ages, cleft for me"; and on receiving a hymn-book which contained it read it with great interest, saying it exactly described her feelings'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Amelia Roberts      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Come to Jesus

'Eliza Cooper was first visited in Newgate in the summer of 1849. She was committed for unlawfully deserting her infant ... From this time the poor prisoner earnestly longed for salvation, and received with joy the glad tidings of a Savior's love. The little tract, entitled "Come to Jesus", was blessed to her, and she read it frequently with much delight'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Eliza Cooper      Print: Book, tract

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Remained at home in the evening amused myself with Reading.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Played Cricket in the afternoon. Attended a Lecture at the Mechanics Institute. Afterwards Read a little & then went to bed.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read at home in the evening till nearly eleven Then went down the Street.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Dined at Hall's. Came home & Read until I went to bed.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Went to bed at ten o clock. Got up in the night & Read could not sleep.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Went for a little walk with Polly in the evening. Read & then went to bed.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read in the morning.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

' Read at home during the evening.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read at home in the evening.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Seemed to dread going to bed, everything smelling hot & stuffy, laid down for a time on the sofa, then got up & read till I was tired then went to bed.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read & idled during the afternoon till Telford made his appearance'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After tea I went for a walk, a very quiet stroll indeed, did not meet a soul I knew & did not open my mouth to speak. Came home read, smoked & went to bed.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'The rest of the day I was mostly reading or playing with the children.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [fairy tales?]

'After tea I read to the youngsters & then went out for a walk, came back & read the Australasian'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'In the evening the ladies went to St Peters church I staid at home & did Harry's sums then amused myself by reading aloud some pieces from Bells Elocutionist...When the ladies returned I did a little reading & then took some grog & went to bed.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Went to the Mechanics & read the papers before tea, went again after tea & exchanged some books, came home & read till I was tired then smoked away & talked to Polly till it was time to go to bed'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'In the afternoon I read a story out of Grimm's Goblins to the little girls & after Muster as the weather was wet I stayed at home & read ... In the evening I went to the Mechanics & read the papers, nothing however very startling. Bowman's lecture on "Shams" appeared in the Ovens & Murray of Saturday last'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'In the afternoon I mustered & then sat reading till tea time. In the evening I went as usual to the Mechanics & read the papers'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After muster went to the Mechanics & had a look at the Evening Herald & at Melbourne Punch nothing startling in either of the papers excepting that some clothes were found on the Banks of the Yarra which on being examined were found to contain between three & four hundred pounds in notes, the clothes were afterwards found to belong to a Mr D. (illegible) a professor of languages who is thought to have committed suicide. In the evening felt very lazily inclined & bilious sat & read till nine o clock'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read a little, drank a little & smoked a good deal'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I went to "the Mechanics" & when I returned I amused myself with reciting & reading aloud'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'went to the Yorick Club & read for a time'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After muster I sat at home & read ... After tea I went into town & called at the "Mechanics" & afterwards at the "Yorick". Saw in the Evening Paper that a Bank Accountant at Geelong was supposed to have embezzled a considerable sum of money & to have gone to Fidgi, should this be true it will be another great scandal as Mr Farrell the person accused was a very old resident of Geelong & much respected by the inhabitants of that place'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read all the evening & did not attempt to go out at all'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'My foot was bad again to-day & I was obliged to be careful with it consequently I stayed at home & read nearly the whole of the time.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read & smoked till about half past ten o clock, then went to bed'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Came home to tea & as the weather was wet in the evening did not stir out but stayed at home & read till bed time'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I was left by myself & spent the time pretty comfortably reading some sketches by "Yates", then smoking & thinking for a change'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read & smoked till about half past ten then went to bed & went sulkily to sleep feeling very miserable & dissatisfied with myself & the world in general'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Went to the Mechanics in the evening & changed some books came home & read.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Mustered in the afternoon & then went to the Yorick where I did a little reading ... Came home soon & after a read & a smoke went to bed'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [Roman history]

'I read with horror of the brutual exhibitions of the Romans with their gladiators pitted against one another or opposed to wild beasts & wonder how the populace could delight in such cruel amusement. I do not however think the men of the modern age are much different & I feel confident if a scene of the kind was to take place in Melbourne to-morrow there would be any number of applications for admission'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Came home sat down to read & did so for some time, then I went in for smoking & for gin & water'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Went into Melbourne after tea & changed a book at the Mechanics, then came home, read a novel for some time smoked a pipe & then went to bed'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I did not go out at all this evening but after tea sat reading till I was tired when Harry & I read together & then I [spouted?] for his & my amusement. From a Telegram in the evening paper I saw that some lucky ones had got a nugget of 43 lbs weight at Berlin, a nice New Year's Gift for the lucky finders'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown - newspaper]

'I went to the Club in the evening & read the papers for some time, then took a stroll & returned home'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Newspaper

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Mustered this afternoon, then sat & read till tea time. After tea had more than an hour with the youngsters reading to them from Grimm's Goblins.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Went to the Yorick Club in the evening & stayed there chatting & reading until nearly ten o'clock'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Newspaper, Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Got home a little after nine o'clock & after a little reading and two or three pipes had a bath & went to bed'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : Handy Andy

'Was sorry to see in the Argus this morning that "Raecke's" private house was burnt down on Sunday evening last & that he was not insured, a child playing with matches is said to have been the cause of the accident. Did Harry's sums for him this evening & then read "Handy Andy" as the weather was so bad I could not very well go out.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I sat up smoking & reading with an occasional turn at nagging till nearly twelve o'clock'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [fairy tales?]

'Read The Australasian to myself & some little tales to the children & passed the evening away until past ten'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Stayed talking with Sissy, Walter & Harry. Read to them for a little while & then looked over Harry's sums'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [fairy tales?]

'While Polly was at Church I read many Tales to the little [children] until they were tired'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Stayed home all the evening. Amused myself reading until ten o'clock'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : Blueskin, or the adventures of Jonathan Wild

'Stayed at home nursing my cough this evening. Read "Jack Sheppard" or rather "Blueskin", smoked some strong tobacco & went to bed'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Stayed at home all the evening, first amused myself with Reading, smoking & dreaming'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Polly played the Piano all the evening & I read'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'In the evening I amused myself with reading while Polly amused or instructed herself at the piano.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

