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Dr Eleni Andreouli

Dr Eleni Andreouli

I am Senior Lecturer and Director of Research in the School of Psychology & Counselling. I am a social and political psychologist, with a particular interest in national identities and citizenship. My work integrates discursive and sociocultural psychological approaches with citizenship studies in order to develop a transdisciplinary understanding of citizenship with a focus on everyday practice. My research has examined constructions of the European Union and how citizens make sense of Brexit as an emerging cultural object. More recently, I have researched how citizenship is re-articulated in the context of Covid-19.

Three publications I wrote:

Andreouli, E. (2019). Social psychology and citizenship: a critical perspective. Social and Personality Psychology Compass. https://doi.org/10.1111/spc3.12432
Andreouli, E., Greenland, K., & Figgou, L. (2019). Lay discourses about Brexit and prejudice: ‘ideological creativity’ and its limits in Brexit debates. European Journal of Social Psychology. https://doi.org/10.1002/ejsp.2625
Andreouli, E., Kaposi, D., & Stenner, P. (2019). Brexit and emergent politics: in search of a social psychology. Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology. https://doi.org/10.1002/casp.2375

And one that inspired me:

Billig, M. (1995). Banal nationalism. London: Sage.

Dr Sebastian Bartos

Dr Sebastian Bartos

I am a Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University and I do research on the political psychology of sexuality. I am primarily interested in homophobia and how it changes, both within psychology and in society more broadly. My publications cover topics such as pride parades, equal-marriage referenda, and diversity training.

Three publications I wrote:

Bartoș, S.E., Noon, D.W., & Frost, D.M. (2020). Minority stress, campaign messages, and political engagement in the Australian Marriage Survey. Sexuality Research and Social Policy. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13178-020-00444-y
Bartoș, S.E., & Langdridge, D. (2019). LGBQ resilience: a thematic meta-synthesis of qualitative research. Psychology & Sexuality, 10, 234-247.
Bartoș, S.E., Berger, I., & Hegarty, P. (2014). Interventions to reduce sexual prejudice: A study-space analysis and meta-analytic review. Journal of Sex Research, 51, 363-382.

And one that inspired me:

Lewin, K. (1946) Action research and minority problems. Journal of Social Issues, 2(4): 34–46.

Dr Jovan Byford

Dr Jovan Byford

I am Senior Lecturer in Psychology in the School of Psychology & Counselling at The Open University. Although my background is in social psychology, my research these days is mainly historical. I am particularly interested in how public memory of historical events changes over time, and how, in recalling the past, people and societies negotiate contemporary concerns, manage their identities, and attend to political and ideological business of the present. My research mainly focuses on the context of the former Yugoslavia, the country where I happen to have been born and where I grew up. Most recently, I published the book Picturing Genocide in the Independent State of Croatia, which looks at the role which atrocity photographs played, and continue to play, in forging the public memory of the Second World War in the countries of the former Yugoslavia. I also have an enduring interest in conspiracy theories and antisemitism, two topics that, in my view, cannot be adequately understood without the coming together of psychology and history.

Three publications I wrote:

Byford, Jovan (2020). Picturing Genocide in the Independent State of Croatia: Atrocity Images and the Contested Memory of the Second World War in the Balkans. War, Culture and Society. Bloomsbury Academic.
Byford, Jovan (2011). Conspiracy Theories: A Critical Introduction. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
Byford, Jovan (2008). Denial and Repression of Antisemitism: Post-Communist Remembrance of the Serbian Bishop Nikolaj Velimirović. Budapest, Hungary: Central European University Press.

And one that inspired me:

I would recommend to anyone to read Primo Levi’s Holocaust memoir If this is a man. First published in 1947, this book offers a powerful reminder that greatest insights into the human condition do not necessarily come from academic writing, or ways of thinking. Levi, Primo (1979). If This is a Man/The Truce. London: Penguin.

Dr Rose Capdevila

Dr Rose Capdevila

I am a Senior Lecturer in the School of Psychology. My research focus is on social media and gendered spaces. This includes research from how young women make sense of themselves and curate their identity online through the use of selfies to mothering on and offline and practices such as ‘sharenting’. I take a critical feminist approach to my research with a theoretical focus on the construction and transgression of discursive boundaries around identity - in particular political and gender identities. Moreover, I am interested in the role and politics of methodology in psychology and how these impact on minoritary groups. Much of my research takes place with the Networking Families Research Group with CuSP member Dr Lisa Lazard. I am co-editor of the journal Feminism & Psychology and Chair of the Psychology of Women & Equalities Section (POWES) of the British Psychological Society.

