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the experience of reading in Britain, from 1450 to 1945...

Reading Experience Database UK Historical image of readers
 
 
 
 

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Francis Lathom : Midnight Bell, a German Story, Founded on Incidents in Real Life

'My father is now reading the Midnight Bell, which he has got from the library, and mother sitting by the fire.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: George Austen      Print: Book

  

Montalembert : journals of Montalembert

'Montalembert, it appears, kept a journal from his twelfth year to the end of his life, and I am tantalised with the sight of these volumes, which Madame de M. reads to me for a couple of hours in the afternoon.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Madame de Montalembert      Manuscript: Codex

  

Charlotte Smith : [novels]

'Austen read especially novels by women, including Mary Brunton, Frances and Sarah Harriet Burney, Maria Edgeworth, Charlotte Lennox, Lady Morgan, Ann Radcliffe, Regina Maria Roche, Charlotte Smith, Jane West, Laetitia-Matilda Hawkins and Hannah More. She also, apparently, read the fiction of the Lady's Magazine, deriving names, Willoughby, Brandon, Knightley, from it, but correcting its "monological" discourse'.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Jane Austen      Print: Book

  

Hannah More : Coelebs in Search of a Wife

'Austen read especially novels by women, including Mary Brunton, Frances and Sarah Harriet Burney, Maria Edgeworth, Charlotte Lennox, Lady Morgan, Ann Radcliffe, Regina Maria Roche, Charlotte Smith, Jane West, Laetitia-Matilda Hawkins and Hannah More. She also, apparently, read the fiction of the Lady's Magazine, deriving names, Willoughby, Brandon, Knightley, from it, but correcting its "monological" discourse'.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Jane Austen      Print: Book

  

Tobias Smollett : Peregrine Pickle

'Dr Delany read his wife an eclectic range of books from Eusebius' "Life of Constantine the Great" to "Peregrine Pickle".'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Patrick Delany      Print: Book

  

Alan Ramsay : The Gentle Shepherd

'Susan Sibbald knew Scottish shepherd Wully Carruthers who was a fellow-subscriber to the circulating library at Melrose, but while she borrowed Ann Radcliffe, he read "Ancient and Modern History", though he did sometimes read a "novel or nonsense buke", like "Sir Charles Grandison". He had also read Alan Ramsay's "The Gentle Shepherd", and contrasted it ironically with the life of a real shepherd.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Wully Carruthers      Print: Book

  

Anne Plumptre : [novels]

'Princess Charlotte wrote of reading as a "great passion"; in a poignant attempt to construct bourgeois domestic intimacy in the dysfunctional household of the divorced Prince Regent she discussed and exchanged books with her friend Margaret Mercer Elphinstone, including memoirs and recent history, Byron's poems, and novels including Gothic fiction and works by Anne Plumptre and Jane Austen. (The perceptive Charlotte especially enjoyed "Sense and Sensibility" because she discerned in herself"the same imprudence" as Marianne's).'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Princess Charlotte      Print: Book

  

Mary Wortley Montagu : [Letters]

'Weeton's reading becomes important in communication with friends, but also a point of conflict: when she visits her brother and his wife, they complain that she spends all her time reading, though she insists that she read very little ("only... Gil Blas, now and then a newspaper, two or three of Lady M. W. Montagu's letters, and few pages in a magazine'), and only because her hosts rose so late. Since her literacy is important as a sign of status, she repeatedly presents herself not as a reader of low status texts like novels but of travels, education works, memoirs and letters, including Boswell's "Tour of the Hebrides", the Travels of Mungo Park, and Mme de Genlis' work. She approves some novels, like Hamilton's "The Cottagers of Glenburnie", but generally finds them a "dangerous, facinating kind of amusement" which "destroy all relish for useful, instructive studies'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Ellen Weeton      Print: Book

  

Elizabeth Hamilton : The Cottagers of Glenburnie

'Weeton's reading becomes important in communication with friends, but also a point of conflict: when she visits her brother and his wife, they complain that she spends all her time reading, though she insists that she read very little ("only... Gil Blas, now and then a newspaper, two or three of Lady M. W. Montagu's letters, and few pages in a magazine'), and only because her hosts rose so late. Since her literacy is important as a sign of status, she repeatedly presents herself not as a reader of low status texts like novels but of travels, education works, memoirs and letters, including Boswell's "Tour of the Hebrides", the Travels of Mungo Park, and Mme de Genlis' work. She approves some novels, like Hamilton's "The Cottagers of Glenburnie", but generally finds them a "dangerous, facinating kind of amusement" which "destroy all relish for useful, instructive studies'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Ellen Weeton      Print: Book

  

Walter de la Mare : [five poems]

'Yesterday my Elizabeth and I went to the most remarkable poets' Reading I have ever attended. It was held at Lord Byron's beautiful house in Piccadilly... I was moved by Mr de la Mare reading five poems of great beauty. Elizabeth was thrilled at seeing for the first time W.H. Davies, a strange tiny poet. He read "Love's Silent Hour" and three others. Hilary [Hilaire Belloc] read "The Poor of London" and "the Dons". He got a big reception'.

Unknown
Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Walter de la Mare      

  

Homer : The Iliad

'Growing up in extreme poverty in East London, Crooks spent 2d. on a secondhand "Iliad" and was dazzled: "What a revelation it was to me. Pictures of romance and beauty I had never dreamed of suddenly opened up before my eyes. I was transported from the East End to an enchanted land. It was a rare luxury for a working lad like me just home from work to find myself suddenly among the heroes and nymphs of ancient Greece".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Will Crooks      Print: Book

  

John Milton : 

'Read in Milton: his account of his blindness is very pathetic & I am always affected to tears'. Makes reference to 'Paradise Lost and 'regaind' "'Comus' & 'Allegro' & 'Penserose' are those which I take up most often"Quotes from 'Comus' ll.291-3.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Clare      Print: Book

  

Tobias Smollett : Roderick Random

I Read the travels of Roderick Random, who had been into different Quarters and he Exposed the severaty of the Captains over the Men, Esspeatialy the Sick, in a Most Shocking Manner, Which I believe in a great Measure to be true.

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Yeoman      

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

'If Clynes needed a second lesson in the subversive power of print, it came when his foreman nearly sacked him for sneaking a look at "Paradise Lost" during a work break at the mill.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: J.R. Clynes      Print: Book

  

Tobias Smollett : Roderick Random

Read the Second Part of Mr. Roderick Random

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Yeoman      

  

Hannah More : The Shepherd of Salisbury Plain

'Their Contents were Chiefly to perswade poor people to be satisfied in their situation an not to murmur at the dispensations of providence... those kinds of books were often put into my hands in a dictatorial way in order to convince me of my errors for instance there was [Hannah More's] the Shepherd of Salisbury Plain... the Farmers fireside and the discontented Pendulum and many others which drove me almost into despair for I could see their design'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Mayett      Print: Book

  

Robert Bloomfield : The Farmers Boy

'Sufferings of the post-horse... from Bloomfields 'the Farmers Boy'...Poplar 7th May 1832. T.W.M.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: T.W.M.      

  

James Montgomery : Evening

'Evening [transcription of poem] James Montgomery. Weedon Nov 11th 1836.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Weedon      

  

James Montgomery : The West Indies

From the 'West Indies' a Poem by Montgomery.Part 2 Page 22 'In These romantic regions[...] From the same, Part 3 'There is a land[...] From the Same part 3. Page 35 'And is the negro outlaw from his birth [...] From the same, part 3rd. Page 40.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Warburton      

  

Thomas Moore : The Song Of Music

Transcription of poem as 'The Song of Music'. 'Moore'.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Thomas Moore : 'The Fickleness of Love'

'The Fickleness of Love'. 'Moore'. [Transcription of poem].

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Thomas Moore : A Reflection at Sea

'A Reflection at Sea'. 'Moore'. [Transcription of poem].

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Thomas Moore : Weep Not for Those

'Weep not for Those'. 'Moore'. [Transcription of poem].

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Thomas Moore : Stanzas

'Stanzas'. 'Moore'. [Transcription of poem]'Go, let me weep there's bliss in tears /...'.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Thomas Moore : Perpetual Adoration

'Perpetual Adoration'. 'Moore'. [Transcription of poem]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Thomas Moore : The Inspiration of Love

'The Inspiartion of Love'. 'Moore'.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Thomas Moore : The Meeting of the Waters

'The Meeting of the Waters'. 'Moore'.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Thomas Moore : The Tear

'The Tear / Moore' [transcription of text].

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Thomas Moore : The Wintery Smile of Sorrow

'The Wintery smile of Sorrow / Moore' [transcription of text].

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Thomas Campbell : Hohenlinden

transcript of the poem headed 'battle of hohenlinden / campbell'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Thomas Campbell : The dirge of wallace

transcript of the poem headed 'battle of hohenlinden / campbell'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Thomas Campbell : Gertrude of Wyoming; a Pennsylvanian Tale

'death scene in gertrude of wyoming/ campbell'; there is also a footnote that gives the context of the scene in the tale.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

James Montgomery : Friendship, love and truth

'friendship, love & truth / montgomery'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

James Montgomery : Stanzas, Addressed to a friend on the birth of his first child

'stanzas. addressed to a friend on the birth of his first child. / montgomery'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

James Montgomery : Poet's address to twilight

'poet's address to twilight / montgomery'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Felicia Dorothea Hemans : Coeur De Lion At The Bier Of His Father

'coeurde lion at the bier of his father / new monthly magazine' [includes prose note] [transcription of poem]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Miss Elizabeth Smith : Fragments of prose and verse: by a young lady

'happiness is a very common plant...' 'e. smith's fragments' 'greenock'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elisabeth or Eliza Duncan      

  

Miss Elizabeth Smith : Fragments of prose and verse: by a young lady

'the christain life may be compared...' 'e. smith's fragments'. followed by extract ascribed to 'hannah more' 'those who are rendered unhappy by frivolous troubles seek comfort in frivolous enjoyments...'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elisabeth or Eliza Duncan      

  

Miss Elizabeth Smith : Fragments of prose and verse: by a young lady

'the cause of all sin...' 'e.smith's fragments'. signed 'e.d.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elisabeth or Eliza Duncan      

  

James Montgomery : The world before the flood; a poem in ten cantos

'far less shall earth now hastening to decay...' 'world before the flood' 'isle of man June 15th 31'.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elisabeth or Eliza Duncan      

  

Felix MacDonogh : The Hermit in London; or Sketches in English Manne

'Highland Hospitality' 'I once resolved to leave London for a little time [...]' 'Hermit in London'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: E.E.R.      Print: Book

  

Callimachus : unknown

'I have cast up my reading account, and brought it to the end of the year 1835. [?] During the last thirteen months I have read Aeschylus twice; Sophocles twice; Euripides once; Pindar twice; Callimachus; Apollonius Rhodius; Quintus Calaber; Theocritus twice; Herodotus; Thucydides; almost all Xenophon?s works; almost all Plato; Aristotle?s Politics, and a good deal of his Organon, besides dipping elsewhere in him; the whole of Plutarch?s Lives; about half of Lucian; two or three books of Athenaeus; Plautus twice; Terence twice; Lucretius twice; Catullus; Tibullus; Propertius; Lucan; Statius; Silius Italicus; Livy; Velleius Paterculus; Sallust; Caesar; and, lastly, Cicero. I have, indeed, still a little of Cicero left; but I shall finish him in a few days. I am now deep in Aristophanes and Lucian.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Monk : Biography of Richard Bentley

'Macaulay began with the frontispiece, if the book possessed one. "Said to be very like, and certainly full of the character. Energy, acuteness, tyranny, and audacity in every line of the face." Those words are writen above the portrait of Richard Bentley, in Bishop Monk's biography of that famous writer.'