Mustered in the afternoon & spent the evening reading & disagreeing'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'In the evening went to "the Yorick" where I read the papers. Then came home & read till Polly came in'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'the youngsters spent a great deal of their time in the parlor & in the evening their mamma read them a number of stories out of some Sunday books. then Sissy, Dotty & Walter read a little. Surprised my by the improvement each had made [since I?] last heard them'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Polly Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'the youngsters spent a great deal of their time in the parlor & in the evening their mamma read them a number of stories out of some Sunday books. then Sissy, Dotty & Walter read a little. Surprised my by the improvement each had made [since I?] last heard them'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Walter Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'the youngsters spent a great deal of their time in the parlor & in the evening their mamma read them a number of stories out of some Sunday books. then Sissy, Dotty & Walter read a little. Surprised my by the improvement each had made [since I?] last heard them'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Sissy Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'the youngsters spent a great deal of their time in the parlor & in the evening their mamma read them a number of stories out of some Sunday books. then Sissy, Dotty & Walter read a little. Surprised my by the improvement each had made [since I?] last heard them'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Dotty Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'In the evening read for a while, then played Bezique with Mrs Castieau'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after Muster wrote a page in my Diary & read until nearly five o'clock'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Stayed at home this evening & did nothing else but read. Mrs Robertson stayed till about eight o'clock but I did not see much of her as she & Polly left me in the dining room while they gossiped away in the Drawing Room.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'when I went into the house after Muster I found that Polly had gone away to Elsternwick with Harry, Sissy & Dotty so I sat & read till tea time. After tea I read again till the women went into the Gaol '

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [Poems]

'Read some pieces of poetry to them this evening & was very pleased however to find how interested they were & how much they seemed to enjoy them.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Poems]

'In the evening I stayed at home, played "Snap" with Dotty & read some poetry & the Story of Le Fevre to please Harry'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Le Fevre

'In the evening I stayed at home, played "Snap" with Dotty & read some poetry & the Story of Le Fevre to please Harry'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Had dinner & read until Muster time. After Muster read again till tea-time.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [stories]

'In the evening wrote a page in my Diary & dreamed away over "The Newcomes" until it was time to go to bed. The little girls & Harry stayed with me a good deal during the day & I read some little stories to them & Walter'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Went to the Club in the evening & read for a while, then came home & after reading for a while went to bed'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Newspaper, Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Went to the Club in the evening & read for a while, then came home & after reading for a while went to bed'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [fairy tales]

'I stayed at home amusing the children by reading a fairy tale to them. They seemed to take great interest inn the narrative & after I had finished it Flory went [smiling?] home & Sissy & Dotty went away good temperedly to bed. Read "Poor dog [Tray?]" out of ["Ingolitsby"?] to Harry & then sent him off to bed also'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Stayed at home this evening & after doing a little reading & visiting the pigs played Bezique with Polly till it was time to go to bed.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Heard Dotty read to-night & was quite pleased at finding she was very much improved & able to read easy words without any trouble'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Dotty Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'This brought the time to past ten o'clock. Read, smoked, fidgetted & passed the time away till half past eleven, then went across to Dr Robertson's & rang the bell'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Got home about ten, sat reading till about twelve, & then went to bed.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Could not muster to-day but laid myself down on the Sofa & read'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I was much disturbed this morning & was up reading at two o'clock the mosquitoes not allowing me to get to sleep'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Came home, drank a bottle of beer, smoked ever so many pipes, read a book, & built castles in the air till Polly & the youngsters returned which they did at about eleven o'clock

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Went into town in the evening & called at the Yorick. There I remained reading for some time then I took a walk as far as Spencer Street Railway Station'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Newspaper, Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : The Graphic

'Went to the Club again in the evening & had a look over the [Home?] papers. The Illustrated & Graphic are full of Engravings relating to "Thanksgiving Day" ... to the Tichbourne Case'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Newspaper

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I read at Home to the little girls & boys till eight o'clock, then went to the Club'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I read for a time to the little boys. They were very attentive & it was quite a pleasure to watch their earnest faces'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I went to the Club where I looked through some of the ... Papers & then came away home. Stayed at home in the evening reading & trying to amuse the children.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [story books]

'After tea I read some story books that Mrs Parkin had kindly sent over for the amusement of baby'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After tea I read with Harry some Dramatic [?]. Harry understands well what he reads, but is in too great a hurry & consequently leaves out little words which spoil the effect of his delivery'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Harry Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'"Telo" one of the Age staff was hunting up material for an Article & spent the whole day in the prison. He had some lunch with us & also came in at tea time. We had some recitations or rather reading in the evening, Harry rather distinguishing himself.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Harry Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Heard Harry read & was much pleased with the understanding he shows though he is at times very careless with regard to little words'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Harry Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [drama?]

'Harry & I then read a dialogue & this brought the time right for the theatre, where Telo took Mrs Castieau, the girls & Harry'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Harry Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After tea Harry began to read & was pretty successful with his lesson for which he was duly rewarded a mark.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Harry Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'While Darvall was with us this evening, Harry was anxious to show off his reading & so essayed a Piece. He was however so affected by mumps & Stammering, that his heart failed him & he declined to proceed. To please his mamma I read a dialogue with him. This he managed very well & so we read another then Harry was wound up & would have gone on forever, had I not let him gently down. I continued the entertainment by reading "The Execution of Montrose" & was by particular desire reading Byron's "Battle of Waterloo" when my sweet voice was closed by the arrival of Mr Hadley.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Harry Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [dialogue]

'While Darvall was with us this evening, Harry was anxious to show off his reading & so essayed a Piece. He was however so affected by mumps & Stammering, that his heart failed him & he declined to proceed. To please his mamma I read a dialogue with him. This he managed very well & so we read another then Harry was wound up & would have gone on forever, had I not let him gently down. I continued the entertainment by reading "The Execution of Montrose" & was by particular desire reading Byron's "Battle of Waterloo" when my sweet voice was closed by the arrival of Mr Hadley.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley and Harry Castieau     Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I read a little Byron for my own amusement then a number of Aesop's Fables for the amusement of the youngsters. The evening seemed quite short in consequence of the employment & I was still busy reading when Polly & Sissy got back'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'heard Harry & Sissy read'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Harry Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'heard Harry & Sissy read'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Sissy Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Heard Harry read, but was very bilious & unwell'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Harry Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read a part of a very good novel, "Married beneath him". Heard Harry read & then played a Game of Bezique with Polly'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Harry Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [dialogue?]