Three publications I wrote:

Capdevila, R. & Lazard, L. (2021). The big picture: Using visual methods to explore online photo sharing and gender in digital space. In Reavey, P. (ed) A Handbook of Visual Methods in Psychology. London: Routledge.
Lazard, L., Capdevila, R., Dann, C., Locke, A. & Roper, A. (2019) Sharenting: Pride, affect and the day-to-day politics of digital mothering. Social & Personal Psychology Compass; e12443. DOI: 10.1111/spc3.12443
Capdevila, R. (2015) Negotiating health, mothering and ‘choice’. Psicologia della Salute, 1: 9-29. DOI: 10.3280/PDS2015-001002

And one that inspired me:

Haraway, D. (1991). Simians, cyborgs, and women: The reinvention of nature. Routledge.

Prof. Sarah Crafter

Prof. Sarah Crafter

I am a Professor in Cultural-Developmental Psychology. My research is broadly interested in young people’s and family migration experiences and how they impact on everyday lives. My research challenges traditional developmental psychological paradigms that view children’s maturation according to age-graded or ‘normative’ patterns of growth, often described as developmental transitions. Instead, I argue that developmental transitions, when reframed as a dynamic sociocultural process provide practitioners and the academy with enhanced understandings of the lives of vulnerable children, whose challenging life experiences mean they do not follow the ‘normal’ or ‘ideal’ transition to adulthood. My work mostly falls along two strands: i) a focus a child language brokers, who are children and young people who translate and interpret for family members following migration and ii) a focus on the care of separated child migrants as the navigate the asylum-welfare nexus. I am interested in the intersection between immigration regimes, care regimes and childhood. This area of research uniquely bridges theorisations of ‘non-normative’ childhoods, ‘care’ and ‘migration’ and in doing so, opens new ways of understanding the precarity of child migrant’s lives.

Three publications I wrote:

Crafter, S. & Iqbal, H. (2020) Drawing on the notion of the contact zone to explore the dialogical positionalities in ‘non-normative’ childhoods: How children who language broker manage conflict. Review of General Psychology, 24(1), 31-42.
Rosen, R., Crafter, S., & Meetoo, V. (online first). An absent presence: Separated child migrants’ caring practices and the fortified neoliberal state. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Crafter, S., Maunder, R and Soulsby, S (2019) Developmental transitions: exploring stability and change through the lifespan. Abingdon, Oxford: Routledge.

And one that inspired me:

Kessen, W. (1979). The American child and other cultural inventions. American Psychologist, 34(10), 815-820.

Alison Davies

Dr Alison Davies

I’m a Postgraduate Research Associate in the School of Psychology, providing academic and research support for academic staff. This means I get to be involved in a whole range of really interesting projects.
My own academic background lies in the field of critical social psychology. I am interested in discourses of health and illness and how these are implicated with identity. My research and publication focus has been around the meanings of ADHD for those individuals and families affected by the condition. A recent project I have been involved in looked at the life-span narratives of women with ADHD. I’m particularly interested in the way that diagnoses can be used as a transformational resource to understand past lives and troubled identities.
I have collaborated on projects with research teams from WELS. These projects have included an evaluation of the Spinal Injuries Association’s peer support and a current collaboration focusing on fathers’ relationships with their disabled children.
When not at the OU, I work as a (registered) therapist and supervisor within a local community charity. I’m trained in psychodynamic methods, but I would describe my work as integrative now. I am interested in the relationship between somatic expression and psychological distress and am about to begin training in somatic trauma therapy.

Three publications I wrote:

Stenner, P., O’Dell, L. & Davies, A. (2019). Adult women and ADHD: On the temporal dimensions of ADHD identities. Journal of the Theory Social Behaviour, 1–19. https://doi.org/10.1111/jtsb.12198
Horton-Salway, M. & Davies, A. (2018). The Discourses of ADHD: Perspectives on Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Palgrave Macmillan (UK)
Davies, A. and Horton-Salway, M. (2016). The Construction of Adult ADHD: Anna’s Story. In M. O’Reilly and N. Lester (Eds), The Palgrave Handbook of Adult Mental Health, (pp. 117-133). Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan..