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Thomas Campbell : The Last Man

'The Last Man by T. Campbell esq' [transcribes text] 'All worldly shapes shall melt in gloom...' Signed 'Fanny'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Dugdale      

  

F. D. Hemans : The Graves of a Household

'Graves of a Household' [transcript of text]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Emma Bowly      

  

Robert Hartley Cromek : Remains of Nithsdale and Galloway Song: with histo

'My Ain Fire Side' 'O I hae seen great ones...'[transcript of text] 'from the Nithsdale and Galloway Songs'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Emma Bowly      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Sonnet XIX When I consider how my light is spent

'Milton's Sonnet on his Blindness / 'When I consider how my light is spent...'[transcript of text]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Emma Bowly      

  

F.D. Hemans : The Homes of England

'The Homes of England' [transcribes text] 'Mrs Hemans'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Augusta Browne      

  

F.D. Hemans : Evening Prayer at a Girl's School

'Mrs Hemans. Evening Prayer at a girls school' [transcribes text]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Augusta Browne      

  

F.D. Hemans : The Wings of the Dove

'The Wings of the Dove. Mrs Hemans' [transcribes text]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Augusta Browne      

  

Rev. John Moultrie : Forget Thee?

'"Forget Thee?" By the Rev John Moultrie [transcript of poem].

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Felicia Dorothea Hemans : Fairy Favours

'Fairy Favours' [transcript of poem] 'Mrs Hemans'.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Groom      

  

Thomas James Mathias : The Pursuits of Literature; A Satirical Poem

Engaged in a 2nd perusal of the Pursuits of Literature and the Monthly Magazine

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: I.G.      Print: Book

  

Homer : The Iliad

In Lincoln, I now took up the Memorabilia of Xenophon, ran through the odes of Anacreon, and then commenced the Iliad. I worked hard at Greek.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Cooper      Print: Book

  

Moliere : Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme

"Under his instruction - while we read together part of Voltaire's 'Charles the Twelfth' and Moliere's 'Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme' - I caught hold of such good French pronunciation as would have enabled me soon to converse very pleasantly in the language, could I have found a companion."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Cooper      Print: Book

  

Samuel Maunder : The Treasury of Geography

I am reading "Maunders Treasury of Geography" a very entertaining work.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

Charles Tomlinson : Introduction to the Study of Natural Philosophy

"I have been reading lately "Natural Philosophy" by Tomlinson and Sir John Herschel, and am now reading the "Chemistry of Creation" by Dr Ellis."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

Charles and Mary Lamb : 

'Our parents had accumulated a large number of books, which we were allowed to browse in as much as we liked.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Vivian (Molly) Hughes      Print: Book

  

Samuel Maunder : The Treasury of Geography

I have been reading lately "Maunders Geography" and working a little at "Thompson's Natural Philosophy["]

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

Benjamin Thompson : Philosophical Papers: being a collection of memoir

I have been reading lately "Maunders Geography" and working a little at "Thompson's Natural Philosophy["]

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

Andrew Michael Ramsay : Travels of Cyrus

Mary read to me a little before dinner, (which she does tolerable); 'Cyrus' a Romance. I wound silk.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Stancliff      Print: Book

  

Andrew Michael Ramsay : ['Cyrus'] OR Travels of Cyrus

Lay till near 11. Mary read 'cyrus', I winding silk.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Stancliff      Print: Book

  

Charles Beckingham : The Life of Mr Richard Savage

Supper alone. Read life of Mr Savage.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

(Sir) John Denham : The Sophy OR Poems and Translations

Sup'd alone. Read 'The Sophy', a play of Sir J Deham's.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

John Sturmy : Sesostris: Or, Royalty in Disguise. A Tragedy.

Read 'Sesostris, a new Tragydy'; a so-so one.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Andrew Michael Ramsay : The Travels of Cyrus

Read 'The travells of Cyrus' after supper.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Andrew Michael Ramsay : The Travels of Cyrus

Home past 9. Supper alone, Read 'Cyrus', Bed 12.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Andrew Michael Ramsay : The Travels of Cyrus

Rise at 10. Mary read 'Cyrus'. Knited [knitted] till 7.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Stancliff      Print: Book

  

Andrew Michael Ramsay : The Travels of Cyrus

Took Phisick. Rise at 10. Mary read Cyrus.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Stancliff      Print: Book

  

Andrew Michael Ramsay : The Travels of Cyrus

Took phisick. Mary read Cyrus.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Stancliff      Print: Book

  

Madame de Gomez : La Belle Assemblee: or, The Adventures of Six Days

Read 'The Adventures of Six Days'. 1 hour. Bed 11.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Madame de Gomez : La Belle Assemblee: or, The Adventures of Six Days

Read 'Six Days Adventures' after supper. Bed 11.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Madame de Gomez : La Belle Assemblee: or, The Adventures of Six Days

'Adventures of Six Days' 1 hour after supper. Bed 11.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Madame de Gomez : La Belle Assemblee: or, The Adventures of Six Days

Read 'Adventures of Six Days'. Bed 1.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Conyers Middleton : Free Enquiry into the Miraculous Powers of the Christian Church

[Marginalia by Macaulay on Conyers Middleton's 'Free Enquiry into the Miraculous Powers of the Christian Church']: 'I do not at all admire this letter. Indeed Middleton should have counted the cost before he took his part. He never appears to so little advantage as when he complains in this way of the calumnies and invectives of the orthodox.'

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

John Sturmy : Sesostris: Or, Royalty in Disguise. A Tragedy...

Writt till supper. Read 'Sesostris'. Bed near 12.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Philip Massinger : The Very Woman

Masenger - Believe ye are to blame, much to blame Lady; [...] That Feel a Weight of Sorrow through their Souls.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Andrew Michael Ramsay : The Travels of Cyrus

Read 'travells of Cyrus' alone 2 1/2 hours. A fine book. Bed near 12.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Gertrude Savile      Print: Book

  

Allan Ramsay : The Gentle Shepherd

I finished Allan Ramsay's "Gentle Shepherd", and with some parts have been much pleased - the Scotch is interesting to me from not being acquainted with it.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Horrocks Ainsworth      Print: Book

  

George MacDonald : David Elginbrod

[Editorial commentary by Annie Coghill, Mrs Oliphant's cousin] 'George Macdonald's first book, or at any rate his first successful book, "David Elginbrod", had been published many years before by Messrs Hurst & Blackett, at Mrs Oliphant's warm recommendation. She always spoke of it as a work of genius, and quoted it as one of the instances of publishers' blunders, for when the MS. came to her it came enveloped in wrappings that showed how many refusals it had already suffered.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Manuscript: MS of a book

  

John Morley : Life of George Eliot

'Thank you very much for the "Life of George Eliot," and for the kind and flattering inscription. I am very glad to have the book, which is as curious a book as any I ever saw. The personality of the great writer is as yet very confusing to me in the extreme flatness of the picture. I don't mean by flatness dulness [sic], though there is something of that, but only that it is like mural paintings or sculpture in very low relief. I have just run over your reviewer's article and think it very good.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Book

  

William Mitford : The History of Greece

I have been steadily & delightedly reading Mitford's History. First of all, he is an Historian after my own heart, and I really believe a perfectly upright & honest man [...] the merit of this history is great, in proving that bad as the world is now, even under Christian regulations, it is not nationally anywhere so bad as it was in Pagan Greece - except during the height and fury of the French Revolution - and still and ever perhaps inTurkey.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sarah Harriet Burney      Print: Book

  

William Camden : Britannia: or, a Chorographical Description of Gre

Contains a contents list, index to illustrations, index to maps and cross references to other texts in his library.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Dawson      Print: Book

  

Thomas Moore : Whene'er I see Those Smiling Eyes

To Jane Whene'er I see those smiling eyes... [the 'transcript' does not follow the original to the letter]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: member of Carey/Maingay group     

  

Arthur Murphy : The Grecian Daughter

'Extract from Murphy's Grecian Daughter' 'Filial Affection'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: member of Carey/Maingay group     

  

Mary Masters : To Marinda at Parting

May heavenly Angels their soft wings display And guide you safe thro' ev'ry dangerous way In every step may you most happy be And tho far distant often think of me [some differences from the original]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sophia      

  

Thomas Moore : Lalla Rookh

'I knew, I knew it could not last...' [transcript (exact) of lines 277-294]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: member of Carey/Maingay group     

  

Thomas Moore : Lalla Rookh

'Oh! Had wenever met/...' [transcript of lines 384-387]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: member of Carey/Maingay group     

  

Charles Scudamore : A Chemical and Medical Report of the Properties of

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Thomas Amory : The Life of John Buncle

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

John and Michael Banim : Tales by the O'Hara Family

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Pietro Metastasio : Opere

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

John Haslam : Medical Jurisprudence as it relates to Insanity, a

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

George Samouelle : The Entomologist's Useful Compendium

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Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Joseph Beaumont : Some Observations upon the Apologie of Dr Henry More

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Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Oliver Cromwell : His Highnesse the Lord Protector's speeches to the Parliament in the Painted Chamber

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Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

James MacPherson : The Poems of Ossian, the Son of Fingal

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Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost: a poem in twelve books

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Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Hugh Farmer : A Dissertation on Miracles

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Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Heinrich Rimius : A Candid Narrative of the Rise and Progress of the Herrnhunters

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Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Henry Peter Brougham : A Speech on the Present State of the Law of the Country

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Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Thomas Amory : The Life of John Buncle, Esq

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Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Johann Albert Heinrich Reimarus : Ueber die Grunde der menschlichen Erkentniss und der nat?rlichen Religion

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Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Wilhelm Gottlieb Tennemann : Geschichte der Philosophie

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Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Publius Virgilius Maro : Georgica Publii Virgilii Maronis Hexaglotta

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Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Thomas Bateman : A Practical Synopsis of Cutaneous Diseases

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Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

St John Chrysostom : Commentary on the Ephesians

I read some of Chrysostom's commentary on the Ephesians. I am getting tired of this commentary. Such underground dark passages before you get at anything worth standing to look at! Very eloquent sometimes: but such a monotony & lengthiness! Sunday is not a reading day with me. Driving to church, driving back again, driving to chapel, driving back again - & prayers three times at home besides! All that fills up the day, except the few interstices between the intersections.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Homer : unknown

We [Barrett and Hugh Stuart Boyd] talked comparatively about Homer, Aeschylus & Shakespeare: and positively about Aeschylus's Prometheus ? Praises of the speech in the Medea.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Lamartine : 

Went into the library to try to rationalize my mind about the deathwatch, - by reading the Cyclopaedia. Feel very unwell today, & nervous. Read the mysteries of Udolpho ? by way of quieting my imagination? & heard the boys read Homer & Zenophon - & read some of Victor Hugo?s & Lamartine?s poetry ? his last song of Childe Harold. Miss Steers kindly sent a packet of French poetry to Mr. Boyd?s for me yesterday. Le dernier chant wants the Byronic character (- an inevitable want for a French composition ? ) and is not quite equal even to Lamartine.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Lamartine : Childe Harold

Went into the library to try to rationalize my mind about the deathwatch, - by reading the Cyclopaedia. Feel very unwell today, & nervous. Read the mysteries of Udolpho ? by way of quieting my imagination? & heard the boys read Homer & Zenophon - & read some of Victor Hugo?s & Lamartine?s poetry ? his last song of Childe Harold. Miss Steers kindly sent a packet of French poetry to Mr. Boyd?s for me yesterday. Le dernier chant wants the Byronic character (- an inevitable want for a French composition ? ) and is not quite equal even to Lamartine.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Homer : 

Went into the library to try to rationalize my mind about the deathwatch, - by reading the Cyclopaedia. Feel very unwell today, & nervous. Read the mysteries of Udolpho ? by way of quieting my imagination? & heard the boys read Homer & Zenophon - & read some of Victor Hugo?s & Lamartine?s poetry ? his last song of Childe Harold. Miss Steers kindly sent a packet of French poetry to Mr. Boyd?s for me yesterday. Le dernier chant wants the Byronic character (- an inevitable want for a French composition ? ) and is not quite equal even to Lamartine.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth      Print: Book

  

Callimachus : 

At breakfast, my parcel of books from Eaton came up the road. Fresh from the carrier. Unpacked it eagerly, & read the title pages of Barnes?s Euripides, Marcus Antoninus, Callimachus, the Anthologia, Epictetus, Isocrates, & Da Vinci?s Painting. The last I had sent for, for Eliza Cliffe, but the externals are so shabby that I have a mind to send it back again. Finished my dream about Udolpho; - & began Destiny, a novel by the author of the Inheritance [Susan Ferrier] which Miss Peyton lent me. I liked the Inheritance so much that my desires respecting this book were ?all alive?. I forgot to say that I don?t like the conclusion of the Mysteries. It is ?long drawn out? & not ?in linked sweetness?. Read some of the Alcestis. Mr. Boyd wishes me to read it; & I wished so too.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Richard Harris Barham : The Ingoldsby Legends