'In the evening Harry & I read for a long time together while mamma amused herself with the piano.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley and Harry Castieau     Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After a quiet read for an hour or so I felt much more amiable & undertook to take baby out for a walk.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [Reports from America on Prisoners Aid Societies]

'Home then read some Reports from America on Prisoners Aid Societies & the good that had there been effected by them.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Was at home all the evening. Heard Sissy & Harry read, read a little myself & went off to bed tolerably early'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Was at home all the evening. Heard Sissy & Harry read, read a little myself & went off to bed tolerably early'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Harry Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Was at home all the evening. Heard Sissy & Harry read, read a little myself & went off to bed tolerably early'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Sissy Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read to the youngsters in the evening'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'In the evening I heard Harry read. He could not however get on very well & so I turned him over to his mother & played first "Beggar my neighbour" with Dotty'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Harry Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I must not forget however I read out of "Good Words" a very amusing sketch of a Dutchman's troubles in London from the difficulties of the English language. He gave the name of the Street he was living in as Stick no Bill Street. F.P. 13ft. Harry read to-night but I was obliged to tell him he had not improved at all lately.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Harry Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Harry importuned me to play Bezique, so we had a game & after it was over I took my book & Harry went to bed'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'In the evening I read to the youngsters until it was time for them to go to bed.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [drama]

'After tea this evening I read some dramatic pieces with Harry & played a couple of games of Bezique with Mamma. Smoked several pipes & then went to bed'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley and Harry Castieau     Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [stories]

'I read a story in the evening to the youngsters & then heard Harry read for marks. We were engaged in a dialogue from the Merchant of Venice when Mr Henry Smith of the Argus called to see me'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [stories]

'The Australasian & the Age. Then read a little to the youngsters & at ten o'clock went to bed'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'This Evening was rather a lazy one. I read & afterwards played a game of Bezique with Polly, then went to bed'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [prison report]

'Mustered in the afternoon & then worked in the office for a couple of hours, employing myself first with my Diary & afterwards in reading a Prison Report from which I intend to make some extracts for future use. After ten I went down to the Club & sat reading for some little time then had a chat with Levey & left for home ... Polly had been amusing the children by reading to them'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [drama?]

'Read with Harry in the Evening, then played a long game of Bezique with Sissy'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley and Harry Castieau     Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [stories]

'Polly played sacred music & I read for a time to the youngsters.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Was much pleased with Sissy's Reading to-night. Dotty has a very good idea of Reading also but is not able to speak plainly & so makes a great hash of some of the hard words.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Sissy Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Was much pleased with Sissy's Reading to-night. Dotty has a very good idea of Reading also but is not able to speak plainly & so makes a great hash of some of the hard words.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Dotty Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I stayed at home in the evening & amused myself by reading.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Was reading a good deal in the evening, then came into the Gaol & wrote up my Diary'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'When we came home we did some reading & then Polly & I played three games of bagatelle of which I lost two'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I stayed at home & read'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : Dr Syntax

'In the evening I read some little tit bits from Dr [Syntax?] to the youngsters'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After tea sat & smoked while Polly read for a while, soon followed her to bed'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Polly Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'in the evening I did a little reading & went to bed early'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Had some reading with Harry & Dotty, Dotty went to sleep but Harry joined me in a Piece & listened to my reading another.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Castieau family     Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Stayed at home drinking & smoking & doing a little reading till Polly returned with Godfrey from the theatre at twelve o'clock'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'In the evening I read until the children & Miss McDermott went to bed, then I smoked away until ten o'clock went to bed shortly after'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'In the evening read away for some time & had some words with Polly on a very disagreeable subject'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read during the evening & went to bed at about eleven'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : Blackwood's Magazine

'I amused myself with reading a tale in Blackwood till nine o'clock'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [drama?]

'In the evening Harry & I did some Readings. It was a great night for Harry & he did'ent go to bed till after ten o'clock.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley and Harry Castieau     Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'read in the evening & went to bed early'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'spent the evening at home reading'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'In the evening I read a good deal to myself & then read with Dotty & afterwards with Harry'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Castieau family     Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'In the evening I read a good deal to myself & then read with Dotty & afterwards with Harry'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'This night I went to bed at ten o'clock. Polly stayed down stairs reading'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Polly Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I had some books to read & when I could get anything at all like an easy position in bed I stayed satisfied.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'This evening after I had had my dinner I went to the Athenaeum & stayed reading for an hour'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Newspaper, Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read at the Athenaeum.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Newspaper, Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'In the evening Harry & the girls went to Church, Polly & I sat reading by the fire till it was toddy time, then we had our tot & went off to bed'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'In the evening went to the Athenaeum & looked at the papers, came home & read for a while then smoked a pipe & went off to bed.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read for a long time. My eyes have been very weak of late & I found to-night that reading small print by gas-light did not make them better. I am beginning to get disgusted with badly printed newspapers or periodicals & dont look at them unless obliged to do so.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Newspaper, Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Spent the evening over the fire reading most of the time although I did play a game of Bezique with Sissy & three games of cribbage with Polly'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Did not muster but went to the Athenaeum to read the papers. Stayed at home in the evening & read for a while, then smoked for a time'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Went to the Athenaeum & had a look at the papers, in the evening after tea read for a while & then played a game of Bezique with Dotty. Harry read a piece of prose as an exercise, he is to be examined in Reading to-day, the boy certainly reads very well.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Went to the Athenaeum & had a look at the papers, in the evening after tea read for a while & then played a game of Bezique with Dotty. Harry read a piece of prose as an exercise, he is to be examined in Reading to-day, the boy certainly reads very well.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Harry Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Looked in at the Athenaeum & read the papers then came home to tea, in the evening read to Harry & heard him read, he got sulky after a time & went off to bed'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley and Harry Castieau     Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I stayed at home & read. In the afternoon I mustered & then sat for the rest of the day reading over the fire.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'At tea time however I came down stairs & after reading a while went into the office & attended to some duty'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Went to the Athenaeum & had a look at the papers. In the evening read for a while & played a couple of games of cribbage with Dotty'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read "George [Gaith?]" until Polly & Harry came home went to bed at about half past twelve o'clock'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Went to the Athenaeum & read before tea time. In the evening smoked & read until it was time to go to bed'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I went to the Athenaeum after five o'clock & got home by tea time spent the evening reading.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown - novel]

'Read newspapers & a novel nearly all day the weather being so unsettled that it was not deemed wise to go out.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Stayed up late reading & smoking'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : Sarah Barnham

'Came back by the half past one train [from?] Town, after buying "Sarah Barnham" at [the?] Station. Amused myself by reading her very strange history as related by her biographer or assumed biographer who has certainly taken considerable license as she details the death of her subject though it is well known that "Sarah Barnham" is meant for Sara Bernhardt the great actress & that Sara is still among the illustrious living. The Book is a horribly spiteful one & well illustrates the spite one woman can show against another.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Sarah Barnham

'Bought ["Life of Sarah Barnham"?] (Sara Bernhardt). (See entry for 24 August.) It is villanously scandalous & makes the great actress out to be little better than a beast. It is however humorously written & I sat up reading it till nearly midnight.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I wrote up my Diary & read in the evening'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Awoke early & as it was too soon to get up read for an hour in bed. Did not go to town to-day, read & wrote in the morning'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : Five Years in Penal Servitude

'In the evening commenced reading again a book called Five years in Penal Servitude. The book refers to English prisons & professes to have been written by one who has served a sentence. It evidently is the work of an author well up in what he has made his subject.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read & wrote till bed time'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Had something to eat & then read & smoked till after twelve o'clock.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Went to bed after reading for a long while'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buckley Castieau      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [novels]