And one that inspired me:

Iris Marion Young: Throwing like a girl: A phenomenology of feminine body comportment motility and spatiality

Prof. John Dixon

Prof. John Dixon

Having grown up in Northern Ireland and South Africa, I have a particular interest in the social psychology of intergroup conflict and inequality. I have contributed to three main areas. First, my research has explored the relationship between intergroup contact and social change, focusing particularly on how different forms of contact shape collective action to reduce inequality. Second, I have conducted research on the history, nature and limits of the concept of prejudice in psychology. Finally, I have a longstanding interest in human geography of intergroup relations, especially the relationship between place, identity, and boundary construction. In my most recent work, for instance, I have been exploring how and why everyday mobility practices may maintain segregation in historically divided cities. This work draws methodologically and conceptually on contributions from companion disciplines such as human geography, urban sociology, and Geographic Information Science.

Three publications I wrote:

Dixon, J., Tredoux, C., Davies, G., Huck, J., Hocking, B., Sturgeon, B., Whyatt, D., Jarman, N. & Bryan, D. (2020). Parallel lives: Intergroup contact, threat and the segregation of everyday activity spaces. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 118, 457-480. DOI: 10.1037/pspi0000191
Dixon, J. (2017). ‘Thinking ill of others without sufficient warrant’? Transcending the accuracy-inaccuracy dualism in prejudice and stereotyping research. British Journal of Social Psychology, 56, 4-27. The 2017 annual ‘landmark’ paper.
Dixon, J., Levine, M., Reicher, S. & Durrheim, K. (2012). Beyond prejudice: Are negative evaluations the problem and is getting us to like one another more the solution? Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 35, 411-425.

And one that inspired me:

Jackman, M.R. (1994). The velvet glove: Paternalism and conflict in gender, class, and race relations. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Anthony English

Anthony English

I am a final-year PhD student who joined the OU in 2018, as recipient of the Rachael Webb Political Psychology Studentship. I am a member of PDPC, the Public Dialogue Psychology Collaboratory (hyperlink to publicdialoguepsychologycolab.co.uk available in Feb) together with Dr. Kesi Mahendran and Sue Nieland. I entered higher education as a mature student in 2010 studying a BSc in Applied Psychology at Durham University. Since that time I have completed a PGCE in adult learning, and a MSc in Clinical & Forensic Psychology at Newcastle University. My academic field is political psychology and I am currently researching dialogical positions with a focus on sustaining dialogue among politically polarised interlocuters. The ontological and epistemological assumptions of this research focus on the dialogical self; specifically, positional exchanges, social representations, and chronotopic framing. Other studies involve exploring the difference in populist and citizen representations of home (2021), the public’s dialogical creations of home (2021), and the predictive value of moral foundations on prosocial behaviour.

Three publications I wrote:

English, A., and Mahendran, K. (2021) Sustaining Dialogue in Polarised Political Contexts: Moving beyond Shared-Identity to Dialogical Position Exchanges. Paper Presented at International Society of Theoretical Psychology’s 2019 Measured Lives conference. (available sometime in 2021).
Mahendran, K., English, A., and Nieland, S. (2021) No obvious home: the public’s dialogical creation of home during the third wave of decolonization. Special Issue Psychology of Global Crises – Human Arenas. (available early 2021).
Mahendran, K., English, A., and Nieland, S. (2021) Populism vs. the People: How citizen’s social representations of home destabilize national populism’s territorial vision. Journal of Theoretical Social Psychology. (available early 2021).

And one that inspired me:

James Martin The Meaning of the 21st Century. This revived my passion for learning and inspired me to consider pursing higher education as a mature student.

Dr Karen Hagan

Dr Karen Hagan

I am a Senior Lecturer and Staff Tutor in The Open University School of Psychology & Counselling, based in Northern Ireland. As a regional academic in a Devolved Nation, I mainly work on teaching delivery. The role also involves liaising with local external organisations and institutions. I am currently Chair of the Northern Ireland Branch of the British Psychological Society, a Committee Member for the Political Psychology Section of the British Psychological Society and a member of the local branch of Psychologists for Social Change. I am particularly excited to have recently taken up a part-time 2-year secondment opportunity as ‘Access, Participation and Success’ Academic Lead, within the Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Team of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. I am currently involved in research projects on bullying, coercion and manipulation; l Lived experiences of students with borderline personality disorders, mood disorders, autism and anxiety, and discourses in autism assessment and diagnosis.