'After tea...[on a Sunday, my father]...liked to read aloud to us from books that sounded quite well, but afforded some chance of frivolity.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Molly Vivian      Print: Book

  

James Thomson : The Seasons

'At age thirteen John Clare was shown The Seasons by a Methodist weaver and though he had no real experience of poetry, he was immediately enthralled by Thomson's evocation of spring'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Clare      Print: Book

  

John Milton : 

'Christopher Thomson was a "zealous" Methodist until he discovered Shakespeare, Miilton, Sterne and Dr Johnson at a circulating library. When his absence from Sunday chapel was noticed, "I was called to account for it; by way of defence I pleaded my desire for, and indulgence in, reading. This appeared rather to aggravate than serve my cause. It was evidently their opinion, that all books, except such as they deemed religious ones, ought not be read by young men. I ventured somewhat timidly to hint, that it was possible for a young man to read novels, and other works of fiction, and still keep his mind free from irreligion and vice...".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Christopher Thomson      Print: Book

  

Oliver Goldsmith : 

'Shakespeare incited his appetite for poetry: Cowper, Pope, Dryden, Goldsmith, Thomson, Byron. Not only were they more interesting than the fifty volumes of Wesley's Christian Library: eventually Barker realised that "the reason why I could not understand them was, that there was nothing to be understood - that the books were made up of words, and commonplace errors and mystical and nonsensical expressions, and that there was no light or truth in them". When his superintendent searched his lodgings and found Shakespeare and Byron there, Barker was hauled before a disciplinary committee'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Barker      Print: Book

  

James Thomson : 

'Shakespeare incited his appetite for poetry: Cowper, Pope, Dryden, Goldsmith, Thomson, Byron. Not only were they more interesting than the fifty volumes of Wesley's Christian Library: eventually Barker realised that "the reason why I could not understand them was, that there was nothing to be understood - that the books were made up of words, and commonplace errors and mystical and nonsensical expressions, and that there was no light or truth in them". When his superintendent searched his lodgings and found Shakespeare and Byron there, Barker was hauled before a disciplinary committee'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Barker      Print: Book

  

John Milton : 

'Byron had intoxicated him "with the freedom of his style of writing, with the fervour or passionateness of his feelings and with the dark and terrible pictures which he seemed to take pleasure in painting". The general effect of reading Milton, Hobbes, Locke and Newton had been "to make me resolve to be free. I saw that it was impossible for the soul of man to answer the end for which it was created, while tramelled by human authority, or fettered with human creeds. I saw that if I was to do justice to truth, to God, or to my own soul, I must break loose from all creeds and laws of men's devising, and live in full and unrestricted liberty..."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Barker      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington MacAulay : 

'While he read little but the Bible and religious periodicals, his son was working his way through the Rhymney Workmen's Institute Library and Cassell's National Library of 3d paperbacks. MacAulay's essays, Goldsmith's History of England, Far from the Madding Crowd, Self-Help, Josephus, Plutarch, Shakespeare, Pepys, Johnson's Lives of the Poets, and The Sorrows of Young Werther were among the books Jones read, often on his employer's time. (He hid them under the ledger at the Rhymney Iron Works, where he worked a thirteen hour day as a timekeeper for 9s. a week.)'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Jones      Print: Book

  

Oliver Goldsmith : History of England

'While he read little but the Bible and religious periodicals, his son was working his way through the Rhymney Workmen's Institute Library and Cassell's National Library of 3d paperbacks. MacAulay's essays, Goldsmith's History of England, Far from the Madding Crowd, Self-Help, Josephus, Plutarch, Shakespeare, Pepys, Johnson's Lives of the Poets, and The Sorrows of Young Werther were among the books Jones read, often on his employer's time. (He hid them under the ledger at the Rhymney Iron Works, where he worked a thirteen-hour day as a timekeeper for 9s. a week.)'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Jones      Print: Book

  

Adam Smith : The Wealth of Nations

'The Primitive Methodists may have been the most anti-intellectual of the Wesleyans, yet miners' MP John Johnson... "found their teaching the strongest possible incentive to trying to improve myself, not only morally, but mentally, and towards the latter end I took to serious and systematic study." He read deeply in history and philosophy, as well as such this-worldly tracts as The Wealth of Nations, John Stuart Mill's Principles of Political Economy, and Alfred Marshall's Principles of Economics'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Johnson      Print: Book

  

John Stuart Mill : Principles of Political Economy

'The Primitive Methodists may have been the most anti-intellectual of the Wesleyans, yet miners' MP John Johnson "found their teaching the strongest possible incentive to trying to improve myself, not only morally, but mentally, and towards the latter end I took to serious and systematic study." He read deeply in history and philosophy, as well as such this-worldly tracts as The Wealth of Nations, John Stuart Mill's Principles of Political Economy, and Alfred Marshall's Principles of Economics'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Johnson      Print: Book

  

Alfred Marshall : Principles of Economics

'The Primitive Methodists may have been the most anti-intellectual of the Wesleyans, yet miners' MP John Johnson "found their teaching the strongest possible incentive to trying to improve myself, not only morally, but mentally, and towards the latter end I took to serious and systematic study." He read deeply in history and philosophy, as well as such this-worldly tracts as The Wealth of Nations, John Stuart Mill's Principles of Political Economy, and Alfred Marshall's Principles of Economics'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Johnson      Print: Unknown

  

Charles de Secondat, Baron Montesquieu : The Persian Letters

'The propaganda of Robert Owen alone did not convert printer Thomas Frost to socialism: "The poetry of Coleridge and Shelley was stirring within me and making me 'a Chartist and something more'". Frost had been an omnivorous reader since childhood, when he read his grandmother's volumes of The Spectator and The Persian Letters. Most subversive of all were the letters of the second Lord Lyttelton: "The attraction which this book had for me consisted, I believe, in the tinge of scepticism to be found in several of the letters, and in the metaphysical questions argued, lightly and cleverly, in others. I was beginning to assert for myself freedom of thought, and to rebel against custom and convention; and there was naturally much in common between the writer and the reader",'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Frost      Print: Book

  

John Moore : Travels in France

"'Within the last month I have read Tristram Shandy, Brydone's Sicily and Malta, and Moore's Travels in France,' D[orothy] W[ordsworth] wrote in March 1796."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

John Milton : L'Allegro

'As a Manchester warehouse porter, Samuel Bamford found the same richness in Milton: "His 'L'Allegro' and 'Il Penseroso' were but expressions of thoughts and feelings which my romantic imagination had not unfrequently led me to indulge, but which, until now, I had deemed beyond all human utterance".'

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Bamford      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Il Penseroso

'As a Manchester warehouse porter, Samuel Bamford found the same richness in Milton: "His 'L'Allegro' and 'Il Penseroso' were but expressions of thoughts and feelings which my romantic imagination had not unfrequently led me to indulge, but which, until now, I had deemed beyond all human utterance".'

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Bamford      Print: Book

  

Desiderius Erasmus Rotterdamus : 

'In 1926 [Catherine McMullen] was herself a workhouse laundress, struggling to improve her mind by reading T.P. and Cassell's Weekly. The magazine was full of literary gossip that made her aspire to be a writer, but she had no idea which books to read until she came across Elinor Glyn's The Career of Catherine Bush. In this story of a romance between a duke and a secretary, the secretary is advised to read the Letters of Lord Chesterfield to his Son. Catherine McMullen visited a public library for the first time in her life and borrowed the book: "And here began my education. With Lord Chesterfield I read my first mythology. I learned my first history and geography. With Lord Chesterfield I went travelling the world. I would fall asleep reading the letters and awake around three o'clock in the morning my mind deep in the fascination of this new world, where people conversed, not just talked..." ... He launched her into a lifetime course of reading, beginning with Chaucer in Middle English, moving on to Erasmus, Donne, The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, and even Finnegan's Wake.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Catherine McMullen      Print: Book

  

Oliver Goldsmith : 

'[Mary Smith] found emancipation in Shakespeare, Dryden, Goldsmith and other standard male authors, whom she extolled for their universality: "These authors wrote from their hearts for humanity, and I could follow them fully and with delight, though but a child. They awakened my young nature, and I found for the first time that my pondering heart was akin to that of the whole human race. And when I read the famous essays of Steele and Addison, I could realize much of their truth and beauty of expression... Pope's stanzas, which I read at school as an eight year old child, showed me how far I felt and shared the sentiment that he wrote, when he says, Thus let me live unseen, unknown Thus unlamented let me die; Steal from the world and not a stone Tell where I lie".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Smith      Print: Book

  

Ralph Waldo Emerson : 

'by age twenty [Mary Smith] had read and understood George Payne's Elements of Mental and Moral Science, Thomas Brown's Moral Philosophy, and Richard Whateley's Logic. But two authors in paticular offered magnificent revelations. First there was Emerson on Nature; and later, as a governess for a Scotby leatherworks owner, she discovered Thomas Carlyle: "Emerson and he henceforth became my two great masters of thought for the rest of my life. Carlyle's gospel of Work and exposure of Shams, and his universal onslaught on the nothings and appearances of society, gave strength and life to my vague but true enthusiasm. They proved a new Bible of blessedness to my eager soul, as they did thousands beside, who had become weary of much of the vapid literature of the time".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Smith      Print: Book

  

Homer : Iliad

"[in Aug. 1787 Dorothy Wordsworth] reported that 'I am at present [reading] the Iliad' ... "

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Philip Massinger : Bashful Lover, The

'I have read only one play, the Bashful Lover and one or two of Plutarch's lives since we wrote last.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Lady Beaumont : [letter]

Dorothy Wordsworth describes to Lady Beaumont how she received a letter from her: 'A few minutes before your letter arrived, William [Wordsworth] had set forward with his Daughter on his back, and our little Nursemaid and I were on foot following after, all on our road over the high mountain pass betwixt Grasmere and Patterdale, by which road we were going to Park House to remove the Child from the danger of catching the hooping-cough which is prevalent at Grasmere. The letter was sent after us and we halted by the way-side to read it ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William and Dorothy Wordsworth     Manuscript: Letter

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

'I often think of the happy evening when, by your fireside, my Brother read to us the first book of the Paradise lost ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Symmonds : Life of John Milton, The

William Wordsworth to Francis Wrangham: 'I have read your quondam Friend's, Dr. Symmonds' life of Milton, on some future occasion I will tell you what I think of it.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Francis Wrangham : Human Laws best supported by the Gospel

William Wordsworth to Francis Wrangham: 'I have read your sermon [Human Laws best supported by the Gospel] (which I lately received from Longman) with much pleasure. I only gave it a cursory perusal, for since it arrived my family has been in great confusion, we having removed to another House, in which we are not yet half settled. The Appendix I had received before in a frank, and of that I feel more entitled to speak, because I had read it more at leisure [goes on to discuss this in detail].'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Francis Wrangham : Gospel best promulgated in National Schools, The

William Wordsworth to Francis Wrangham: 'Your sermon [The Gospel best promulgated by National Schools] did not reach me till the night before last. I believe we all have read it, and are much pleased with it.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Wordsworth Family     

  

Oliver Goldsmith : Edwin and Angelina

Henry Mayhew interviews a street author or street poet: "I was very fond of reading poems in my youth, as soon as I could read and understand almost. Yes, very likely sir; perhaps it was that put it into my head to write them afterwards... I was very fond of Goldsmith's poetry always. I can repeat 'Edwin and Emma' now. No sir; I never read the 'Vicar of Wakefield'. I found 'Edwin and Emma' in a book called the 'Speaker'. I often thought of it in travelling through some parts of the country." + recites some of his own poetry to Mayhew

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

Henry Mayhew interviews a penny mouse-trap maker (cripple): "I found books often lull my pain... I can't afford them no, for I have no wish to incur any extraneous expense, while the weight of the labour lies on my family more than it does on myself. Over and over again, when I have been in acute pain with my thigh, a scientific book, or a work on history, or a volume of travels, would carry my thoughts far away ...I always had love of solid works. For an hour's light reading, I have often turned to a work of imagination, such as Milton's Paradise Lost, and Shakespeare's plays; but I prefer science to poetry... I think it is solely due to my taste for mechanics and my love of reading scientific books that I am able to live so comfortably as I do in my affliction."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

