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the experience of reading in Britain, from 1450 to 1945...

Reading Experience Database UK Historical image of readers
 
 
 
 

Listings for Author:  

Tacitus

  

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Tacitus : 

[Editorial commentary on Macaulay's reading]: "His manuscript notes extend through the long range of Greek authors from Hesiod to Athenaeus, and of Latin authors from Cato the Censor, - through Livy, and Sallust, and Tacitus, and Aulus Gellius, and Suetonius, -down to the very latest Augustan histories."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Tacitus : [unknown]

[Sedgwick read the 'Essay' twice in 1811]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Adam Sedgwick      

  

Tacitus : Siege of Jerusalem, The

'Even during their elopement in Switzerland and Germany in 1814, Shelley read to her: "the siege of Jerusalem" from Tacitus is read by Lake Lucerne, and as they sail to Mainz he "read aloud to us Mary Wollstonecraft's 'Letters from Norway'."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Percy Bysshe Shelley      Print: Book

  

Tacitus : Histories Book V

Journals of Mary Shelley "M. & S. walk to the shore of the lake & read the description of the seige of Jerusalem in Tacitus"

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Percy Bysshe Shelley      Print: Book

  

Tacitus : Agricola

"Now it was translating Tacitus, in order to try what was the utmost compression of style that I could attain.".."I went into such an enthusiasm over the original, and especially over the celebrated concluding passage, that I thought I would translate it, and correct it by Dr Aitkins, which I could procure from our public library".

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Print: Book

  

Tacitus : Annales

'Finish the 2nd vol. of Adele - write - read Curt. In the evening we go up to Diodati - Shelley finishes the Panegyric of Trajan and begins Tacitus'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Percy Bysshe Shelley      Print: Book

  

Tacitus : Annales

'Read Curt. out in the boat with Shelley who reads Tacitus - translate and in the evening read Adele & Theodore'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Percy Bysshe Shelley      Print: Book

  

Tacitus : Annales

'Shelley reads Tacitus and I read Curt.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Percy Bysshe Shelley      Print: Book

  

Tacitus : Annales

'Write and finish Walther - In the evening I go out in the boat with Shelley - and he afterwards goes up to Diodati - begin one of Madame de Genlis novels - Shelley finishes Tacitus'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Percy Bysshe Shelley      Print: Book

  

Tacitus : Germania

'read "Contes moreaux de Marmotel - Shelley reads the Germania of Tacitus'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Percy Bysshe Shelley      Print: Book

  

Tacitus : Germania

'Shelley reads Germania and "memoire d'un Detenu".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Percy Bysshe Shelley      Print: Book

  

Tacitus : Germania

'Read Curt. and Caroline of Litchfield. Hobhouse and Scroop Davis come to Diodati - Shelley spends the evening there & reads Germania - Several books arrive among others Coleridges Christabel which Shelley reads aloud to me before we go to bed'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Percy Bysshe Shelley      Print: Book

  

Tacitus : Annales

'Read Tacitus'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Shelley      Print: Book

  

Tacitus : Annales

'Read Tacitus and St Helena manuscript'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Shelley      Print: Book

  

Tacitus : Annales

'Read Tacitus and Buffon. S. reads Homer and Plutarch'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Shelley      Print: Book

  

Tacitus : Annales

'Finish the 11th book of Tacitus - Read some of Beaumont & X Fletchers plays - work - S. write - reads some of the plays of Sophocles - & Antony & Cleopatra of Shakespeare and Othello aloud'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Shelley      Print: Book

  

Tacitus : Annales

'Read Tacitus and the three brothers - S reads Gibbon'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Shelley      Print: Book

  

Tacitus : Annales

'Finish Annals of Tacitus - begin Terence - read Guy Mannering'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Shelley      Print: Book

  

Publius Cornelius Tacitus : Unknown

'During the last week I have also read the latter half of 'Maria Stuart' - some scenes of Alfieri - and a portion of 'Tacitus' (which by the way is the hardest Latin I ever saw) - when you devoted four hours of my day to the study of history, what did you mean should become of my Italian and my dear German?'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Jane Baillie Welsh      Print: BookManuscript: Letter