Three publications I wrote:

Hagan, Karen. (2018). Discourses in Autism Assessment and Diagnosis. PhD thesis. The Open University.
Hagan, Karen. (2020) Bullying and Manipulation: Join the Resistance. https://www.open.edu/openlearn/health-sports-psychology/psychology/bullying-and-manipulation-join-the-resistance

And one that inspired me:

Schott, Robin. M. and Søndergaard, D. M. (eds) (2014) School Bullying: New Theories in Context. New York: Cambridge University Press

Dr David W Jones

Dr David W Jones

I have a long standing interest in mental health issues. My first ‘career job’ was as part of a research team studying the impact of the closure of the psychiatric asylums. My Phd was a study of the psychological impact of serious mental illness on families.
Through this early work I became dissatisfied with narrow range of methods traditionally associated with psychological research methods. It was at this point that I became interested in developing specifically psychosocial methods and since then I have sustained a broad interest in the development of psychosocial thinking for the insight it gives to understanding the relationship of the individual to the wider social group, My particular interests have been in understanding when that relationship appears to be problematic - notably, for example in the contexts of mental health issues and in terms of criminality.
I have also become increasingly interested in the importance of historical exploration as an important dimension of psychosocial understanding.
I am Joint Editor of the Journal of Psychosocial Studies, that has recently been adopted by Policy Press. I am a founding member and Treasurer of the Association for Psychosocial Studies

Three publications I wrote:

Jones, D.W. (2020) Understanding Criminal Behaviour: Psychosocial Approaches on Criminality to Violence. Abingdon: Routledge.
Jones, D.W. (2016). Disordered Personalities and Crime: An analysis of the history of moral insanity. Abingdon: Routledge.
Jones, D.W. (2002). Myths, Madness and the Family: The Impact of Mental Illness on Families. Basingstoke: Palgrave.

And one that inspired me:

Elias, N. (1939/1994). The Civilizing Process: Sociogenetic and Psychogenetic Investigations. Blackwell: Oxford. A remarkable and innovative study that tries to trace shifts in consciousness in western societies in the centuries following the middle ages. It links psychic change with the development of western states.

Dr David Kaposi

Dr David Kaposi

I am a Senior Lecturer at the School of Psychology and a psychotherapist accredited by the British Psychoanalytic Council. Originally trained as a social psychologist and with an interest in human meaning-making, my psychotherapeutic practice strongly influences my understanding of dynamics within and between people. Currently, the main empirical focus of my research concerns tape recordings of Stanley Milgram’s “Obedience to authority” experimental sessions; I am hoping that an analysis of the implicit, unacknowledged, un-conscious processes in these sessions can be further expanded into a psychosocial theory of violence which focuses on implicit processes. This project has recently been awarded with an ISRF Mid-Career Fellowship. Having coordinated the group as a new research formation within the School of Psychology, I currently act as PHeW Research Strand Lead.

Three publications I wrote:

Kaposi, D. (2020). The psychodynamic approach. In Moller, N., Vossler, A., Jones, D.W. & Kaposi, D (Eds). Understanding mental health and counselling. London: Sage.
Kaposi, D. (2020). Saving a victim from himself: The rhetoric of the learner’s presence and absence in the Milgram experiments. British Journal of Social Psychology, 59(4), 900-921. http://doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12369
Kaposi, D. (2020). Freud and sexuality. Psychology Review, 26(November), 22-23.

And one that inspired me:

Arendt, H. (1964). Eichmann in Jerusalem: A report on the banality of evil. New York: The Viking Press.