Ralph Waldo Emerson : [Essays]

'Philip Inman conveyed a ... specific sense of the uses of literacy for an early Labour MP. The son of a widowed charwoman, he bought up all the cheap reprints he could afford and kept notes on fifty-eight of them... There were Emerson's essays, Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies, Holmes's Autocrat of the Breakfast Table, Lamb's Essays of Elia, classic biogaphies (Boswell on Johnson, Lockhart on Scott, Carlyle on Sterling), several Waverley novels, Wuthering Heights, Don Quixote, Robinson Crusoe, Pilgrim's Progress, The Imitation of Christ, Shakespeare's sonnets, Tennyson, Browning, William Morris and Palgrave's Golden Treasury.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Philip Inman      Print: Book

  

Oliver Wendell Holmes : Autocrat of the Breakfast Table

'Philip Inman conveyed a ... specific sense of the uses of literacy for an early Labour MP. The son of a widowed charwoman, he bought up all the cheap reprints he could afford and kept notes on fifty-eight of them... There were Emerson's essays, Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies, Holmes's Autocrat of the Breakfast Table, Lamb's Essays of Elia, classic biogaphies (Boswell on Johnson, Lockhart on Scott, Carlyle on Sterling), several Waverley novels, Wuthering Heights, Don Quixote, Robinson Crusoe, Pilgrim's Progress, The Imitation of Christ, Shakespeare's sonnets, Tennyson, Browning, William Morris and Palgrave's Golden Treasury.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Philip Inman      Print: Book

  

Charles Lamb : Essays of Elia

'Philip Inman conveyed a ... specific sense of the uses of literacy for an early Labour MP. The son of a widowed charwoman, he bought up all the cheap reprints he could afford and kept notes on fifty-eight of them... There were Emerson's essays, Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies, Holmes's Autocrat of the Breakfast Table, Lamb's Essays of Elia, classic biogaphies (Boswell on Johnson, Lockhart on Scott, Carlyle on Sterling), several Waverley novels, Wuthering Heights, Don Quixote, Robinson Crusoe, Pilgrim's Progress, The Imitation of Christ, Shakespeare's sonnets, Tennyson, Browning, William Morris and Palgrave's Golden Treasury.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Philip Inman      Print: Book

  

Thomas a Kempis : The Imitation of Christ

'Philip Inman conveyed a ... specific sense of the uses of literacy for an early Labour MP. The son of a widowed charwoman, he bought up all the cheap reprints he could afford and kept notes on fifty-eight of them... There were Emerson's essays, Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies, Holmes's Autocrat of the Breakfast Table, Lamb's Essays of Elia, classic biogaphies (Boswell on Johnson, Lockhart on Scott, Carlyle on Sterling), several Waverley novels, Wuthering Heights, Don Quixote, Robinson Crusoe, Pilgrim's Progress, The Imitation of Christ, Shakespeare's sonnets, Tennyson, Browning, William Morris and Palgrave's Golden Treasury.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Philip Inman      Print: Book

  

Christopher Marlowe : Edward II

'At the front of D[ove] C[ottage] MS 16, in use during 1798, D[orothy] W[ordsworth] copied Marlowe's Edward II V.v.55-108, with some omissions ... The extract was copied from Dodsley's Select Collection of Old Plays.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Philip Massinger : Picture, The

' ... a short extract from [Philip] Massinger's The Picture (III.v.211-19) [was] copied by D[orothy] W[ordsworth] into D[ove] C[ottage] MS 16 ... '

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Moschus : Lament for Bion

'During the spring or summer of 1789, W[ordsworth] translated Moschus' Lament for Bion [Idyllium III] ... '

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Ralph Waldo Emerson : 

'Percy Wall, jailed for defying draft notices in the First World War, was inspired in part by a copy of Queen Mab owned by his father, a Marxist railway worker. But neither father nor son applied ideological tests to literature. In the prison library - with some guidance from a fellow conscientious objector who happened to be an important publishing executive - Percy discovered Emerson, Macaulay, Bacon, Shakespeare and Lamb. It was their style rather than their politics he found liberating: from them "I learned self-expression and acquired or strengthened standards of literature".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Percy Wall      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : 

'Percy Wall, jailed for defying draft notices in the First World War, was inspired in part by a copy of Queen Mab owned by his father, a Marxist railway worker. But neither father nor son applied ideological tests to literature. In the prison library - with some guidance from a fellow conscientious objector who happened to be an important publishing executive - Percy discovered Emerson, Macaulay, Bacon, Shakespeare and Lamb. It was their style rather than their politics he found liberating: from them "I learned self-expression and acquired or strengthened standards of literature".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Percy Wall      Print: Book

  

Charles Lamb : 

'Percy Wall, jailed for defying draft notices in the First World War, was inspired in part by a copy of Queen Mab owned by his father, a Marxist railway worker. But neither father nor son applied ideological tests to literature. In the prison library - with some guidance from a fellow conscientious objector who happened to be an important publishing executive - Percy discovered Emerson, Macaulay, Bacon, Shakespeare and Lamb. It was their style rather than their politics he found liberating: from them "I learned self-expression and acquired or strengthened standards of literature".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Percy Wall      Print: Book

  

Thomas More : Utopia

'Emrys Daniel Hughes, [an] imprisoned CO and son of a Tonypandy miner, learned that the authorities were not unaware of the subversive potential of great literature. Following a Home Office directive to examine prisoners' books, the chaplain confiscated a volume of Shelley, though not before Hughes had a chance to read and discuss it. The padre also apparently removed Tristram Shandy from the prison library: Hughes found it whilst cleaning the chaplain's rookm and had read it on the sly... In More's Utopia he discovered a radical rethinking of criume and punishment. The World Set Free, in which HG Wells predicted the devastation of nuclear war, naturally spoke to his antiwar activism, and he was greatly impressed by the Quaker idealism in George Fox's journal, a biography of William Penn and Walt Whitman's poems.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Emrys Daniel Hughes      Print: Book

  

Walt Whitman : 

'Emrys Daniel Hughes, [an] imprisoned CO and son of a Tonypandy miner, learned that the authorities were not unaware of the subversive potential of great literature. Following a Home Office directive to examine prisoners' books, the chaplain confiscated a volume of Shelley, though not before Hughes had a chance to read and discuss it. The padre also apparently removed Tristram Shandy from the prison library: Hughes found it whilst cleaning the chaplain's rookm and had read it on the sly... In More's Utopia he discovered a radical rethinking of criume and punishment. The World Set Free, in which HG Wells predicted the devastation of nuclear war, naturally spoke to his antiwar activism, and he was greatly impressed by the Quaker idealism in George Fox's journal, a biography of William Penn and Walt Whitman's poems.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Emrys Daniel Hughes      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : 

'[Emrys Hughes] read the social history of Macaulay, Froude, and J.R. Green; Thorold Rogers's Six Centuries of Work and Wages particularly appealed to him because it offered "not the history of kings and queens, but of the way ordinary people ha struggled to live throughout the centuries..." Hughes was one of those agitators who found a virtual Marxism in Thomas Carlyle. The French Revolution inspired the hope that a popular revolt somewhere would end the war...'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Emrys Daniel Hughes      Print: Book

  

Charlotte Smith : [sonnets (two)]

'On the rear flyleaf of his copy of [Charlotte Smith's] Elegiac Sonnets [5th edn, 1789]... W[ordsworth] copied two more of Smith's compositions, both of which were first published in her novel, Celestina (1791), and reprinted as XLIX and LI in Elegiac Sonnets (6th edn, 1792) ... W[ordsworth]'s copies vary from both texts as published.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Francis Wrangham : Brutoniad

'[Francis] Wrangham was ... in the habit of reading MS verses to his friends: C[oleridge] heard his "Brutoniad" in Sept. 1794.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis Wrangham      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Thomas Campbell : Gertrude of Wyoming (extracts)

Dorothy Wordsworth to Thomas De Quincey, 1 August 1809: '... I took the pains when I was in Kendal of going to the Book Club to look at the Reviews ... have you seen the Edinburgh Review on Cam[p]bell's Poem [Gertrude of Wyoming]? I know not whther the Extracts brought forward in illustration of the encomiums or the encomiums themselves are more absurd ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

Dorothy Wordsworth writes to Catherine Clarkson (12 November 1810) with description of three nights' stay during October (c.26-29) 1810 at Hackett (overlooking Langdale and other Lakeland locations) with William and Mary Wordsworth, their four children and a maid: 'The weather was heavenly, when we were there, and the first morning we sate in hot sunshine on a crag, twenty yards from the door, while William read part of the 5th Book of the Paradise Lost to us. He read the Morning Hymn, while a stream of white vapour, which covered the Valley of Brathay, ascended slowly and by degrees melted away. It seemed as if we had never before felt deeply the power of the Poet ... '

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

James Thomson : The Seasons

'By age fourteen Durham collier Jack Lawson would find... emancipation at the Boldon Miners' Institute... "And didn't I follow the literary trail, once I found it. Like a Fenimore Cooper Indian I was tireless and silent once I started. Scott; Charles Reade, George Eliot; the Brontes; later on Hardy; Hugo; Dumas and scores of others. Then came Shakespeare; the Bible; Milton and the line of poets generally. I was hardly sixteen when I picked up James Thomson's Seasons, in Stead's 'Penny Poets'... I wept for the shepherd who died in the snow".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Jack Lawson      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : 

'The historical classics "came as a revelation"- Macaulay, J.R. Green, Gibbon, Motley's Dutch Republic, Prescott on Peru and Mexico and The French Revolution. Academic critics today might discern ideologies in all of the above, but that was not Lawson's reading of them. "Of politics I knew nothing and cared less", he recalled, yet his purely literary readings had helped him form "some very definite opinions on the right and wrong of things social..."'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Jack Lawson      Print: Book

  

John Lothrop Motley : The Rise of the Dutch Republic

'The historical classics "came as a revelation"- Macaulay, J.R. Green, Gibbon, Motley's Dutch Republic, Prescott on Peru and Mexico and The French Revolution. Academic critics today might discern ideologies in all of the above, but that was not Lawson's reading of them. "Of politics I knew nothing and cared less", he recalled, yet his purely literary readings had helped him form "some very definite opinions on the right and wrong of things social..."'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Jack Lawson      Print: Book

  

Karl Marx : 

'At Ruskin College he was exposed to Marx, but he found a more compelling Utopian prophet when he read Lewis Carroll to his daughters: "Then one could look at life and affairs from the proper angle, for was not all our work to this end - that little children should live in their Wonderland, and mothers and fathers be heartful of the good of life because they were".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Jack Lawson      Print: Book

  

Karl Marx : 

[Alice Foley] read some Morris and less Marx, but for her a liberal education for the proletariat was not merely a means of achieving socialism: it was socialism in fact. At night school she staged a personal revolution by writing a paper on Romeo and Juliet and thriling to the "new romantic world" of Jane Eyre. She joined a Socialist Sunday School where 'Hiawatha' was recited for its "prophetic idealism", and a foundry hammerman intoned Keats's 'Eve of St Agnes and 'Ode on a Grecian Urn'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Alice Foley      Print: Book

  

William Morris : 

[Alice Foley] read some Morris and less Marx, but for her a liberal education for the proletariat was not merely a means of achieving socialism: it was socialism in fact. At night school she staged a personal revolution by writing a paper on Romeo and Juliet and thriling to the "new romantic world" of Jane Eyre. She joined a Socialist Sunday School where 'Hiawatha' was recited for its "prophetic idealism", and a foundry hammerman intoned Keats's 'Eve of St Agnes and 'Ode on a Grecian Urn'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Alice Foley      Print: Book

  

Charles Lamb : 

'[Chaim Lewis] enthusiastically embraced the literature of an alien culture - "the daffodils of Herrick and Wordsworth... the whimsey of Lamb and the stirring rhythmic tales of the Ballads" and, yes, "the wry eloquence of Shylock".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Chaim Lewis      Print: Book

  

Oliver Wendell Holmes : 

'In a Sunday school library set up by a cotton mill fire-beater, [Thomas Thompson] read Dickens, Thackeray, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and Marcus Aurelius'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Thompson      Print: Book

  

Samuel Smiles : Self Help

'Blatchford, once he read it carefully found [Samuel Smiles's Self Help] "one of the most delightful and invigorating books it has been my happy fortune to meet with".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Peel Glanville Blatchford      Print: Book

  

Samuel Smiles : Self Help

'George Gregory offers a case study in the importance of Self-Help. His father was an illiterate Somsert miner, his mother a servant who read nothing but the Bible... Gregory only had a few school prizes - Jack and the Ostrich, a children's story; The Crucifixion of Philip Strong, a gripping tale of labor unrest; and the verses of Cornish poet, John Harries - and the family read a weekly serial, Strongdold the Gladiator. Having left school at twelve to work in the mines, Gregory had no access to serious reading matter until mid-adolescence, when a clerk introduced him to Self-Help. That book, he recalled in old age, "has lived with me, and in me, for more than sixty years... I was impressed by its quality for I had never touched a book of such high quality; and the impression deepened and became vivid as I took it home, read the stories of men who had helped themselves, struggled against enormous difficulties, suffered privations...but went on to rise phoenix-like from the ruins of their plans... I realised that my lack of education was not decisive of what I might become, so I commenced to reach out into the future".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gregory      Print: Book

  

Thomas Amory : The Life of John Buncle

Dorothy Wordsworth to Catherine Clarkson, 14 August 1811: 'I have read nothing since I wrote to you except bits here and there and the Novel of John Bunkle - but I am going to set to and read - though I have still some sewing to do amongst mending the Bairns' cloaths.'

