Show & TEL: Presentations – 10th November 2020

AGENDA
OpenTEL: Show & TEL
10th November 2020 (09:30 – 16:00)
** Join Online Here **
Link for students and external participants

09:30 – 09:40     Welcome and Introduction
Eileen Scanlon  

09:45 – 10:05     Presentation 1:
Introducing RoboLab: an integrated robot simulator and Jupyter notebook environment for teaching and learning basic robot programming
Tony Hirst

10:10 – 10:30     Presentation 2:
Impact of the OpenLearn Create course ‘Support Through Court: Domestic Abuse’
Elizabeth FitzGerald and Hugh McFaul Continue reading

Ethics in Educational Technology Project

In the past six months educational technology has received an increasing amount of attention in the media, as many schools and universities have begun teaching at a distance. Rather than a recent fad however, educational technology has a long history going back several decades, although recent events have catalysed uptake. As educational technology becomes increasingly integrated into learning in schools, universities, workplaces, and people’s free-time, it is more important than ever to consider how to use it ethically.

With this in mind, the Open University’s openTEL research group has initiated a project to examine the ethics surrounding technology enhanced learning (TEL). Often ethics is spoken about in relation to one TEL domain (such as AI or learning analytics), but, in reality, most issues span the gamut of topics in TEL. Data ownership is as relevant to accessibility or citizen science as it is to learning analytics. The Ethics in TEL (EthTEL) project therefore examines ethical issues around educational technology holistically.

If you would like to share your experiences and opinions on ethics in educational technology, then EthTEL is currently collecting answers to a short survey. The survey can be accessed at https://bit.ly/edtechethics and should take around 10 minutes to complete. Whether you’ve experienced educational technology as a student, educator, learning designer, researcher, or some other role, we’d love to hear from you!

The results of the survey will be posted in a freely available report on the openTEL webpage.

If you’d like to hear more about the EthTEL project then please join us at the next Show and TEL event on 2nd November. Guests external to the OU will be able to join using the link https://bit.ly/OUedtech.

Guidance: Designing Learning for Autistic and Neurodiverse Students

Designing learning for autistic and neurodiverse students

Collaboratively created guidance from the OpenTEL Open & Inclusive SIG, July 2020

Autism and neurodiversity

Autism and neurodiversity are labels used to describe people who have certain differences in the way in which they think and in the way they interact with society. Typically, people on the autism spectrum may be less aware of, bound by, aligned to or responsive to societal expectations or constraints. This different way of thinking can be an enormous strength, and some great thinkers and innovators are autistic. However, this can lead to challenges for autistic people, especially in settings like the workplace and education, where specific things are expected that might not align with an autistic person’s skills or abilities.

This guide aims to help raise awareness of some of the differences autistic people may experience, and to help educators design learning, activities, tutorials and assessment that can help autistic students demonstrate their potential on a more level playing field.  It was collaboratively created with autistic people (OU staff and students.)

Terminology

Language and terminology used to describe autism is highly debated, so we start with a note on the definitions and terminology chosen for this guidance.  Continue reading

Young People’s use of nQuire to Ascertain Adults Perception of and Attitudes Towards Single-Use Plastic

By Dr. Charlotte Dean, University of Hull; School of Education

This article describes how young people participating in the University of Hull’s Plastic Citizen project utilised nQuire to tackle a question that they had around exploring adult’s perceptions of and attitude towards single use plastics.  The Plastic Citizen project was just one of several projects, within the University of Hull’s Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (ESPRC) funded Evolving a Circular Plastics Economy (ECPE) programme, which had the overall aim of tackling some of the key issues and challenges around the problems caused to the environment by excessive use and disposal of single-use plastic. The Plastic Citizen project aimed to do this specifically through examining the attitudes and approaches of young people to the issues relating to the circular plastics economy and by empowering them to undertake and share their own research using Citizen Inquiry methodologies. This transdisciplinary project brought together researchers from three different areas in the University of Hull (Education, Politics and Chemistry), along with external stakeholders such as community-based youth projects, schools and specialist education providers.

Continue reading