Author Archives: Yvette Howley

About Yvette Howley

Research Support Officer at The Open University

Thinking about social media data management…

Are you planning to use social media data for your research? If so, a recent talk by Ben Wills-Eve at Lancaster Data Conversations may interest you. Entitled ‘Social Media Data Management for Digital Humanities,’ Ben takes you through some of things you should have on your radar when using data from social media platforms like Twitter. Ethical use of data, adhering to data usage policies, copyright, data processing, access to data via APIs (application programming interfaces), data storage, coding/programming, are some of the areas Ben talked about. Before using data from Twitter, Facebook, or any other social media sites it is essential that you read and understand their policies first.

Attendees were signposted to some useful guidance, such as the Association of Internet Researchers (AoIR) documents on ethical internet research, and reference was made to an interesting paper on the challenges of using historical Twitter data, and deleted Tweets, ethically. The Programming Historian site may also be useful to explore. Not only are the tutorials free and Open Access, they could be just what you need to enhance digital skills you already have, or to learn new ones! The Beginner’s Guide to Twitter Data is an example of what they offer.

If you have any queries about your Data Management Plans, or want to find out more about the ethics of obtaining research data, please visit our Library Research Support website or get in touch with the team.

 

News you may have missed…The OU signs the Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA)

In November, The OU’s Vice-Chancellor Professor Tim Blackman signed the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA). DORA has been signed by over 16,500 individuals and by over 2,000 organisations worldwide so far, in a commitment to making research assessment fair and transparent: –

“Under this agreement, the OU commits to not allocating staff career advancement opportunities based on Journal Impact Factors (JIFs). In its DORA implementation plan it will make explicit the criteria used for attracting, retaining and developing a diverse research community. The OU will recognise the importance of processes for staff evaluation that are transparent and evidence-based, as part of a culture that aims to be fully inclusive.”

To find out more, take a look at the OU’s news item and read the OU’s official DORA statement, and to keep up-to-date with developments, the DORA blog is a useful read and they can be followed on Twitter @DORAssessment.

OFS funding competition to improve access and participation for BAME groups in PGR study

Research England and the Office for Students (OFS) have launched a joint funding competition for project proposals to ‘improve access and participation for black, Asian, and minority ethnic groups in postgraduate research (PGR) study in the English higher education sector.’

Details of the scheme can be found on the OFS website and the deadline for bids is noon on 28th January 2021.

If you are interested, please contact Dr Lindsay O’Dell, OU Graduate School Director, with any queries.

Creative Commons

Getting to know Creative Commons licences is important when choosing to reuse images or other content in your research outputs, whether they are journal articles, posters, or presentations. Here’s a handy guide to the suite of Creative Commons licences to help you and take a look at the Creative Commons website; it is a great source of information, as well as home to their ever growing CC Search portal. Any content that has been released under a CC licence should have a statement or an icon that indicates which licence applies. You will find this detail in a variety of places within journal articles, as you can see in the examples below. If you decide to use an image, graph, or a graphic from papers released under a CC licence, follow the terms of the licence and credit them appropriately.

     

Images from photo hosting sites such as Flickr, Wikipedia, Unsplash, Pixabay etc. make their licences clear. Flickr, for instance, allows you to search and filter by Creative Commons licence type and details of the licence will be on the image main page.

 

Follow the terms of the licence and credit the creator. See the example below: –

Droid Gingerbread. https://flic.kr/p/9WkVzT This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution Licence https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

 

If you have any questions about Creative Commons or copyright in general, please get in touch with us and look out for a copyright training session for postgraduate researchers in the autumn term!  library-research-support@open.ac.uk