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Johann Joachim Winkelman : Reflections concerning the imitation of the Grecian Artists in Painting and Sculpture, in a series of Letters'

William Wordsworth to B. R. Haydon, 21 December 1815: 'Have you read the works of the Abbe [Johann Joachim] Winkelman on the study of the Antique, in Painting and Sculpture ... His Works are unknown to me, except a short treatise entitled Reflections concerning the imitation of the Grecian Artists in Painting and Sculpture, in a series of Letters. A translation of this is all I have read having met with it the other day upon a Stal[l] at Penrith ... This Book of mine was printed at Glasgow 1766.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Henry Brougham : A Letter to Sir Samuel Romilly upon the Abuse of Charities

William Wordsworth to Viscount Lowther, 22 September 1818: 'Your two interesting Letters, the Pamphlet, and Sun and Chronicle, have been duly received ... The Pamphlet I have carefully read ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Francis Wrangham : translation of Virgil, Eclogues

William Wordsworth to Francis Wrangham, 19 February 1819: 'I ought to have thanked you before for your versions of Virgil's Eclogues, which reached me at last. I have lately compared it line for line with the original, and think it very well done ... I think I mentioned to you that these Poems of Virgil have always delighted me much; there is frequently in them an elegance and a happiness that no translation can hope to equal. In point of fidelity your translation is very good indeed.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

J. G. Crump : 

Dorothy Wordsworth to Joanna Hutchinson, 5 September 1819: 'We have been very comfortable and without the least bustle until last night when before the Gentlemen had left the dining room our loquacious Friend Mr Myers arrived half tipsy. He produced a letter he had received from Mr Crump and his own answer to it, four sides of a folio sheet which he deputed Mr Monkhouse to read to the gentlemen, and his own comments upon it were loud and long, with stamping and gestures ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Monkhouse      Manuscript: Letter, Sheet

  

Helen Maria Williams : The Charter; addressed to my nephew Athanase C. L. Coquerel, on his wedding day, 1819

William Wordsworth (visiting Paris) to Helen Maria Williams, [15 October 1820], 'I had the honour of receiving your letter yesterday Evening, together with the several copies of your tender and beautiful Verses ... Allow me this opportunity of expressing the pleasure I shall have in possessing this little tribute from yourself - as also, the gratification which the perusal of both the Poems [including 'The Charter'] has afforded me.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Manuscript: Unknown

  

John Beaumont : An Epitaph upon my dear Brother Francis Beaumont

'[Charles] Lamb copied ... [John Beaumont, Bart., the elder, "An Epitaph upon my dear Brother Francis Beaumont"] into his copy of Beaumont and Fletcher's Fifty Comedies and Tragedies (1679).'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Lamb      Print: Unknown

  

John Beaumont : [poems]

'[Sir George] Beaumont wriote to W[ordsworth] on 10 Aug. 1806, saying: "I am sure you will be pleased with my ancestor (sir Johns) Poems. the more I read them the more I am pleased, his mind was elevated, pious & pure."'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sir George Beaumont      

  

Robert Bloomfield : Farmer's Boy, The

S. T. Coleridge to James Tobin, 17 Sept 1800: 'What Wordsworth & I have seen of the Farmer's Boy (only a few short extracts) pleased us very much.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      

  

Robert Bloomfield : Farmer's Boy, The

S. T. Coleridge to James Tobin, 17 Sept 1800: 'What Wordsworth & I have seen of the Farmer's Boy (only a few short extracts) pleased us very much.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Henry Brougham : review of Byron, Hours of Idleness

'[Samuel] Rogers reported W[ordsworth]'s reaction to Brougham's harsh review of Byron's first volume: "Wordsworth was spending an evening at Charles Lamb's, when he saw the said critique, which had just appeared. He read it through, and remarked that 'though Byron's verses were probably poor enough, such an attack was abominable ... "'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Henry Brougham : review of Byron, Hours of Idleness

Henry Crabb Robinson on Wordsworth's reading of Henry Brougham's review of Byron, Hours of Idleness: 'I was sitting with Charles Lamb when Wordsworth came in, with fume on his countenance, and the Edinburgh Review in his hand. "I have no patience with these reviewers," he said, "here is a young man, a lord, and a minor ... and these fellows attack him, as if no one may write poetry unless he lives in a garret."'

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Serial / periodical

  

John Byrom : Epigram on the Feuds Between Handel and Bononcini

'De Qunicey's letter of 27 Aug 1810 to D[orothy] W[ordsworth] contains the last two lines of [John] Byrom's epigram ... which she in turn copied in her letter to Catherine Clarkson of 30 Dec. 1810.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas De Quincey      

  

John Byrom : Epigram on the Feuds Between Handel and Bononcini

'De Qunicey's letter of 27 Aug 1810 to D[orothy] W[ordsworth] contains the last two lines of [John] Byrom's epigram ... which she in turn copied in her letter to Catherine Clarkson of 30 Dec. 1810.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Manuscript: Letter

  

Thomas Campbell : Exile of Erin, The

' ... the first three stanzas and two concluding stanzas of [Thoms] Campbell's poem [The Exile of Erin] were copied and pasted by S[ara] H[utchinson] into the Wordsworth Commonplace Book ... '

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sara Hutchinson      

  

James Grahame : Sabbath, The

'On 7 Aug. 1805 the Wordsworths told Lady Beaumont that "We have just read a poem called the Sabbath written by a very good man in a truly christian spirit ... "'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Wordsworth Family     

  

James Grahame : Birds of Scotland

'W[ordsworth] copied out seven lines of Grahame's poem [Birds of Scotland] in a letter to Lady Beaumont of Dec. 1806, written at Coleorton, commending it as "exquisite".'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Mary Anne Lamb : Dialogue Between a Mother and Child

'Charles Lamb copied ... [Mary Anne Lamb, Dialogue Between a Mother and Child] for D[orothy] W[ordsworth] in a letter of 2 June 1804.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Lamb      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Mary Anne Lamb : Lady Blanch, regardless of her lovers' fears

'Charles Lamb copied ... [Mary Anne Lamb, The Lady Blanch, regardless of her lovers' fears] for D[orothy] W[ordsworth] in a letter of 2 June 1804.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Lamb      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Mary Anne Lamb : Virgin and Child

'Charles Lamb copied ... [Mary Anne Lamb, "Virgin and Child"] for D[orothy] W[ordsworth] in a letter of 2 June 1804.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Lamb      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Mary Anne Lamb : On the Same (Virgin and Child)

'Charles Lamb copied ... [Mary Anne Lamb, "On the Same" ("Virgin and Child")] for D[orothy] W[ordsworth] in a letter of 2 June 1804.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Lamb      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Thomas Malory : Morte D'Arthur

Wu notes translated extract from Sir Bors' lament for Arthur (in the Morte D'Arthur of Thomas Malory) in the Wordsworth Commonplace Book.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Wordsworth Family     Manuscript: Unknown

  

Thomas Robert Malthus : Essay on the Principle of Population, An

'C[oleridge] had read the Essay [on the Principle of Population] shortly after its first appearance in 1798.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

Martin Martin : Description of the Western Islands of Scotland, A

'In late 1808 S[ara] H[utchinson] copied the description of the gawlin from [Martin] Martin, pp.71-2, into C[oleridge]'s notebook ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sara Hutchinson      Print: Book

  

Andrew Marvell : On a Drop of Dew

'C[oleridge]'s letter to S[ara] H[utchinson] of May 1807 contained a transcription of Marvell's "On a Drop of Dew".'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      

  

Andrew Marvell : Horatian Ode upon Cromwell's Return from Ireland, An

'Prelude MS W [Dove Cottage MS 38)] contains a transcription of Marvell's Horatian Ode dating from late 1802.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

John Milton : [sonnets]

Wordsworth in the Fenwick Note to Miscellaneous Sonnets: 'In the cottage of Town-End, one afternoon, in 1801, my Sister read to me the Sonnets of Milton. I had long been well acquainted with them, but I was particularly struck on that occasion with the dignified simplicity and majestic harmony that runs through most of them ... '

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

'During his stay with the Beaumonts at Coleorton, 30 Oct. to 2 Nov. 1806, W[ordsworth] gave several readings from Paradise Lost - including Book I and Book VI, lines 767-84. Beaumont wrote to W[ordsworth] on 6 Nov., recalling "that sublime passage in Milton you read the other night ... where he describes ... the Messiah's ... coming as shining afar off ..."'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Lady Mary Wortley Montagu : Letters

'"In reading Lady Mary W Montagu's letters, whi[ch] we have had lately, I continually felt a want - I had not the least affection for her" D[orothy] W[ordsworth] to Lady Beaumont, 11 April 1805).'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      

  

Hannah More : Coelebs in Search of a Wife

'[Thomas De Quincey] got round to reading ... [Hannah More, Coelebs in Search of a Wife] only in late June or early July [1809], when "I read about 40 pages in the 1st. vol: such trash I really never did read."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas De Quincey      Print: Book

  

Hannah More : Coelebs in Search of a Wife

'Lamb read ... [Hannah More, Coelebs in Search of a Wife] at around ... [June-July 1809] ... on 7 June he told C[oleridge] that "it is one of the very poorest sort of common novels with the drawback of dull religion in it."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Lamb      Print: Book

  

Lindley Murray : Introduction to the English Reader

'In the Fenwick Note to The Pet-lamb, W[ordsworth] recalled: "Within a few months after the publication of this poem, I was much surprised and more hurt to find it in a child's School-book which, having been compiled by Lindley Murray, had come into use at Grasmere School ... "'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Frederick Marryat : 

'In [Ashington Mechanics' Institute] library [Chester Armstrong] discovered a "new world", a "larger environment" in Defoe, Marryat, Fenimore Cooper, Dickens and Jules Verne.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

James Fenimore Cooper : 

'In [Ashington Mechanics' Institute] library [Chester Armstrong] discovered a "new world", a "larger environment" in Defoe, Marryat, Fenimore Cooper, Dickens and Jules Verne.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

Walt Whitman : 

'In 1898 Armstrong organised the Ashington Debating and Literary Improvement Society, and his reading broadened out to Shakespeare, Burns, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Byron, Whitman, Wordsworth, Scott, Robert Browning, Darwin and T.H. Huxley. Robertson Nicoll's British Weekly had introduced him to a more liberal Nonconformity that was hospitable to contemporary literature. The difficulty was that the traditional Nonconformist commitment to freedom of conscience was propelling him beyond the confines of Primitive Methodism, as far as Unitarianism, the Rationalist Press Association and the Independent Labour Party. His tastes in literature evolved apace: Ibsen, Zola. Meredith, and Wilde by the 1890s; then on to Shaw, Wells, and Bennett; and ultimately Marxist economics and Brave New World'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