'Some time ago I left off the pamphlet shop in the passage to the Temple Exchange Coffee-house, and took "The North Briton" from the publisher of it, Mr Kearsley in Ludgate Street, hard by Child's. I have it now sent to me regularly by the Penny Post, and I read it with vast relish. There is a poignant acrimony in it that is very relishing. Noble also sends me from time to time a fresh supply of novels from his circulating library, so that I am very well provided with entertainment'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Boswell      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Lives of the convicts

'In my younger years I had read in the "Lives of the Convicts" so much about Tyburn that I had a sort of horrid eagerness to be there'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Boswell      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after dinner I wrought and read tell 4, and then I walked a litle abroad and, after I Cam home, read and [torn] tell all most 6'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after priuat praier I reed of the bible and wrought tell dinner time, before which I praied; and, after dinner, I continewed my ordenarie Course of working, reading, and dispossinge of busenes in the House, tell after 5:, at which time I praied, read a sermon, and examened my selfe'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [sermon]

'after priuat praier I reed of the bible and wrought tell dinner time, before which I praied; and, after dinner, I continewed my ordenarie Course of working, reading, and dispossinge of busenes in the House, tell after 5:, at which time I praied, read a sermon, and examened my selfe'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Diet of the Soul

'then I went a little about the house and reed of the diatt of the soul tell 5:, and then returned to priuat praier and medetacion, and so to readinge of the bible and walkinge tell supper'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then I Came home and did studie my lector, and read a whill'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I walked and kept Mr Hoby Compenie almost tel dinner time: then I reed a litle, and praied, and so to dinner: after which I hilped to read of the book for the placing of the people in the church to Mr Hoby, and then we went to church'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [a book of the pews in the church]

'I walked and kept Mr Hoby Compenie almost tel dinner time: then I reed a litle, and praied, and so to dinner: after which I hilped to read of the book for the placing of the people in the church to Mr Hoby, and then we went to church'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Manuscript: Codex

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then I hard Mr Rhodes read tell allmost dinner time'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praier I wrought a whill and hard Mr Rhodes read'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after that I walked abroade, then I Cam in and wrought, hard Mr Rhodes read, then I praied with Mr Rhodes'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [sermon - Revelation]

'M. Rhodes read a sarmon of the Reuel: and so went to bed'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then, after dinner, I walked, and hard Mr Rhodes Read'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then hard Mr Rhodes read, and so went to bed'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praier and breakfast I did read a whill for beinge not well, partly through myne owne folly'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, hard Euerill Read, and then praied, so went to supper'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Euerill Aske      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [letter]

'After priuat praier I did eate my breakfast, Read a Longe Letter and wret an other'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Manuscript: Letter

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then I walked, and took a Lector, and read tell Lector time: then I hard that, and so went to supper: ... and, after, reed a whill, and so went to bed'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then I did read a while to my workwemen, and then to the Lector'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after supper, hard Mr Rhodes read, and then went to priuat praier'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, hard him read, then praied, and so went to bed'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then I praied with Mr Rhodes and reed tell supper time: after, I hard publect prairs, and Reed of the testement'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then I Came home and reed to Mrs Ormstone'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so read tel supper Came'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then I dimed, and talked with some strangers that Came to visitt me, and after, being not well, I slept a while and then reed a while'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after dinner I wrought and hard Mr Rhodes Read tell all most supper time'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then I wrought and reed tell dinner time'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then I reed a hard readinge a whill'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'praied with Mr Rhodes, hard one read, and then went to priuat praier'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [ardenton's book]

'then I hard one read of ardentons book, and after I talked with Mr Rhodes'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [sermon]

'after dimer I talked a whill, and then wrought and hard Mr Maude read of a sermon'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Mr Maude      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [sermon]

'after, I hard Mr Maud read of a sarmon book, then I praied, after dinned: then then I wrought and hard Mr Maud read againe'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Mr Maude      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praier I went about the house, and reed, did eate my breakfast, then I reed againe tell dinner time, then praied'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after dinner I did read of a good book, and then went about the house: then I reed againe'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praier I did eate my breakfast, goe abowt, read of the bible, pray, and after dime: then I talked a while, reed, went about'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praers I Reed tell dinner time'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and after reed a while, and so went to supper'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then I caused one to Read vnto me'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'att :5: a cloke, I returned againe to examenation and praier: then I reed a whill and, after, went to supper'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and from thence came home and reed of Grenhame, and hard Megg Rhodes read'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after that, I hard him read tell all most night'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, hard mr Rhodes read praies, and went to bed'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I passed the afternone with Litle readinge because of my secknes'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After I hard Mr Rhodes Read of a good mans book, who proueth against Bis: Bilson that Christ suffered in soule the wrath of god and that he desended not into hell ... and hard Mr Rhodes Read of the same book'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'read tell diner time'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praier I reed a whill and then did eate my breakfast'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and, after, I wrought, hearinge Mr Rhodes Read of a booke against some newe spronge vp herisies'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then I reed a whill, after I went to supper'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after dinner I hard Mr Rhodes read'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after dinner I dressed vp my Clositte and read and, to refreshe my selfe beinge dull, I plaied and sunge to the Alpherion'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then wrought and hard Mr Rhodes read tell 4 acloke'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then Mr Rhodes reed to me tell 4'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'hard Mr Rhodes read'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then I walked a whill and hard one read'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and allmost all the afternone, I hard Mr Rhodes read'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'hard Mr Rhodes read, took order for supper'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'hard Mr Rhodes read, conferred with him Vpon some thinges touchinge himselfe'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I talked with a neighbour, then wrought a whill and hard Mr Rhodes read'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I kept Companie tell they departed and, after, reed and talked with a yonge papest maid'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then I dressed my patients, reed, talked with a neighbour, praied, then dined'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'gott Mr Hoby to Read some of perkines to me, and, after diner, I red as Longe as I Could my selfe'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I hard Mr Rhodes Read, and wrought, took order for supper'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praers I did eate, read, and then goe to the church'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praers I did eate, heare Mr Rhodes read, dressed my patients'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praer I did read, break my fast, and then went with Mr Hoby to the Garden'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'reed a whill of another good book, and then went to priuat medetations and praier'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after priuat praier and reading of the bible I did eate: then I hard M. Doman read'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and then wrought, reed, and wrett tell diner tim'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praier I did eate, read, and obsarued mine accustomed exercises tell night'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then I took order for supper and read abroad with Mr Hoby'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas and Margaret Hoby     Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then I hard the sarmon and after reed of a good book tell supper time'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praier I did eate, read, and was busie deliueringe some monie'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After I had praied I wrought, hearinge Mr Rhodes read tell dinner time'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After praers I did goe about the house and, hauing dune som busenes, I did eate a litle, read, and lastly dined'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praers I did read, eate, and went to the church'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After I had praied and reed, some of my freinds came, with whom I talked'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praers I reed, talked with my phesition and som other gentlewemen, and so went to dinner'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then Mr Hoby reed to me and an other gentlewoman Came to me, with whom I talked tell 5 a Clocke'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After I was readie I praied, then reed of the bible and an other good book, and after 10 a cloke...'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praier I dinned, then I walked about with my mother and reed, tell towardes night: then I praied priuatly and went to my booke again: after I went to supper and lastly to bed'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I was busie in the house, and walkinge and reading tell supper time'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praier I did read, eate, and so went to Church'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [prayer]