Professor Darren Langdridge

Professor Darren Langdridge

I am a Professor of Psychology within the School of Psychology & Counselling and also a UKCP accredited existential psychotherapist working in private practice. I have two strands to my research programme, one focused on health and the other on sexual cultures with both underpinned by an interest in developing and deploying qualitative methodologies and critical social theory. Recent health focused projects include: (i) work developing a methodology for the analysis of affect within public health intervention materials with a team led by Prof Flowers (Strathclyde Uni) examining anti-microbial resistance interventions; and (ii) the application of this same methodology on intervention materials designed to increase HIV testing for men who have sex with men with a team led by Prof McDaid (Glasgow Uni) and Prof Flowers. I have also recently completed a project on a novel sexual sub-culture known as ‘puppy play’ (with Dr Jamie Lawson, Bristol Uni) and I am currently finalising a major monograph on sexual citizenship.

Three publications I wrote:

Langdridge, D., Davis, M., Gozdzielewska, L., McParland, J., Williams, L., Mairi Young, M., Smith, F., MacDonald, J., Price, L. & Flowers, P. (2019). The effectiveness of interventions to increase antimicrobial stewardship: a visual affective analysis. British Journal of Health Psychology, 24, 66-87, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/bjhp.12339
Langdridge, D. & Lawson, J. (2019). The psychology of puppy play: a phenomenological investigation. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 48(7), 2201-2215. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10508-019-01476-1
Langdridge, D., Gabb, J. & Lawson, J. (2019). Art as a pathway to impact: an ‘affective’ evaluation. The Sociological Review, 67(3), 585-601. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0038026118822822

And one that inspired me:

Bech, H. (1997). When men meet: homosexuality and modernity. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Marianna Latif

Marianna Latif

I am a Staff Tutor in the School of Psychology & Counselling, with responsibility for the London region. My ongoing PhD work is on migrant parenting. The research is interview-based, using a social psychological and discourse analytic approach. I am interested in participants’ use of symbolic resources in their discursive work to present themselves and their parenting relationship positively, negotiating conflicts that derive from the migrant situation and also the cultural differences between life and family practices ‘there’ and ‘here’.

And one that inspired me:

Zittoun, T. (2006). Transitions: Development through symbolic resources. (J. Valsiner, Ed.). Greenwich, Connecticut: Information Age Publishing.

Dr Lisa Lazard

Dr Lisa Lazard

I am a Senior Lecturer in the School of Psychology & Counselling at The Open University and my research interests lie in the areas of social and feminist psychology. I mainly study gender and intersectional power dynamics and have done so in my research on sexual harassment dynamics. More recently, I have examined gender in digital cultures and have focused on women’s curation of self and relationships through posting photos on social media. I am particularly interested in the curation of parenting identities online and the phenomenon of ‘sharenting’ which refers to the criticism parents receive when ‘oversharing’ about their children and families on social media. My academic interests are the basis of my long-standing involvement in the Psychology of Women and Equalities Section of the British Psychological Society which has included, for example, serving as the Editor-in-Chief of the Psychology of Women Section Review.

Three publications I wrote:

Lazard, L. (2020). Sexual Harassment, psychology and feminism: #MeToo, victim politics and predators in neoliberal times. Palgrave MacMillian.
Lazard, L. & Capdevila, R. (2020). She's so vain? A Q study of selfies and the curation of an online self. New media & Society, DOI: 10.1177/1461444820919335.
Lazard, L., Capdevila, R., Dann, C., Locke, A and Roper, S. (2019). Sharenting: Pride, affect and the day to day politics of digital mothering. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 13(4), DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/spc3.12443.

And one that inspired me:

Gavey, N. (2005). Just sex? The cultural scaffolding of rape. Routledge.

Dr Jenny Lynden

Dr Jenny Lynden

I am a Staff Tutor in the School of Psychology & Counselling, Full Member of the British Psychological Society’s Division of Health Psychology and a Coaching Psychologist. I use an integrative model of coaching to support clients achieve their goals particularly focussing on enhancing their health and wellbeing. I trained at the Centre for Coaching, and the Tavistock and Portman NHS Trust in London. My main research interests involve using discursive psychology to understand what makes ‘helping conversations’ effective. This involves a microlevel analysis of the linguistic and paralinguistic features of communication. I am particularly interested in how practitioners manage epistemic stance or knowledge rights through question and answer sequences, and how this can lead to collaboration and partnership working with their clients.