George Meredith : 

'In 1898 Armstrong organised the Ashington Debating and Literary Improvement Society, and his reading broadened out to Shakespeare, Burns, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Byron, Whitman, Wordsworth, Scott, Robert Browning, Darwin and T.H. Huxley. Robertson Nicoll's British Weekly had introduced him to a more liberal Nonconformity that was hospitable to contemporary literature. The difficulty was that the traditional Nonconformist commitment to freedom of conscience was propelling him beyond the confines of Primitive Methodism, as far as Unitarianism, the Rationalist Press Association and the Independent Labour Party. His tastes in literature evolved apace: Ibsen, Zola. Meredith, and Wilde by the 1890s; then on to Shaw, Wells, and Bennett; and ultimately Marxist economics and Brave New World'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Chester Armstrong      Print: Book

  

David Moir : The Life of Mansie Wauch

'A joiner's son in an early-nineteenth century Scottish village recalled [reading] his first novel, David Moir's The Life of Mansie Wauch (1828): "I literally devoured it... A new world seemed to dawn upon me, and Mansie and the other characters in the book have always been historical characters with me, just as real as Caius Julius Caesar, Oliver Cromwell or Napoleon Bonaparte... So innocent, so unsophisticated - I may as well say, so green - was I, that I believed every word it contained".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: a Scottish joiner's son      Print: Book

  

Constantin Francois de Chasseboeuf comte de Volney : Travels through Syria and Egypt, in the years 1783, 1784, and 1785

Wu notes extracts from vol 1 of Volney, "Travels Through Syria and Egypt", in Dove Cottage MS 28.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Wordsworth Family     Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

Francis Wrangham : [poem]

'Writing to [Francis] Wrangham in late Feb. 1801, W[ordsworth] remarked: "I read with great pleasure a very elegant and tender poem of yours in the 2nd Vol: of the [Annual] Anthology."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Henry Brougham : review of Byron, Hours of Idleness

' ... a most violent attack is preparing for me in the the next number of the Edinburgh Review, this I have from the authority of a friend who has seen the proof and manuscript of the Critique ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: proofManuscript: Unknown

  

Henry Brougham : [speech]

Byron to Edward Ellice, 4 July 1810: 'I hear your friend Brougham is in the lower house mouthing at the ministry ... you remember he would not believe that I had written my pestilent Satire [English Bards and Scotch Reviewers], now that was very cruel and unlike me, for the moment I read his speech, I believed it to be his entire from Exordium to Peroration.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

'Soldier's son Joseph Barker... first read the Bible "chiefly as a work of history and was very greatly delighted with many of its stories... One effect was to lead me to regard miracles as nothing improbable". Consequently his response to Pilgrim's Progress was exactly the same: "My impression was, that the whole was literal and true"...Ghost stories, highwayman stories, fairy tales, Paradise Lost and Daniel Defoe were all equally credible. "I was naturally a firm believer in all that was gravely spoken or printed", he recalled. "I doubted nothing that was found in books... I had no idea at the time I read Robinson Crusoe, that there were such things as novels, works of fiction, in existence".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Barker      Print: Book

  

Alexandre Dumas : 

'When young, Frederick Rogers read not only the Bible as a thriller ("the men and women of the sacred books were as familiar to me as the men and women of Alexander Dumas"), but also Pilgrim's Progress: "There is a dark street yet in East London along which I have run with beating heart lest I should meet any of the evil things Bunyan so vividly described".'

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Frederick Rogers      Print: Book

  

Tobias Smollett : Roderick Random

'As a child, William Heaton the Yorkshire weaver-poet, "rambled with Christian from his home in the wilderness to the Celestial City; mused over his hair-breadth escapes, and his conflict with Giant Despair", enjoying it exactly as he enjoyed Roderick Random and Robinson Crusoe.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Heaton      Print: Book

  

Sir William Drummond : Aedipus Judaicus

Byron to Francis Hodgson, 8 December 1811: 'I have gotten a book by Sir William Drummond (printed, but not published), entitled Oedipus Judaicus, in which he attempts to prove the greater part of the Old Testament an allegory, particularly Genesis and Joshua. He professes himself a theist in the preface, and handles the literal interpretation very roughly. I wish I could see it. Mr Ward has lent it me, and I confess it is worth fifty Watsons.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon, Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

Sir William Drummond : Aedipus Judaicus

Byron to John Cam Hobhouse, 15 December 1811: 'I have been living quietly, reading Sir W. Drummond's book on the bible ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon, Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

Annabella Milbanke : [lines on Dermody]

Byron to Lady Caroline Lamb, 1 May 1812: 'I have read over the few poems of Miss Milbank with attention ... I like the lines on Dermody so much that I wish they were in rhyme. - The lines in the cave at Seaham have a turn of thought which I cannot sufficiently commend ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon, Lord Byron      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Annabella Milbanke : [lines in the cave at Seaham]

Byron to Lady Caroline Lamb, 1 May 1812: 'I have read over the few poems of Miss Milbank with attention ... I like the lines on Dermody so much that I wish they were in rhyme. - The lines in the cave at Seaham have a turn of thought which I cannot sufficiently commend ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon, Lord Byron      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Annabella Milbanke : [poems]

Byron to Lady Caroline Lamb, 1 May 1812: 'I have read over the few poems of Miss Milbank with attention ... A friend of mine (fifty years old & an author but not Rogers) has just been here, as there is no name to the MSS I shewed them to him, & he was much more enthusiastic in his praises than I have been ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: [friend of Byron's, probably Dallas] anon      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Annabella Milbanke : [biography]

Byron to Lady Melbourne, 18 October 1812, on writing by Annabella Milbanke that she has forwarded to him: '... the specimen you send me is more favourable to her talents than her discernment, & much too indulgent to the subject she has chosen ... but you have not sent me the whole (I imagine) by the abruptness of both beginning & end ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon, Lord Byron      Manuscript: Unknown

  

James and Horace Smith : Horace in London; consisting of Imitations of the First Two Books of the Odes of Horace

Byron to John Murray, 20 January 1813; 'In "Horace in London" I perceive some stanzas on Ld. E[lgin] - in which ... I heartily concur. - I wish I had the pleasure of Mr. S[mith]'s acquaintance ... What I have read of this work seems admirably done ... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

Thomas Moore : [poems]

Byron to Thomas Moore, 22 August 1813, in description of Newstead Abbey: 'I remember, when about fifteen, reading your poems there ... '

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon, Lord Byron      

  

Grimm : unknown

Byron to Lady Melbourne, 21 September 1813, from Aston Hall, Rotherham (where staying with Sir James Wedderburn Webster): 'There is a delightful epitaph on Voltaire in Grimm - I read it coming down - the French I should probably misspell so take it only in bad English - "Here lies the spoilt child of the/a world which he spoiled"'.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon, Lord Byron      

  

J. Thomson : unknown

Byron thanks J. Thomson (unidentified) for volume of poems, 27 September 1813: 'I have derived considerable pleasure from ye. perusal of parts of the book - to the whole I have not yet had time to do justice by more than a slight inspection.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon, Lord Byron      

  

Friedrich Melchoir Grimm : Correspondance Litteraire

Byron to Thomas Moore, 8 December 1813: 'I have met with an odd reflection in Grimm ... "Many people have the reputation of being wicked, with whom we should be too happy to pass our lives." I need not add it is a woman's saying - a Mademoisele de Sommery's.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon, Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

Tobias George Smollett : 

...a desire for information which was by no means whollly neglected even whilst I was an apprentice, I always found some time for reading, and I almost always found the means to procure books, useful books, not Novels. My reading was of course devoid of method, and very desultory. I had read in English the only language in which I could read, the histories of Greece and Rome, and some translated works of Greek and Roman writers. Hume, Smollett, Fieldings novels and Robertsons works, some of Humes Essays, some Translations from french writers, and much on geography -some books on Anatomy and Surgery, some relating to Science and the Arts, and many Magazines. I had worked all the Problems in the Introduction to Guthries Geography, and had made some small progress in Geometry.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis Place      Print: Book

  

David Hume : [Hume's Essays]

...a desire for information which was by no means whollly neglected even whilst I was an apprentice, I always found some time for reading, and I almost always found the means to procure books, useful books, not Novels. My reading was of course devoid of method, and very desultory. I had read in English the only language in which I could read, the histories of Greece and Rome, and some translated works of Greek and Roman writers. Hume, Smollett, Fieldings novels and Robertsons works, some of Humes Essays, some Translations from french writers, and much on geography -some books on Anatomy and Surgery, some relating to Science and the Arts, and many Magazines. I had worked all the Problems in the Introduction to Guthries Geography, and had made some small progress in Geometry.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis Place      Print: Book

  

Lord Sligo (2nd marquis of) : [letter on the punishment for adultery in Turkey]

Byron's Journal (14 November 1813-19 April 1814), 5 December 1813: 'I showed ... [John Galt] Sligo's letter on the reports of the Turkish girl's aventure [ie punishment for adultery that became source of Byron's The Giaour] at Athens soon after it happened. He and Lord Holland, Lewis, and Moore, and Rogers, and Lady Melbourne have seen it.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Galt      Manuscript: Letter

  

Lord Sligo (2nd marquis of) : [letter on punishment of adultery in Turkey]

Byron's Journal (14 November 1813-19 April 1814), 5 Deecmber 1813: 'I showed ... [John Galt] Sligo's letter on the reports of the Turkish girl's aventure [ie punishment for adultery that became source of Byron's The Giaour] at Athens soon after it happened. He and Lord Holland, Lewis, and Moore, and Rogers, and Lady Melbourne have seen it.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Richard Fox      Manuscript: Letter

  

Lord Sligo (2nd marquis of) : [letter on punishment for adultery in Turkey]

Byron's Journal (14 November 1813-19 April 1814), 5 Deecmber 1813: 'I showed ... [John Galt] Sligo's letter on the reports of the Turkish girl's aventure [ie punishment for adultery that became source of Byron's The Giaour] at Athens soon after it happened. He and Lord Holland, Lewis, and Moore, and Rogers, and Lady Melbourne have seen it.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Matthew Gregory Lewis      Manuscript: Letter

  

Lord Sligo (2nd marquis of) : [letter on punishment of adultery in Turkey]

Byron's Journal (14 November 1813-19 April 1814), 5 Deecmber 1813: 'I showed ... [John Galt] Sligo's letter on the reports of the Turkish girl's aventure [ie punishment for adultery that became source of Byron's The Giaour] at Athens soon after it happened. He and Lord Holland, Lewis, and Moore, and Rogers, and Lady Melbourne have seen it.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Moore      Manuscript: Letter

  

Lord Sligo (2nd marquis of) : [letter on punishment of adultery in Turkey]

Byron's Journal (14 November 1813-19 April 1814), 5 Deecmber 1813: 'I showed ... [John Galt] Sligo's letter on the reports of the Turkish girl's aventure [ie punishment for adultery that became source of Byron's The Giaour] at Athens soon after it happened. He and Lord Holland, Lewis, and Moore, and Rogers, and Lady Melbourne have seen it.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Rogers      Manuscript: Letter

  

Lord Sligo (2nd marquis of) : [letter on the punishment of adultery in Turkey]

Byron's Journal (14 November 1813-19 April 1814), 5 Deecmber 1813: 'I showed ... [John Galt] Sligo's letter on the reports of the Turkish girl's aventure [ie punishment for adultery that became source of Byron's The Giaour] at Athens soon after it happened. He and Lord Holland, Lewis, and Moore, and Rogers, and Lady Melbourne have seen it.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Melbourne      Manuscript: Letter

  

Leonard Simonde de Sismondi : unknown

Byron's Journal (14 November 1813-19 April 1814), 20 March 1814: 'Redde Machiavel, parts of Chardin, and Sismondi, and Bandello - by starts.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

John Herman Merivale : Orlando in Roncesvalles

Byron to John Herman Merivale, [January 1814]: 'I have redde Roncesvaux with very great pleasure ... You have written a very noble poem ... your measure is uncommonly well chosen & wielded [goes on to advise March publication].'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Annabella Milbanke : [letter]

Byron to Annabella Milbanke, 12 February 1814: 'In thanking you for your letter you will allow me to say that there is one sentence I do not understand ... I will copy it ... "How may I have forsaken that - and under the influence of an ardent zeal for Sincerity - is an explanation that cannot benefit either of us - should any disadvantage arise from the original fault it must be only where it is deserved - Let this then suffice for I cannot by total silence acquiesce in that which if supported when it's [sic] delusion is known to myself would become deception." - - - This I believe is word for word from your letter now before me.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Manuscript: Letter

  

David Hume : [Essays and Treatises]

The whole or nearly the whole of the eight months when I was not employed was not lost. I read many volumes in history, voyages, and travels, politics, law and Philosophy. Adam Smith and Locke and especially Humes Essays and Treatises, these latter I read two or three times over, this reading was of great service to me, it caused me to turn in upon myself and examine myself in a way which I should not otherwise have done. It was this which laid the solid foundation of my future prosperity, and completed the desire I had always had to acquire knowledge.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis Place      Print: Book

  

Adam Smith : Wealth of Nations

The whole or nearly the whole of the eight months when I was not employed was not lost. I read many volumes in history, voyages, and travels, politics, law and Philosophy. Adam Smith and Locke and especially Humes Essays and Treatises, these latter I read two or three times over, this reading was of great service to me, it caused me to turn in upon myself and examine myself in a way which I should not otherwise have done. It was this which laid the solid foundation of my future prosperity, and completed the desire I had always had to acquire knowledge.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis Place      Print: Book

  

Williamson : Euclid

I readily got through a small school book of Geometry and having an odd volume of the 1st of Williamsons Euclid I attacked it vigorously and perseveringly...