'then I went about a whill, and reed a praier, and then went to bed'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then went to priuat praer and reed a whill, and so went to bed'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I went to supper, then I reed, and lastly went to bed'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and, after, went about the house and reed a whill, and so went to bed'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I wrought tell all most 5 a cloke, and hard Mr Rhodes read'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and then wrought and hard Mr Rhodes read of the principles of poperie out of one of their owne bookes'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then I did eate, read, and after went to the church'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praere I did read to my wemen'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I wrought and hard Mr Rhodes read of a popeshe booke'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after I brake my fast, wrought, hard Mr Rhodes Read, took a lector'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I wrough and hard Mr Rhodes reead'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I wrought and hard Mr Rhodes reead of the testement and other good bookes'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and, when I had reed a whill, I went to dinner'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then I reed a whill and praied, and so went to bed'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then I kept in my Chamber workinge tell allmost night and hard my Cosine Isons Read'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Isons      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I reed, praied, and went to dinner'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after I Came in I reed, praied, and then went to dinner'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'all the followinge I went about and hard Mr Rhodes Read tell my time of priuat examenation and praier'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after priuat praers I reed, walked and medetated'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After I was readie I was Called to some busenes, which dine I went to priuat praier and readinge'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I reed and went to the church'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After I had gone about some busenes I praied priuatly, and after reed and took a lecture'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and, when I Came in, I reed a litle of humanitie, and then went to priuat examenation and praier'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and then I went to work and hard Mr Rhodes read'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praier I wrett notes in my testement, reed a whill, and went to the church'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praers I reed'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [sermon]

'after dinner I talked with som strangers that Came to Mr Hoby, wrought, reed a sarmon'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after diner, I went about a whill, hard Mr Rhodes Read, and then I went to priuat examenation and praier'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praier I did eate, read a whill, and then went to church'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [sermon]

'when they were gone, I reed and wrett in my sarmon booke'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'when I Came in, I wrought and reed tell 5 a cloke'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I reed a whill and so went to church'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and after reed and praied, and then I went to dinner'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [sermon]

'after diner I went to work, and hard Mr Rhodes read of a sarmon booke'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so, after priuat praers, I Reed a whill and so went to bed'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praers I did read, then I wrought a peece of work for a freind'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After I had praied I went about the house, then I hard Mr Rhodes read, took a lecture, praied, wrought, and went to dinner'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I praied and dined, and then I talked with my Mother and reed to hir'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I reed, praied, and dined'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After I had praied I brake my fast: after, I hard Mr Rhodes read, and wrought tell allmost dinner time'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After I was readie and had praied, I went about the house, wrought a whill, reed, and praied'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praers I reed and went to the church'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After praier I went about the house, and then went to my work and readinge'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then I hard Mr Rhodes read, and so I went to priuatt examenation and praier: after I went to supper'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After praer I wrought and hard Mr Rhodes read'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then I dined: after, I talked with my neighbours of that we had hard, and Reed some thinge to them'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Sermons]

'hard Mr Rhodes read of a sermon book'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after ward I talked with Mr Gregorie, hard Mr Rhodes read, and, after, I went to priuat medetation and praier'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I went to work and then I went about the house, hard Mr Rhodes read'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praier I reed and then went to church'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after I Came home I walked and reed, and then I went to priuat praier and examenation'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praers I did read and went about the house, and, after I had broken my fast, I went to church'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, dined: and then I talked and reed to some good wiffes that was with me'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praier I went about the house, and, hauinge eaten some thinge, I went to work, and hard Mr Rhodes read'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After praier I reed and went to church'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I went about and wrought, and hard Mr Rhodes read, and praied with him, and so went to supper'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after I diner I made an end of writinge my sarmon, then I walked, Red, and wrought'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I wrought, hard Mr Rhodes read, and then walked abroad into the feedles'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praier I reed a whill to my mother, and then went to the church'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then I talked and reed to some good wiues that dined [with] me'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'at the time of praier, I returned to priuat examenation, praier, and reading: after, I went to supper'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praier I reed, did eate my breakfast, and then went to the church'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then dined: after, I talked of the sarmon, and reed to the good wiues that was with me, and then I praied and againe went to the church'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I reed, wrett diuers notes'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'some thinge I did eate, and then did reed, and made prouision for som strangers that Came'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after I reed and so went to supper'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and, after, I hard a good booke reed by Mr Vrpeth, and sonne after I went to supper'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [sermon]

'and, when the sarmon was don, I Came in and hard Mr Ardington Read a sarmon'

Unknown
Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Mr Ardington      

  

[unknown] : [sermon]

'and then I hard Mr Ardington read a sarmon and talked with hime tell allmost night'

Unknown
Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Mr Ardington      

  

[unknown] : [sermon]

'and, after Diner, I went about the house, wrett 2. letters, hard Mr Rhodes read a sarmon, then walked with Mr Ardington'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then I went to work and hard readinge'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I reed and praied and so dined'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praier I went to the Church when I had reed and eaten somethinge ... and when I had reed a whill, I went to priuat examenation and praier'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I wrought and hard Mr Genking Read tell 4 a cloke'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I reed abroad'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after I dined, I wrought, walked and reed tell allmost night'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I reed, praied, was busie about waxe lights, and then I dined'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and, after I had reed a whill, I went to priuat examenation and praier: then to supper'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'was so ill that I Could not goe to the publecke exercises, but Mr Hoby reed in the morninge to me and praied with me'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'this day I Continewed my orderarie exercises of praier and readinge'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praier and readinge a whill I went to the church ... then dined: after, I talked [with] some of my neighbours and then reed againe ... I went againe to the church: then I reed a whill'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'All but the times of my ordenarie exercises of praier and readinge I was busie takinge order for my going to london, and packinge of thinges'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praier I went to worke tell dinner time: after, I wrought and reed, and was accompened with Mr Edward Gatt and after with Mistress Mari. Gatt'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and, after I had reed and praied, I went to supper'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praier I went to my booke, and after I dined'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praier I went to my booke, and wrett a letter to Mr Rhodes: then I dined ... and after I went to my booke: then to supper'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praers I reed, and talked with Mr Vrpith'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praiers I went to readinge: then I was busie tell diner time ... then I returned home, and reed, and after I was Veseted by my brother'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [sermon]

'and then I reed a sarmon, and so, hauinge praied, went to supper'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then I went to Read a whill and, when I had praied, I went to bed'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [sermon]