Three publications I wrote:

Lynden, J., Hollands, T., & Ogden, J. (2020). A farrier making every contact count: a microlevel analysis of farrier-client interaction for partnership working in managing a horse with laminitis. Journal of Equine Veterinary Science, 102924. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jevs.2020.102924
Dippold, D., Lynden, J., Shrubsall, R., & Ingram, R. (2020). A turn to language: How interactional sociolinguistics informs the redesign of prompt: response chatbot turns. Discourse, Context & Media, 37, 100432. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dcm.2020.100432
Lynden J. & Avery, R. E. (2016). Workplace telephone coaching conversations: a unique institutional practice as revealed through interpretive and empiricist multi-method approaches, Coaching: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice, 9:1, 5-23, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/17521882.2015.1105835

And one that inspired me:

Harré, R., & Stearns, P. N. (Eds.). (1995). Discursive psychology in practice. London: Sage.

Dr Kesi Mahendran

Dr Kesi Mahendran

I am a social and political psychologist. I am a member of PDPC, the Public Dialogue Psychology Collaboratory (hyperlink to publicdialoguepsychologycolab.co.uk available in Feb) together with Anthony English and Sue Nieland. I am the Chair-Elect of the British Psychology Society Political Psychology Section - a new section which was founded, together with colleagues, in 2019. I generally work collaboratively on cross-European projects examining public dialogue on migration, citizenship, integration and belonging. My aim is to support dialogue between citizens and their governments on vexed political question where consensus is not easily arrived at. Within PDPC we are developing dialogical methods which serve to de-polarize public opinion towards public dialogue. In my current study, in England, Scotland and Sweden, I am looking at everyday understandings of international relations using an interactive worldview-mapping tool which enables citizens to ‘rule the world’.

Three publications I wrote:

Mahendran, K., English, A., Nieland, S. (2021) Populism vs. the People: How citizen’s social representations of home destabilize national populism’s territorial vision. Journal of Theoretical Social Psychology (available early 2021).
Mahendran, K., Magnusson, N., Howarth, C & Scuzzarello, S. (2019) Reification and the Refugee: using a counterposing dialogical analysis to unlock a frozen category. Journal of Social and Political Psychology, 7(1) (pp. 577-597)
Mahendran, K., Jackson, I., & Kapoor, A. (2015) Public Narratives Of European Citizenship: The Dialogical Citizen In The European Public Sphere. (2015-09-10) In: Korkut, Umut; Mahendran, Kesi; Buckan-Knapp, Gregg and Cox, Robert Henry eds. Discursive Governance in Politics, Policy and the Public Sphere (pp. 147-162). ISBN: 9781137495778 | Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan | Published: Basingstoke

And one that inspired me:

Bakhtin, M. (2019). Mikhail Bakhtin: The Duvakin Interviews, 1973. Rutgers University Press, USA.

Dr Jean McAvoy

Dr Jean McAvoy

I am the Head of School for the School of Psychology & Counselling. My research interests are in the social construction of subjectivities, identities and moral orders. I work within a framework of critical social psychology. I am interested in what resources people have for making sense of their lives, how this is shaped within particular social and cultural practices. My particular interests lie in what understandings of selves are formed, in the kinds of moralities that are produced, and how concepts of rights and wrongs are established, consolidated, or challenged. I am interested in what gets accomplished at personal, interpersonal and institutional levels when concepts such as good or bad, successful or failing, legitimacy, deficiency and deviancy are applied to people and behaviour. Methodologically I work with a broad discourse analytic approach that allows epistemological investigations of how knowledge and understanding is worked up at a local and more macro levels, and explorations of the ontology of subjectivity and relationality and the nature of interiority and experience.

Three publications I wrote:

Lazard, L. and McAvoy, J. (2018). Doing reflexivity in psychological research - What's the point? What's the practice? Qualitative Research in Psychology.
McAvoy, J. (2016). Discursive psychology and the production of identity in language practices. In: Preece, Siân ed. The Routledge Handbook of Language and Identity. (pp. 98-112) Abingdon: Routledge.
McAvoy, J. (2015) From ideology to feeling: discourse, emotion and an analytic synthesis. Qualitative Research in Psychology, 12(1) (pp. 22-33)

And one that inspired me:

Wetherell, M. (2012). Affect and emotion: a new social science understanding, Sage, London.