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis Place      Print: Book

  

Annabella Milbanke : [letter]

Byron in postscript of letter to Annabella Milbanke, 1 August 1814: 'I have read your letter once more -- and it appears to me that I must have said something which makes you apprehend a misunderstanding on my part of your sentiments ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Manuscript: Letter

  

John Murray : [advertisements for Byron, Lara, and Samuel Rogers, Jacqueline (joint publication)]

Byron to John Murray, 3 August 1814: 'I see advertisements of Lara & Jacqueline -- pray why? when I requested you to postpone publication till my return to town.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: AdvertisementManuscript: Letter

  

Thomas Campbell : Lines on Leaving a Scene in Bavaria

Byron to John Murray, 2 September 1814: ' ... [Thomas Campbell] has an unpublished (though printed) poem on a Scene in Germany (Bavaria I think) which I saw last year -- that is perfectly magnificent ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Unknown

  

Annabella Milbanke : [letter]

Byron to Annabella Milbanke, early in their engagement, 19 September 1814: 'When your letter arrived my sister was sitting near me and grew frightened at the effect of it's contents -- which was even painful for a moment -- not a long one -- nor am I often so shaken.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Manuscript: Letter

  

Annabella Milbanke : [letter to Byron]

Byron to Lady Melbourne, 23 September 1814: 'I am glad you liked Annabella [Milbanke]'s letter to you -- Augusta said that to me (the decisive one ) [ie accepting his marriage proposal] was the best & prettiest she ever read ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Augusta Leigh      Manuscript: Letter

  

Annabella Milbanke : [letter]

Byron to Annabella Milbanke, 16 October 1814: 'In arranging papers I have found the first letter you ever wrote to me -- read it again ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Manuscript: Letter

  

Thomas Moore : article on Boyd's Select Passages from the Writings of St Chrysostom

Byron to Thomas Moore, 10 January 1815: 'I have redde thee upon the Fathers, and it is excellent well ... you must not leave off reviewing. You shine in it ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Serial / periodical

  

John Bramston : [untitled]

he was required to answer to some of the articles, viz. the signing and subscribing the two opinions; but I thinck it was not delivered to the house, for I find it engrossed in parchment,and signed by his councill, Henry Roll, John Hearne, Matthew Hale

Unknown
Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: John Bramston      

  

William Camden : Britannia

Camden does credit this and repeates a tryal one made of forceing a Duck into one of those falls, which came out at the other side by Moles with its feathers allmost all rubbed off,which supposses the passage to be streight, but how they could force the Duck into so difficult a way or whither anything of this is more than Conjecture must be left to every ones liberty to judge.

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Celia Fiennes      Print: Book

  

Charles Robert Maturin : Bertram

Byron to the Rev. Charles Robert Maturin, 21 December 1815, regarding submission of MS [Bertram] to Drury Lane Theatre: 'Sir -- Mr. Lamb -- (one of my colleagues in the S[ub] Committee) & myself have read your tragedy: -- he agrees with me in thinking it a very extraordinary production ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Charles Robert Maturin : Bertram

Byron to the Rev. Charles Robert Maturin, 21 December 1815, regarding submission of MS [Bertram] to Drury Lane Theatre: 'Sir -- Mr. Lamb -- (one of my colleagues in the S[ub] Committee) & myself have read your tragedy: -- he agrees with me in thinking it a very extraordinary production ...'

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: George Lamb      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Lady Caroline Lamb : Glenarvon

Byron to Samuel Rogers, 29 July 1816: 'I have read "Glenarvon" ... & have also seen Ben. Constant's Adolphe ... a work which leaves an unpleasant impression ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

Margaret de Thomas : epitaph to Edmund Ludlow

Byron to Augusta Leigh, 17 September 1816 ("Alpine Journal"), on General Ludlow's monument at Vevey: 'black marble -- long inscription -- Latin -- but simple -- particularly the latter part -- in which his wife (Margaret de Thomas) records her long -- her tried -- and unshaken affection ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Manuscript: tombstone epitaph

  

Cardinal; Lucretia Bembo; de Borgia : letters

Byron to Thomas Moore, 6 November 1816: 'Among many things at Milan, one pleased me particularly, viz. the correspondence ... of Lucretia Borgia wth Cardinal Bembo ... I ... wished sorely to get a copy of one or two of the letters, but is was prohibited ... so I only got some of them by heart. They are kept in the Ambrosian Library, which I often visited to look them over ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Manuscript: Letter, Unknown

  

John Home : Douglas: A Tragedy

During this Spring read Shakspeare [sic] regularly through, and studied the characters of Hamlet, Douglas, Osman in 'Zara', Sir Charles Racket &c and purchased & read a great number of pieces of dramatic biography, and theatrical criticisms.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Cole      Print: Book

  

Lady Caroline Lamb : Glenarvon

Byron to Thomas Moore, 17 November 1816: 'By the way, I suppose you have seen "Glenarvon". Madame de Stael lent it to me to read from Copet last autumn. It seems to me that if the authoress had written the truth ... the romance would not only have been more romantic, but more entertaining.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

George MacDonald : Alec Forbes of Howglen

"Read my birthday book from Walter. 'Alec Forbes of Howglen' by Mac Donald."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Agnes Blanche Hemming      Print: Book

  

George MacDonald : Alec Forbes of Howglen

"Had a long morning to read 'Alec Forbes of Howglen'".

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Agnes Blanche Hemming      Print: Book

  

R.D. Blackmore : Lorna Doone

"Read Lorna Doone in the evening and helped Mother in to bed."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Agnes Blanche Hemming      Print: Book

  

R.D. Blackmore : Lorna Doone

"Much interested in Lorna Doone. It is a truly romantic book."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Agnes Blanche Hemming      Print: Book

  

R.D. Blackmore : Lorna Doone

"Finished reading Lorna Doone and like it very much."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Agnes Blanche Hemming      Print: Book

  

R.D. Blackmore : Lorna Doone

"Read aloud to Maude from Lorna Doone. Very much taken with this little bit - 'the valley into which I gazed was fair with early promise, having shelter from the wind and taking all the sunshine. The willow bushes hung over the stream as if they were angling with tasseled floats of gold & silver, bursting like a bean-pod. Between them came the water laughing like a maid at her own dancing, and spread with that young blue which never lies beyond the April. And on either bank, the meadow ruffled as the breeze came by, opening (through new tufts of green) daisy-bud or celandine, or a shy glimpse now & then of a love-lorn primrose.'"

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Agnes Blanche Hemming      Print: Book

  

R.M. Milnes : 

One of my many visitors this summer, - R.M. Milnes, made earnest enquiry for you. I do hope you like his poetry almost as much as he likes yours. I keep a vol. of his always beside me, - & find some things there almost too beautiful. How wonderful, - almost miraculous is his sympathy, - his understanding of Evil in all its forms, - in combination with his robust cheerfulness of spirits & manners! I know it is the fashion among London people who despise speculative men to dislike Milnes. I cordially honour & like him.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Print: Book

  

Thomas Moore : Lallah Rookh

Byron to John Murray 9 July 1817: 'I have got the sketch & extracts from Lallah Rookh ... the plan as well as the extract I have seen please me very much indeed ...'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      

  

Thomas Moore : Lallah Rookh (extracts)

Byron to Thomas Moore, 10 July 1817: '[John] Murray ... has contrived to send me extracts from Lalla Rookh ... They are taken from some magazine, and contain a short outline and quotations from the two first Poems. I am very much delighted with what is before me, and very thirsty for the rest.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Thomas Moore : Lallah Rookh (extracts)

Byron to John Murray, 15 July 1817: 'I lent [M. G.] Lewis who is at Venice ... your extracts from Lalla Rookh -- & Manuel -- out of contradiction it may be -- he likes the last -- & is not much taken with the first of these performances.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Matthew Gregory Lewis      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Charles Robert Maturin : Manuel

Byron to John Murray, 15 July 1817: 'I lent [M. G.] Lewis who is at Venice ... your extracts from Lalla Rookh -- & Manuel -- out of contradiction it may be -- he likes the last -- & is not much taken with the first of these performances.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Matthew Gregory Lewis      

  

Thomas Moore : Lallah Rookh

Byron to John Murray, 15 September 1817: 'I have read 'Lallah Rookh' -- but not with sufficient attention yet -- for I ride about -- & lounge -- & ponder & -- two or three other things -- so that my reading is very desultory & not so attentive as it used to be.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

Thomas Moore : [poems]

Byron to John Murray, 15 September 1817, on what he perceives to be inferiority of contemporary authors to Pope: 'I am the more confirmed in this - by having lately gone over some of our Classics - particularly Pope ... I took Moore's poems & my own & some others - & went over them side by side with Pope's - and I was really astonished ... and mortified - at the ineffable distance in point of sense - harmony - effect - & even Imagination Passion - & Invention - between the little Queen Anne's Man - & us of the lower Empire ...'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      

  

Kenneth Grahame : The Wind in the Willows

For some reason we were never confronted with the famous animal books in childhood -neither "The Wind in the Willows" nor "Winne-the-Pooh", nor any Beatrix Potter -and when I did meet the works of Kenneth Grahame and A.A. Milne, at the age of twelve or thirteen, I was past them to the extent that I read from a height, like a connoisseur, with no involvement, accepting with sophistication rather than naivety the clothing, the speecg and the human motives of the animals.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Patricia Beer      Print: Book

  

A.A. Milne : Winnie the Pooh

For some reason we were never confronted with the famous animal books in childhood -neither "The Wind in the Willows" nor "Winne-the-Pooh", nor any Beatrix Potter -and when I did meet the works of Kenneth Grahame and A.A. Milne, at the age of twelve or thirteen, I was past them to the extent that I read from a height, like a connoisseur, with no involvement, accepting with sophistication rather than naivety the clothing, the speecg and the human motives of the animals.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Patricia Beer      Print: Book

  

L.M. Montgomery : Anne of Green Gables

After the age of ten, I turned to a series of works which were no less goody-goody, though the svaing blood of Jesus had been transmogrified into a more abstract sense of decency. All the good characters in the 'Anne' and 'Emily' books of L.M. Montgomery were churchgoers, their religious beliefs clearly being basic to their mode of life...

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Patricia Beer      Print: Book

  

L.M. Montgomery : Emily of New Moon

After the age of ten, I turned to a series of works which were no less goody-goody, though the svaing blood of Jesus had been transmogrified into a more abstract sense of decency. All the good characters in the 'Anne' and 'Emily' books of L.M. Montgomery were churchgoers, their religious beliefs clearly being basic to their mode of life...