'After praiers I went to diner: after, I went to a standinge to se the quene Come to London, were I Reed a serome'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I went to worke, and read, and so, when I had praied and supped, I went to bed'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I reed and wrought and was Vesited by my brother, and, after I had praied and suped, I reed and so went to bed'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After prairs, I reed and dined'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After I had praied I reed, and went to diner'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After I was readie, and had praied and reed, I walked'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I walked and was veseted by my Cousine Cookes wiffe, and, after they were gone, I went to readinge and praier'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praier I reed, and walked to the Comune Garden'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After praiers I reed, and wrett to Mr Rhodes'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and I had praied, reed, wrought, and dined'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and when I Came home I went to priuat readinge and praier'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I busied myself in my Chamber and then went to priuatt readinge and praier'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I went to Mr Egertons sermon and so, within litle time, I went to priuat readinge and praier, and settinge downe some notes I had Colected'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and, when he was gome, I went to priuat praier and readinge'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after supper I went againe to priuat praier and reading, and so to bed'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After my praier and readinge I went into the feedles with Mistress Thornbrow ... and, after she was gone, I went to priuat praier and readinge, and so to supper'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praier and readinge I went to walk'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praier and readinge I went to worke'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and so, after, I went to priuat praier and reading'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'had so great a Cough that I Could not goe abroad, nor the next day goe to church, but exercised my selfe at home in writinge, readinge, and prainge, as well as I Could'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'at night I went to priuat praier and readinge'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'at my accustomed time I went to priuat praier and readinge'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after I Cam home I was pained in the toothach which Continewed with me 4 days after, in which time I exercised prainge and readinge as I was able'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After praiers And readinge I went to diner'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praier and readinge I went to worke'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuatt praier I went to readinge and worke tell diner'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'this day I, beinge not well, praied and reed in mine owne chamber'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'this day was rainie so that I Could nor durst goe abroad but exersised in the house, with prainge and reading and singing psa[lms], and Conferinge'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After prairs I went to work, and, hauinge reed a Litle, I talked with some that Came to Dine with vs'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praiers I brake my fast and reed'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After, I went to priuat readinge and medetation'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'this day I kept my chamber, and, as I was able, I wrought and reede and had Mr Ardington read to me and Mr Rhodes'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'this day I kept my chamber, and, as I was able, I wrought and reede and had Mr Ardington read to me and Mr Rhodes'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Mr Ardington      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'this day I kept my chamber, and, as I was able, I wrought and reede and had Mr Ardington read to me and Mr Rhodes'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After my accustomed prairs I did eate and read'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then, after diner, I ... Continewed to exercis my selfe in some busenes tell praier, hauing Mr Rhodes and Mr Ardington to read to me'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then, after diner, I ... Continewed to exercis my selfe in some busenes tell praier, hauing Mr Rhodes and Mr Ardington to read to me'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Mr Ardington      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I hard Mr Ardington Read, and reed my selfe a Catzisimie of the Lord supper'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Mr Ardington      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then I wrought and hard Mr Rhodes read'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then I praied and reed, dined'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'this day, for prainge, readinge and workinge, I Continewed my ordenarie exercises, with much Comfort and peace of Conscience, I thanke god, hauinge Learned some thing from Mr Rhodes his readinge vnto me, as, first, that no Callinge is lawfull with out a growne for itt in godes word: 2., that the title of Lord Archbusshopes are Vnlawfull: 3., that no minister should be made without a minestrie and charge, vnto which he should be ordained'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'this day, for prainge, readinge and workinge, I Continewed my ordenarie exercises, with much Comfort and peace of Conscience, I thanke god, hauinge Learned some thing from Mr Rhodes his readinge vnto me, as, first, that no Callinge is lawfull with out a growne for itt in godes word: 2., that the title of Lord Archbusshopes are Vnlawfull: 3., that no minister should be made without a minestrie and charge, vnto which he should be ordained'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I returned in to my Chamber, and there reed and praied tell all most I went to supper'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'the rest of the day, after the afternone sermon, I spent in readinge, singing, praing, and hearinge repeticions'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After prairs and readinge I kept Mr Gatt Companie'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after Diner, I wrought and hard Mr Rhodes read'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, walked about with Hoby, and then returned to priuatt reading and praier'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I went about the howse, and then reed and wrought a whill before diner'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then I went to priuatt prairs and medetation and readinge'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After I had reed and praied I went about the house'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and, after, went to readinge and preparation for the next day'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'this day it pleased god to blesse my reading and medetation, and, in the afternone my hearinge of Mr Vrpith: after, I Came home and Caused Mr Stillington to Read of Grenhame, and, after, I went to priuatt readinge and praier'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'was buseed about that all day tell night, at which time Iohn Corrow praied and reed publeckly'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: John Corrow      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and after went to readinge and medetation'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'hard Mr Rhodes read'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I dined, and after I talked and reed to some good wiffes: after, I praied and reed, and wrett notes in my bible of the morninge exercise'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I dined, and after I talked and reed to some good wiffes: after, I praied and reed, and wrett notes in my bible of the morninge exercise'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after supper, I hard Mr Aston praie and reade, and so went to bed'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Mr Aston      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I Came home and hard Mr Rhodes read: after diner I went abroad, and when I come home I dresed some sores: after, I hard Mr Rhodes read, and wrought with in a while'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I kept my chamber, and hard Iohn Corrow and Mr Rhodes read to me'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I kept my chamber, and hard Iohn Corrow and Mr Rhodes read to me'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: John Corrow      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I hard this day, after I had praied, Mr Rhodes read the booke of my lord Esixe treason, and I wrought: and so like wise in the after none Iohn Corrow and he did read by Course vnto me tell a litle before I went to priuat praier and medetation'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: John Corrow      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After praier I wrough, and hard Mr Rhodes and younge Coroow read'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After praier I wrough, and hard Mr Rhodes and younge Coroow read'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: John Corrow      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'In the morning I praied, hard Mr Rhodes read, and wrought'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After praier I went to the church, and, after, I Came from thence, I praied and reed: after, I dined: then, I talked a whill, and after, wrett notes in my bible, and reed, tell church time'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I reed, and wrought tell :2: a cloke'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After praier I wrought, reed, went about the house, and praied againe before diner'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After praier I went to work, and hard Mr Rhodes read of a good booke'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuat praier I reed of the bible, and so went to the church: after, I Came home, and after diner I reed a Litle to som good wiffes'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuatt prairs I reed abroad [with] my Cosine Dakine'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuatt prairs I reed abroad [with] my Cosine Dakine: after I Came home and that I had dined, I talked of good matters [with] him, and he reed to me, and after we went forthe and sawe some sheepe which he was to buy'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Dakin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after diner, I hard Mr Rhodes read, and wrought'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and, sonne after, went to priuatt prairs and readinge'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I praied, dined, and reed, and Conferred of good thinges to such wemen as dined with me'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'at my accustomed Hower, I returned to priuatt readinge and praier'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Book of Discipline

