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Drama database

The drama section of the project is devoted to modern reception of Greek drama in Anglophone contexts. It documents performance as well as text and its database draws on primary evidence from programmes, annotated scripts, prompt books, interviews and theatre records as well as published and unpublished texts. Theatre and poetry performances in the original languages and in translation are included as well as versions, adaptations and more ‘distant’ relatives that draw on classical themes or myths.

The drama data base is designed so that it can be searched for the careers of individuals and theatre companies as well as for Greek and modern authors, plays, themes and reviews. The aim is to enable classical reception studies to address performance with the same degree of rigour and attention to the critical handling of evidence which is expected in textual studies and to develop ways of documenting performance that recognise its cross-disciplinary dimensions and the creative agency of the theatre practitioners, both ancient and modern. Documentation of the processes of performance creation also includes interviews with translators, directors and designers. A series of critical essays discuss the criteria involved in using interviews, theatre reviews and other primary sources. 

The initial stages of the drama research were supported by a Research Development Grant from the Open University. 

Database aims

The database aims to enable Reception studies to address issues of performance with the same degree of rigour and attention to evidence which is expected in textual studies and has been designed so that it can be searched for the careers of individuals and theatre companies as well as for Greek and modern authors, plays, themes and reviews. We hope that the database will prove useful. The original data collection (pre-1996) was researched by Dr. Ruth Hazel, as part of her doctoral thesis. The remainder has been contributed by many colleagues from a variety of backgrounds.

You may find it useful to print off the Database Guidance page prior to working with the database.

 

Acknowledgements

The current online interface was designed by Greg Parker of Solutions Factory, based on the design he used for the Archive of Performances of Greek and Roman Drama database, based at Oxford University.  We record our thanks to Amanda Wrigley of APGRD who assisted Greg with the design process. We would also like to record our thanks to David Wong of the Open University's Academic Computing Services department, for his expertise in ensuring the online delivery of the database.