  

Tacitus : Annals

'Read Tacitus'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Shelley      Print: Book

  

Tacitus : Annals

'S. reads Chaucer's flower and the leaf & then Chaucer's dream to me. Read Tacitus.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Shelley      Print: Book

  

Tacitus : Histories

'We talked of Tacitus, and I hazarded an opinion that with all his merit for penetration, shrewdness of judgment, and terseness of expression, he was too compact, too much broken into hints as it were, and therefore too difficult to be understood. To my great satisfaction Dr. Johnson sanctioned this opinion. "Tacitus, sir, seems to me rather to have made notes for an historical work than to have written a history".'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Johnson      Print: Book

  

Tacitus : Histories

'We talked of Tacitus, and I hazarded an opinion that with all his merit for penetration, shrewdness of judgment, and terseness of expression, he was too compact, too much broken into hints as it were, and therefore too difficult to be understood. To my great satisfaction Dr. Johnson sanctioned this opinion. "Tacitus, sir, seems to me rather to have made notes for an historical work than to have written a history".'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Boswell      Print: Book

  

Tacitus : Annals

'[letter to Dr S.] It was the perusal of Tacitus, in Murphy's translation, which first excited the idea in my mind [of writing a book of moral education based on the behaviour of eminent historical figures]'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Hamilton      Print: Book

  

Cornelius Tacitus : Opera omnia

Many MS notes, some of which are transcribed from those of Lord Macaulay in another edition: "Macaulay's notes and marginal lines (on the outside margins) are transferred from his Bipontine edition. His notes are marked with an "M"." Sir George's dates of reading include: "Florence Jan. 22 1901. The day of Queen Victoria's death"; Jam 25 1901 "On way from Florence to Rome, Edward the Seventh proclaimed yesterday"; June 22 1920; Aug 2 1924 "Read with unceasing zest and admiration. May I live to finish him! But I was 86 last month"; p.740: "a rare good writer. But a very difficult one to read, I must confess, as a student of very mature age (1924)"; Dec 24 1924 "With Herodotus and Thucydides, he appertains to the first three historians of the Ancient World. I am reading them all again, with Suetonius if indeed I can live to finish them. This is the 4th time in this century that I have read them all through"; Jan 17 1925. P.1629, Sir George writes: "The development of Nero is a marvellous story, marvellously told; - as Carlyle would have written it, had he been a Roman of the age of Tacitus. I read it as I read the "French Revolution" in the Trinity backs in the summer of 1858, when I ought to have been reading Pindar and Thucydides. That summer I read the French Revolution three times on end [underlined twice]; besides devouring the Third Volume of "Modern Painters" and "Men and Women". As far as a place in the classical Tripos was concerned I doubt if I could have been better employed." P.2750: "As fine history, and as much to my mind, as any I ever read. Tacitus was much the same age as Carlyle, when he wrote the French Revolution, - which I read as an undergraduate at Trinity; reading three times through one end, with no book between. I did very much the same by this volume of Tacitus in the course of this winter, at 87 years of age."

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: George Otto Trevelyan      Print: Book

  

Tacitus : unknown

Robert Southey to Grosvenor Charles Bedford, 25 January - 8 February 1793: 'Over the pages of the philosophic Tacitus the hours of study pass rapidly as even those which are devoted to my friends & I have not found as yet one hour which I could wish to have employed otherwise this is saying very much in praise of a collegiate life but remember that a mind disposed to be happy will find happiness everywhere & why we should not be happy is beyond my philosophy to account for Heraclitus certainly was a fool & what is much more rare an unhappy one.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Southey      Print: Book

  

Tacitus : Annals

Robert Southey to Grosvenor Charles Bedford, 26- c.29 April 1794: 'I have ventured upon the drama at last. & chosen for my subject that memorable passage in Tacitus which struck me so powerfully on the first perusal & which I pointed out to you at Brixton. possibly you may have forgotten it. if so turn to the fourteenth annal & read the murder of Pedanius Secundus & the execution of four hundred slaves. tis a bloody tale. with what success I manage it you will judge hereafter.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Southey      Print: Book

  

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