Dr Laura McGrath

Dr Laura McGrath

I am a Lecturer in Psychosocial Mental Health, from the School of Psychology & Counselling. My research has primarily looked at the role of the environment in experiences of mental distress, care and recovery. I mainly take a qualitative approach to research, using a variety of visual and verbal methodologies to explore experiences of space, place and mental distress. I am interested in community and non-clinical approaches to distress, care and recovery and have worked in partnership with services and projects on evaluations in these areas. My work is interdisciplinary, drawing on social, community and critical psychology, as well as human geography and social theory, to explore psychosocial and material aspects of mental health experiences.

Three publications I wrote:

Muir, J., McGrath, L. (2018) Life lines: Loss, loneliness and expanding meshworks with an urban Walk and Talk group, Health & Place, 53, 164-172.
McGrath, L., Reavey, P. (2018). Handbook of Mental Health and Space: Community and Clinical Applications. London: Routledge.
McGrath, L., Reavey, P. (2015). Seeking fluid possibility and solid ground: Space and movement in mental health service users' experiences of ‘crisis’, Social Science & Medicine, 128, 115-125.

And one that inspired me:

Goffman, E. (1961). Asylums: Essays on the condition of the social situation of mental patients and other inmates. London: Vintage Books.

Dr Johanna Motzkau

Dr Johanna Motzkau

I am a Senior Lecturer in the School of Psychology & Counselling. I have a background in Philosophy, German critical psychology, child and forensic psychology, and I trained in the credibility assessment of witnesses for courts in Germany. Taking a critical discursive approach, I am interested in theoretical and methodological issues in psychology, and in issues around gender, sexual violence, children’s rights, and the interaction of psychology and law. My research has compared child witness practice in Germany and the UK, and explored the psychological concepts of suggestibility and memory vis a vis concepts of childhood. More recently I have been exploring and theorizing the concept of listening within and beyond psychology, drawing on a process theoretical framework. I have developed the analytical concept of ‘cultures of listening’ and the method of ‘dark listening’ to help examine and transform troubled listening in child protection practice.

Three publications I wrote:

Motzkau, J. F., Clinch, M. (2017). Managing suspended transition in medicine and law: liminal hotspots as resources for change. Theory & Psychology. 27(2), 270–289
Motzkau, J.F. (2010). Speaking up against justice: credibility, suggestibility and children’s Memory on Trial. In: P. Reavey & J. Haaken (Eds.), Memory matters. London: Psychology Press.
Motzkau, J.F. (2009). Exploring the transdisciplinary trajectory of suggestibility. Subjectivity. Vol 27, 172-194.

And one that inspired me:

Holzkamp, K. (1985). Die Grundlegung der Psychologie. Berlin: Campus.

Sue Nieland

Sue Nieland

I am a second year PhD student and a Staff Tutor in the School of Psychology & Counselling and have worked as an Associate Lecturer with The Open University for 15 years. I am a member of PDPC, the Public Dialogue Psychology Collaboratory (hyperlink to publicdialoguepsychologycolab.co.uk available in Feb) together with Dr. Kesi Mahendran and Anthony English. My academic interests have always been located in qualitative methods and discourse, originally in education looking at children’s talk as they completed science and technology tasks. More recently, I undertook an MA focusing on political philosophy and the Arab Spring which led to the movement to my current academic field in political psychology. I am researching the political decision-making of the Silent Generation, older citizens born between 1927 and 1946, with a focus on how the dialogical older citizen makes political decisions over their lifetimes and how these decisions are influenced in elections and referenda. I am particularly interested in older citizens’ views of the UK’s relationship with Europe and the role of nostalgic political rhetoric and the populists’ use of war metaphors on decision-making.

Three publications I wrote:

Nieland, S. (2020) They’re Killing my Participants, available at: https://oupsychology.wordpress.com/2020/06/18/theyre-killing-my-participants/
Mahendran, K., English, A., and Nieland, S. (2021) No obvious home: the public’s dialogical creation of home during the third wave of decolonization. Special Issue Psychology of Global Crises – Human Arenas. (available early 2021).
Mahendran, K., English, A., and Nieland, S. (2021) Populism vs. the People: How citizen’s social representations of home destabilize national populism’s territorial vision. Journal of Theoretical Social Psychology. (available early 2021).