'hard Mr Rhodes read of the true diCeplen of christes church'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'this day I Continewed my accustomed exercises, and wrough, hard Mr Ardington read, and singe psa: tell I went to priuatt praier'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Mr Ardington      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'then I busied my selfe about the house, and hard some readinge, and after I went to priuatt praier'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'in the afternone Mr Ardington Reed to me'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Mr Ardington      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after, I went to my Clositt, and there reed and praied'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After prairs I wrought, and hard Mr Ardington Reed'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Mr Ardington      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After prairs I wrought, as I was accustomed, with my maides, and hard Mr Ardington read: and, after I had dined and had slept a Litle, I went to worke againe, and hard Mr Ardington againe'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Mr Ardington      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and then read and praied priuatly'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and after diner I went about, and walked abroad, and hard Mr Ardington read'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Mr Ardington      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After priuatt praiers I reed, and kept Companie with Mrs Girlington and diuers that Came'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'After piruatt praier I went about the house, and hard Mr Rhodes read'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Rhodes      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'after the sarmon and dimer, I reed to the wiues and talked of the sarmon'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'reed to the good wiffes, as I had wont, after dinner'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and after dinner I reed to some good neighbours'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I Continewed well, I thanke god, these daies: and reed some medetations of the Lady Bowes hir Makinge'

Unknown
Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'this day I Continewed to heare, and read, and pray, I praise god, [with] much Comfort as before'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I haue Continewed my duties or praier and readinge, both findinge my corruption and receiuinge stringth

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and hard from my Cossine Arthur dakine: and so, in the afternone likewise, hard some readinge of a book he sent me'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'towarde Night I went to my accostomed exercises of Readinge and praier'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'priuatt praier and readinge'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and after the exercises I went to readinge and priuatt praier'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and after dinner went into the Garden, vntill I retourned to priuat praier and readinge'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and at night I went to priuatt readinge and praier'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and in the afternone I went to priuatt prairs and readinge'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and at night returned to priuat readinge and praier'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and towardes night I went to priuatt readinge and praier'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and after they were gone I retourned to Readinge and priuat praier'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and after went to priuatt praier and readinge'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'towardes Night I went to priuatt praier and readinge'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and after I had praied I went to readinge'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'at Night I went to priuatt readinge and praier'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'and towardes night went to priuatt readinge and praier'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'priuat Readinge'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Hoby      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'During the daytime I could not gain sufficient solitude for reading my little story books and was obliged to use the only secure retreat - the long, narrow, WC. In much later years, when my family was "too much with me", I was again driven to use this apartment in order to polish verses'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Zoe Procter      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [nineteenth-century poets]

'Early in 1888 my grandmother was taken ill, and my sister Mary and I went daily to Albert Hall Mansions to help my eldest sister and do errands for her. I spent many hours sitting on the floor by one of the rosewood vaneer book cases, which I still possess, reading a varied assortment of works ranging from the Ehtics of Aristotle, through all the nineteenth century poets, down to the poems of Bulwer Lytton, written under the name of Owen Meredith.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Zoe Procter      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Girls' Own Paper

'I kept my hours conscientiously, but when I had no work to do I read continuously. I read parts of "The Times", the "Standard" and the "Morning Post" ever day. The theatrical and policitcal news interested me more than anything else. The study was lined with book shelves, and besides all the classical writers there was a large section filled with the works of French dramatists. I read several plays by Marivaux, and found, to my astonishment, that a serial I had read in the "Girls' Own Paper" had its origin in one of his plays. Encouraged by this, I wrote a play which also derived from a play by Marivaux.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Zoe Procter      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : Prison Regulations

'I find a copy of the "Prison Regulations" for December 1938: European rations total over three pounds daily and Japanese 2lbs 10oz. I give this in to the Committee as evidence'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Kitching      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [sign]

'Notice over the bakery - "Wedding Cakes A Speciality"'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Kitching      Manuscript: Graffito

  

[unknown] : [marginalia in Dandelion Days]

'I get a library book, "Dandelion Days". Written on the back cover is an extraordinary message deated 15.1.42 at the General Hopsital, thus: "23.25 - what the hell has the night sister done to me? Injection refused but given some other awful stuff - made to feel like a drunk in five minutes - didn't ask for anything - or injection - God, she's a bitch. Evacuated from Penang and now a thorough defeatist - anti-everything. I feel stewed except the pain in my leg has not gone." Signature illegible.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Kitching      Manuscript: Graffito

  

[unknown] : Oxford Advanced Atlas

'I start making star charts and revising my geographical knowledge generally with the aid of a very good atlas - the Oxford Advanced - borrowed from Bayley'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Kitching      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [notice]

'A notice appears on the board: "The Indian policemen on duty are Japanese subjects and you must obey them as you do the Japanese sentries. If internees do not bow to Indian policemen sentries, they will be severely punished". Bow-wow."

Unknown
Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Kitching      

  

[unknown] : [notice]

'The B-Block strip of grass between the high wall and the passage is now open. It is to be a haven of peace for readers and others. There is to be no talking. So there is a notice: "B-Sanctuary. Do not pluck the flowers or disturb the wildlife. You may sleep, but do not snore. Keep your B-trap shut. Silence is golden. Gather riches here".'

Unknown
Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Kitching      

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'A quotation from a book I am reading says: "The only way to waste time is not to enjoy it." How one realises that as an internee!'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Kitching      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : postcard

'Forbes has three postcards; one marked "Try Singapore, then Batavia". This shows there must be internees in Batavia and gives me some hope that Nora may be there, although I don't think much of the chance.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Kitching      Manuscript: postcard

  

[unknown] : Wonderful Britain

'I am reading volume four of "Wonderful Britain". It is attractively illustrated, particularly to an interned exile. What attracts me specifically, apart from the pictures, are articles on things to see around London, Manchester and Sheffield - Wansdyke and Offa's dyke, the magic of the fens.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Kitching      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Walking in the Grampians

'I finish reading "Walking in the Grampians". If Nora's alive, I swear we will do some of them WHEN this bloody war is over.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Kitching      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Golden Treasury

'To bunk. Finished reading Aldington's brochure on Lawrence. A slight thing. Odds. Wrote home. Reading. Supper. Finished reading Book I of "Golden Treasury". Sisters and nurses here all very decent.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: William Soutar      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'To bunk about 8.0. Reading.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: William Soutar      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [ballads]

'Read a couple of ballads to Eve.'

