Skip to content

Toggle service links

You are here

  1. Home
  2. R&E Group 4: Monday 15th March, 10:10-11:10

R&E Group 4: Monday 15th March, 10:10-11:10

  1. 1.7 Diversifying the future of veterinary science
  2. 1.8 U-Law BAME Advocate Scheme
  3. 1.9 Reimagining the curricula in higher education: Increasing students’ interaction with teachers and interest through culturally sensitive curricula
  4. 1.10 The impact of using OUAnalyse on award gap in 3 STEM modules in 2019

1.7 Diversifying the future of veterinary science 

Lavinia Economu, Animal Aspirations and Dr Grace MacKintosh-Sim and Kate Oliver, Outreach Team, Royal Veterinary College 

Click to download 1.7 Diversifying the future of veterinary science (.pptx)

Watch the recorded session

Abstract

Veterinary and allied professionals are currently overwhelmingly white and from affluent socio-economic backgrounds (RCVS 2019). The Royal Veterinary College’s Widening Participation programmes, and the student-led Animal Aspirations project, work to increase the diversity of the sector. With a range of targeted and sustained interventions, these programmes provide underrepresented young people with role models, resources, and the support they need to reach their goals.  

In this session, Lavinia Economu of Animal Aspirations, along with Grace MacKintosh-Sim and Kate Oliver from the RVC’s Outreach team, will explore the challenges of these programmes, how they have changed in response to the events of 2020, and practical tips to support diversity in your area. 

Back to top


1.8 U-Law BAME Advocate Scheme – Podcast 

David Taylor and Fatmata Daramy with, Teagan Williams (Student BAME Advocate)  University of Law 

Click to download 1.8 U-Law BAME Advocate Scheme – Podcast (.pptx)

Watch the recorded session

Abstract

The BAME Advocate scheme at the University of Law aims to support and empower Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic students. It provides BAME students with a paid opportunity to work alongside the university in addressing key issues such as the degree attainment gap, whilst also developing their own skills and fostering a sense of community.  

The scheme involves advocates taking on different projects. The presentation will be presented by student BAME Advocates and is entitled “ULaw BAME Advocate Scheme - Podcast”. It will focus on one of our projects, a podcast on employability within the legal sector, designed and executed by advocates. We hope that delegates will leave the conference with an understanding of what a huge impact giving BAME students a voice can have on an educational institution.  

Back to top


1.9 Reimagining the curricula in higher education: Increasing students’ interaction with teachers and interest through culturally sensitive curricula

Dave S.P. Thomas and Prof Kathleen M. Quinlan, Centre for the Study of Higher Education, University of Kent 

Click to download 1.9 Reimagining the curricula in higher education: Increasing students’ interaction with teachers and interest through culturally sensitive curricula (.pptx)

Watch the recorded session

Abstract

Persistent racial equality gaps exist in HE.  Positive interactions with teachers and interest are both associated with higher attainment (Jansen, Lüdtke, & Schroeders, 2016; Kuh & Hu, 2011), yet BAME/White gaps exist on these two engagement variables (Lundberg & Schreiner, 2004; Quinlan, 2004).  We traced these “engagement gaps” back to the lack of culturally sensitive curricula, suggesting that reforming curricula may help close both engagement and attainment gaps (Museus, 2014). Adopting a ‘race-focused’ approach (DeCuir-Gunby & Schutz, 2014) we investigated: 1) the extent to which students, particularly Black, Asian, and Minority Ethnic (BAME) students, perceive their curriculum as culturally sensitive; and 2) the relationship between cultural sensitivity in curricula and students’ engagement, defined as their academic interactions with teachers and their interest in the subject. To answer these questions, we developed a new set of Culturally Sensitive Curriculum Scales which make an important conceptual and methodological contribution to research.  

Back to top


1.10 The impact of using OUAnalyse on award gap in 3 STEM modules in 2019

Martin Hlosta, Miriam Fernandez, Christothea Herodoutou and Vaclav BayerThe Open University

Click to download 1.10 The impact of using OUAnalyse on award gap in 3 STEM modules in 2019 (.pptx)

Watch the recorded session

Abstract

In this work, we investigate the degree-awarding gap at the Open University by studying the impact of OUAnalyse, a Predictive Learning Analytics system, when applying it to three modules in 2019 with over 1,500 students. 22 tutors used the system to obtain predictions of which students were at risk of failing, which were followed by interventions to support these students. Our results show that BAME students in the intervention group, i.e. where tutors were using OUAnalyse, had 9% higher pass rates than BAME students in the comparison group and decreasing the module pass gap. This suggests that similar systems can play a significant role towards closing the degree-awarding gap.

Back to top


Further information

 

Day by day programme

Presentations and resources