And one that inspired me:

Although the merging of politics and psychology was the key to unlocking the PhD for me, it was Tania Zittoun’s work on the dialogical approach and its role in ageing, age loops and temporal orientation that has really inspired me in the paper below: Zittoun, T. (2014) Three dimensions of dialogical movement, New Ideas in Psychology, 32, pp. 99-106.

Dr Sandra Obradovic

Dr Sandra Obradovic

I am a social and political psychologist interested in understanding how psychosocial dynamics of identity, power and history shape intergroup relations in domestic and international contexts. One stand of research explores how experiences of recognition and misrecognition impact belonging and well-being among both minorities and majorities. Another strand focuses on the psychological use of history (through collective memories, nostalgia and constructions of collective continuity/discontinuity) and how it becomes used to justify, or challenge, present socio-political arrangements. I am also an Associate Researcher of the Electoral Psychology Observatory (LSE) where I conduct research on how divisive elections impact intergroup relations.

Three publications I wrote:

Obradović, S. & Bowe, M. (2020) The nation in context: How intergroup relations shape the discursive construction of identity continuity and discontinuity. British Journal of Social Psychology.
Obradović, S., Power, S.& Sheehy-Skeffington, J. (2020). Understanding the psychological appeal of populism. Current Opinion in Psychology.
Obradović, S. & Sheehy-Skeffington, J. (2020). Power, identity, and belonging: A mixed-methods study of the processes shaping perceptions of EU integration in a prospective member state. European Journal of Social Psychology.

And one that inspired me:

Reicher, S., & Hopkins, N. (2000). Self and nation. Sage.

Prof. Paul Stenner

Prof. Paul Stenner

I am Professor of Social Psychology at The Open University and Co-Director of the School’s new centre. For me, CuSP is about keeping social psychology fresh and alive to new theories, methods and practices, and keeping it responsive to the real social and personal issues people are facing today. I believe that social psychology is not simply about supplying the objective facts about human nature that will help society to shape the conduct of its citizens. Psychology is more political and ethical than that, and it is pretty important in today's culture, reflecting back to us the kinds of beings we think we are. CusP is about affirming that we are cultural beings who make sense of ourselves using the ever-refreshed heritage of our cultural resources.

Three publications I wrote:

Stenner, P (2017) Liminality and Experience: A transdisciplinarity approach to the Psychosocial. London: Palgrave. (Shortlisted for BPS book prize, 2019).
Greco, M. and Stenner, P (2017) From paradox to pattern shift: Conceptualising liminal hotspots and their affective dynamics. Theory and Psychology, 27(2): 147-166.
Stenner, P and Zittoun, T (2020) On taking a leap of faith. Art, Imagination and liminal experiences. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology. 40(4), 240–263. https://doi.org/10.1037/teo0000148

And one that inspired me:

Tania Zittoun and Alex Gillespie (2015) Integrating experiences: Body and mind moving between contexts. This was the Niels Bohr Professorship Lecture in Cultural Psychology.

Prof. Stephanie Taylor

Prof. Stephanie Taylor

I am Professor of Social Psychology. My research investigates the new identities attached to contemporary contexts, and the associated subjectivities or senses of self which are shaped by public discourses, ‘commonsense’ knowledge, identifications and contemporary life practices, with a particular focus on gendered subjectivities. My recent publications have centred on creativity and the conflicts that are experienced around a contemporary identification as a creative practitioner or creative worker. Previous research explored women’s identifications in relation to place. I have also written extensively on qualitative methodologies, including critical discursive and narrative approaches. I am co-editor of several collections of recent research on the global sector of the cultural and creative industries, and I co-edit the Palgrave series Creative Working Lives. I am co-convenor of the Culture and Social Psychology research strand in the centre.

Three publications I wrote:

Taylor, S. (2019). A practitioner concept of contemporary creativity. Social Psychology Quarterly, 82(4), 453-472.
Taylor, S. (2017). 'Psychosocial research' in Gough, B. The Palgrave Handbook of Critical Social Psychology Palgrave Macmillan. pp.225-242.
Taylor, S. (2015). Discursive and psychosocial? Theorising a complex contemporary subject. Qualitative Research in Psychology 12(1), 8- 21.

And one that inspired me:

Rose, N. (1996). Inventing Our Selves: Psychology, Power and Personhood. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.