Unknown
Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: William Soutar      

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read to-day that Corot, Degas, Manet, Cezanne were all "paternal parasites" as regards money - if I can do my share in the Scottish Renaissance perhaps I'll justify my parasitism yet.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: William Soutar      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Writing and reading: continue to wrestle with words in a very sticky fashion.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: William Soutar      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Writing and reading: To have the great masters always before one is the most thorough searchlight upon self-esteem: especially is this necessary for any Scot - since a literary reputation is so easily won here.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: William Soutar      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : Edward

'Just before tea, I read the ballad "Edward"; of its kind, it is as great a poem as "The Wife of Usher's Well"; there is the imprint of a fine artist upon this ballad, as the form of the verses in itself reveals.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: William Soutar      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [chemistry]

'Read a little Alison and much chemistry, but a little headachy and out of order.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Italian]

'Read a little Plato; wrote a long letter to Brown; wrote a chapter of book; walked; read some Italian, and got some valuable notes out of Waagen, and then a game at Chess.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Italian]

'Read a little Italian. Finished first vol. Waagen.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [Greek]

'read some Greek'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Art Union

'Blackguardly letter in "Art Union", and interesting one in Rippingille's thing, to be answered; the last at great length.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : Witness

'Curious account in the "Witness" of a rock, 8 tons in weight, being carried three hundred yards over sand by ice.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : Guardian

'I read, as I was sitting at the window, during the sunset of one of the most burning and brilliant days I remember out of Italy, among several other papers, the 81st, of the "Guardian", wherein I was much pleased first by that soliloquy attributed to Alcibiades, of which I would fain see the original, and again by the conclusion'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : Guardian

'Note the definition of a critic in "Guardian" No.103: "A man who on all occasions is more attentive to what is wanting that to what is present."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : Guardian

'I must interrupt myself to note the 86th paper in the "Guardian" useful to my chapter on penetrative imagination.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : Guardian

'Note the passage in the 93rd paper of "Guardian" respecting our admiration of the oder of motions of heavenly bodies, to be expressed by imitation of this order in our lives, and conf. Dante, "Inferno" VII. 75-80.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Serial / periodical

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'I read today in Galignani part of an acrimonious and of what I fear will become an indecent controversy between the Archibishop of Canterbury and the Bishop of Exeter, respecting Infant Regeneration by Baptism.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : Journal pour tous

'Nothing much learned today except, by glance at the "Journal pour tous", the fact ascertained that French as well as English write foolish romances in quantities.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Unknown

  

[unknown] : [geology]

'Read only Geology'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [geology]

'Read Geology ... and Plato to p. 281. In which note that one great point is got at, respecting justice, that all "hurting" people makes them worse. 281, 7 &c.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [geology]

'Read geology'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read to children under tree.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Pleasant evening reading about Pultowa and Mazeppa to my mother.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read 10th Psalm in Rose's book this morning; planned commentary on it.'

Unknown
Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      

  

[unknown] : [life of Lord Byron]

'Alone with my mother in evening; read life of Byron'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Reading, Rusch all in forenoon'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [geology]

'Read geology at my breakfast with my two loveliest flint-chalcedonies shining in the sun.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [history]

'Read of Charles of Anjou and Manfred.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [poems]

'Read old poems of 1848. I have gained something in these twenty-two years.'

Unknown
Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      

  

[unknown] : [history]

'Read of Empress Theodora'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [history]

'read economy of 12th century'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Roman de la rose [?]

'Yesterday after reading "Romance of Rose" thought much of the destruction of all my higher power of sentiment by late sorrow'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read Rouen missal with advantage'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Read glacier theory and got interested in old things'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Roman de la rose [?]

'Worked a little on "Romance of Rose"'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Drew a little, and read a French novel, and am singularly better in health.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Down after reading carefully and analysing a year of Scott's life (first at Ashtiel), to draw Francesca leaves.'

Unknown
Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Still in bed to breakfast, reading of Scott's early hours'

Unknown
Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      

  

[unknown] : [Moschele's life]

'Read Moschele's life in bed to breakfast, delicious, and Part of II Esdras I.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'recovered in evening greatly, reading Scott's life and seeing Turner's Okehampton more beautiful than ever'

Unknown
Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      

  

[unknown] : Munera

'For National debt read "Munera" page 32. Read the first statement of the principles of currency, "Munera" Chap. III 66-80.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [French novel]

'finally concluding in reading a French novel'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Expectans expectavi

'Last night I was led to read "Expectans expectavi", and to understand it for the first time.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Mariegola

'read twelve chapters of "Mariegola"'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Eyes more weary than usual in reading a little by candlelight'

Unknown
Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      

  

[unknown] : Ariadne

'Read, fortunately, my St John's day extract, in "Ariadne", about dreams: helpful much again, now.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'read St Francis' Hymn of the Creatures to my infinite delight'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : Roma Sotternea

'At Rose, reading "Roma Sotteranea".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Reading by gaslight at breakfast - unwholesome'

Unknown
Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      

  

[unknown] : Aladdin

'Joan and I by ourselves in the evening played old tunes and read "Aladdin".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] : [unknown]

'Slept well, though Joan teazing in evening playing with beads when I was reading.'

Unknown
Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      

  

[unknown] : [French novel]

'rather enjoyed a bit of absurd French novel'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

[unknown] [unknown] : [Natural History]

'I would not, I could not, give up the rides and rambles that took up so much of my time, but I would try to overcome my disinclination to serious reading. There were plenty of books in the house it was always a puzzle to me how we came to have so many. I was familiar with their appearance on the shelves they had been before me since I first opened my eyes their shape, size, colours, even their titles, and that was all I knew about them. A general Natural History and two little works by James Rennie on the habits and faculties of birds was all the literature suited to my wants in the entire collection of three or four hundred volumes. For the rest I had read a few story-books and novels: but we had no novels; when one came into the house it would be read and lent to our next neighbour five or six miles away, and he in turn would lend to another twenty miles further on, until it disappeared into space'. I made a beginning with Rollin's "Ancient History" in two huge quarto volumes; I fancy it was the large clear type and numerous plates [...] that determined my choice. Rollin the good old priest, opened a new, wonderful world to me, and instead of the tedious task I feared the reading would prove,it was as delightful as it had formerly been to listen to my brother's endless histories of imaginary heroes and their wars and adventures. Still athirst for history, after finishing Rollin I began fingering other works of that kind: there was Whiston's "Josephus", too ponderous a book to be held in the hands when read out of doors; and there was Gibbon in six stately volumes. I was not yet able to appreciate the lofty artificial style, and soon fell upon something better suited to my boyish taste in letters - a "History of Christianity" in, I think, sixteen or eighteen volumes of a convenient size. [...] These biographies sent me to another old book, "Leland on Revelation", which told me much I was curious to know about the mythologies and systems of philosophy of the ancients [...]. Next came Carlyle's "French Revolution", and at last Gibbon, and I was still deep in the "Decline and Fall" when disaster came to us, my father was practically ruined.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: William Henry Hudson      Print: Book

  

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