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Patricia Beer      Print: Book

  

Charles Robert Maturin : Bertram

Byron to Charles, 8th Lord Kinnaird, 15 May 1819: 'Three years & some months ago when you were reding [sic] "Bertram" at your brother's -- on my exclaiming in the words of Parson Adams to his Son -- "Lege Dick -- Lege" (on occasion of some interruption ... ) ... you replied ... "my name is not Richard -- my Lord" ... This was a hint to me to address you in future with all Aristocratical decorum ...'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles 8th Lord Kinnaird      

  

Benvenuto da Imola : Commentary on Dante, Commedia

Byron to Lady Byron, 20 July 1819: 'I tried to discover for Leigh Hunt some traces of Francesca [character in Dante's Inferno] -- but except her father Guido's tomb -- and the mere notice of the fact in the Latin commentary of Benvenuto da Imola in M.S. in the Library -- I could discover nothing for him.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : Lays of Ancient Rome

'I quite agree with you about Leonidas &c. I have greatly enjoyed finding myself a child again over Macaulay's 'Lays'. Castor & Pollux really took away my breath. How beautiful those Lays are!'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Print: Book

  

Mirabeau : 

'[Balzac's] short works although not new are exquisite - La Recherche de L'Absolu- Eugenie Grandet- Modeste Mignon- The last good cheap English books that I remember were the holy verses by Dr. Kitto, & Duffy's Irish Songs & Ballads- For my own part I have been reading 21 volumes of Mirabeau & about as long of Memoires of that great statesman... What a story- & what a man! If you never read Lucas Montigny's Memoires from Mirabeau sa famille & ses ecrits. Do I conjure you. It is the most graphic book in that language of graphic memoires...Macaulay's book is very able- but one wished to find a greater sympathy especially with misfortune - He really likes nobody except that odious Dutchman.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Russell Mitford      Print: Book

  

Lucas Montigny : Memoires de Mirabeau sa famille et ses ecrits

'[Balzac's] short works although not new are exquisite - La Recherche de L'Absolu- Eugenie Grandet- Modeste Mignon- The last good cheap English books that I remember were the holy verses by Dr. Kitto, & Duffy's Irish Songs & Ballads- For my own part I have been reading 21 volumes of Mirabeau & about as long of Memoires of that great statesman... What a story- & what a man! If you never read Lucas Montigny's Memoires from Mirabeau sa famille & ses ecrits. Do I conjure you. It is the most graphic book in that language of graphic memoires...Macaulay's book is very able- but one wished to find a greater sympathy especially with misfortune - He really likes nobody except that odious Dutchman.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Russell Mitford      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : The History of England, from the Accession of James the Second

'[Balzac's] short works although not new are exquisite - La Recherche de L'Absolu- Eugenie Grandet- Modeste Mignon- The last good cheap English books that I remember were the holy verses by Dr. Kitto, & Duffy's Irish Songs & Ballads- For my own part I have been reading 21 volumes of Mirabeau & about as long of Memoires of that great statesman... What a story- & what a man! If you never read Lucas Montigny's Memoires from Mirabeau sa famille & ses ecrits. Do I conjure you. It is the most graphic book in that language of graphic memoires...Macaulay's book is very able- but one wished to find a greater sympathy especially with misfortune - He really likes nobody except that odious Dutchman.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Russell Mitford      Print: Book

  

Frederick Marryat : Mr Midshipman Easy

'During these early years [Daphne du Maurier] filled her head with tales of adventure, romances, histories and popular novels, including such books as Treasure Island, The Snow Queen, The Wreck of the Grosvenor, Old St Paul's, The Tower of London, Nicholas Nickleby, Mr Midshipman Easy, Bleak House, Robinson Crusoe, The Mill on the Floss, Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, The Picture of Dorian Grey, Wuthering Heights and Jane Eyre. The seeds of her own novels were planted during these intensive, sometimes acted-out, reading sessions. The fascination with the sea, the importance of an historical sense of place, the theme of the dual personality, are all reflected in her reading during these formative years'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Daphne du Maurier      Print: Book

  

Allan Ramsay : [poetry]

'[Janet Hamilton] had a heavy literary diet as a child - history by Rollin and Plutarch, Ancient Universal History, Pitscottie's Chronicles of Scotland, as well as the Spectator and Rambler. She could borrow books by Burns, Robert Fergusson and other poets from neighbours, and at age eight she found "to my great joy, on the loom of an intellectual weaver", Paradise Lost and Allan Ramsay's poems'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Janet Hamilton      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

'[Janet Hamilton] had a heavy literary diet as a child - history by Rollin and Plutarch, Ancient Universal History, Pitscottie's Chronicles of Scotland, as well as the Spectator and Rambler. She could borrow books by Burns, Robert Fergusson and other poets from neighbours, and at age eight she found "to my great joy, on the loom of an intellectual weaver", Paradise Lost and Allan Ramsay's poems'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Janet Hamilton      Print: Book

  

Tobias Smollett : 

'Robert White... had somewhat more progressive tastes [than Robert Story], which extended to Shelley, Keats, Childe Harold, and The Lady of the Lake. But his reading stopped short at the Romantics. In 1873 he confessed that he could not stomach avant-garde poets like Tennyson. "As for our modern novel-writers - Dickens, Thackeray and others I do not care to read them, since Smollett, Fielding and Scott especially are all I desire".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert White      Print: Book

  

Thomas Moore : Works

Byron to Thomas Moore, 9 June 1820; 'Galignani has just sent me the Paris edition of your works (which I wrote to order), and I am glad to see my old friends with a French face. I have been skimming and dipping, in and over them, like a swallow, and as pleased as one.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

Thomas Moore : Poems of the Late Thomas Little

Byron to Thomas Moore, 9 June 1820; 'I have just been turning over Little, which I knew by heart in 1803, being then in my fifteenth summer.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

Thomas Moore : Poems of the Late Thomas Little

Byron to Thomas Moore, 9 June 1820; 'I have just been turning over Little, which I knew by heart in 1803, being then in my fifteenth summer.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

Jean Charles Sismondi : History of the Italian Republics in the Middle Ages

Byron to John Murray, 17 July 1820, on books used in research for Marino Faliero, Doge of Venice: 'I have consulted Sanuto -- Sandi -- Navagero -- & an anonymous Siege of Zara -- besides the histories of Laugier Daru -- Sismondi &c.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

Henry Matthews : Diary of an Invalid

Byron to John Murray, 22 July 1820, about books received: 'the diary of an Invalid good and true bating a few mistakes about "Serventismo" which no foreigner can understand ... without residing years in the country. -- I read that part (translated that is) to some of the Ladies in the way of knowing how far it was accurate and they laughed particularly at the part where he says that "they must not have children by their lover" ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

Tobias Smollett : 

[due to the fact that books in working class communities were generally cheap out of copyright reprints, not new works] Welsh collier Joseph Keating was able to immerse himself in Swift, Pope, Fielding, Richardson, Smollett, Goldsmith, Sheridan, Goldsmith, Keats, Byron, Shelley, Dickens and Greek philosophy, as well as the John Dicks edition of Vanity Fair in weekly installments. The common denominator among these authors was that they were all dead. "Volumes by living authors were too high-priced for me", Keating explained. "Our schoolbooks never mentioned living writers; and the impression in my mind was that an author, to be a living author, must be dead and that his work was all the better if he died of neglect and starvation".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Keating      Print: Book

  

Oliver Goldsmith : 

[due to the fact that books in working class communities were generally cheap out of copyright reprints, not new works] Welsh collier Joseph Keating was able to immerse himself in Swift, Pope, Fielding, Richardson, Smollett, Goldsmith, Sheridan, Goldsmith, Keats, Byron, Shelley, Dickens and Greek philosophy, as well as the John Dicks edition of Vanity Fair in weekly installments. The common denominator among these authors was that they were all dead. "Volumes by living authors were too high-priced for me", Keating explained. "Our schoolbooks never mentioned living writers; and the impression in my mind was that an author, to be a living author, must be dead and that his work was all the better if he died of neglect and starvation".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Keating      Print: Book

  

Jerome K. Jerome : Three Men in a Boat

'[Joseph Keating's] initiation into modern literature came when his brother introduced him to Jerome K. Jerome's Three Men in a Boat: "I had thought that only Smollett and Dickens could make a reader laugh; and I was surprised to find that a man who was actually living could write in such a genuinely humorous way'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Keating      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Felicia Hemans : 

'orphanage boy Thomas Burke... devoured books until "my mind became a lumber room". Inevitably, "criticism was beyond me; the hungry man has no time for the fastidiousness of the epicure. I was hypnotised by the word Poet. A poem by Keats (some trifle never meant for print) was a poem by Keats. Pope, Cowper and Kirke White and Mrs Hemans and Samuel Rogers were Poets. That was enough."'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Burke      Print: Unknown

  

Charles Lamb : unknown

'As one participant recalled, "Many exceptional debates come back to mind on such subjects as Jane Austen, Charles Lamb, Victorian Novelists, George Eliot, Meredith, Pepys and the Navy, Frederick the Great, Wordsworth, Shelley, Napoleon, where the speaking was of high level and the debating power considerable."'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Ladies' Edinburgh Debating Society     Print: Book

  

Meredith : unknown

'As one participant recalled, "Many exceptional debates come back to mind on such subjects as Jane Austen, Charles Lamb, Victorian Novelists, George Eliot, Meredith, Pepys and the Navy, Frederick the Great, Wordsworth, Shelley, Napoleon, where the speaking was of high level and the debating power considerable."'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Ladies' Edinburgh Debating Society     Print: Book

  

F Marion Crawford : 

'As for Mona Maclean I am afraid I could not say more than that it is a cleverish very youthful book, the author of which if she comes to anything will probably much regret having published it some years back. Marion Crawford's last novel is clever of course as are all his, but not pleasant and very long and dreary I think.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Book, Serial / periodical

  

William Mitford : History of Greece

Byron's Ravenna Journal (4 January-27 February 1821), 5 January 1821: 'Read Mitford's History of Greece -- Xenophon's Retreat of the Ten Thousand.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

Metastasio : Betulia Liberata

" Read Betula (sic) Liberata to my beloved. Explained all the difficult passages."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Eleanor Butler      Print: Book

  

William Mitford : History of Greece

Byron's Ravenna Journal (4 January-27 February 1821), 6 January 1821: Read Spence's Anecdotes ... Corrected blunders in nine apophthegms of Bacon -- all historical -- and read Mitford's Greece.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

William Mitford : History of Greece

Byron's Ravenna Journal (4 January-27 February 1821), 6 January 1821: 'Came home [after going visiting at 8pm], and read Mitford again, and played with my mastiff ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

William Mitford : History of Greece

Byron's Ravenna Journal (4 January-27 February 1821), 8 January 1821: 'Came home [from ?Guicciolis', where visited at 8pm] -- read History of Greece -- beore dinner had read Walter Scott's Rob Roy.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

Thomas Campbell : Specimens of the British Poets (including prefatory Essay on English Poetry)

Byron's Ravenna Journal (4 January-27 February 1821), 10 January 1821: 'Looked over accounts. Read Campbell's Poets -- marked errors of Tom (the author) for correction. Dined ...'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

Thomas Campbell : Specimens of the British Poets (including prefatory Essay on English Poetry)

Byron's Ravenna Journal (4 January-27 February 1821), 10 January 1821: '[after going out to hear music] Came home -- read. Corrected Tom Campbell's slips of the pen.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

Thomas Campbell : Specimens of the British Poets (including prefatory Essay on English Poetry)

Byron's Ravenna Journal (4 January-27 February 1821), 11 January 1821: 'In reading, I have just chanced upon an expression of Tom Campbell's; speaking of Collins, he says that "no reader cares any more about the characteristic manners of his Eclogues than about the authenticity of the tale of Troy." 'Tis false ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

Thomas Campbell : Specimens of the British Poets (including prefatory Essay on English Poetry)

Byron's Ravenna Journal (4 January-27 February 1821), 12 January 1821: 'Read the Poets -- English that is to say -- out of Campbell's edition. There is a good deal of taffeta in some of Tom's prefatory phrases, but his work is good as a whole.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Sabrina Fair

Byron's Ravenna Journal (4 January-27 February 1821), 12 January 1821: 'How strange are my thoughts! -- The reading of the song of Milton, "Sabrina fair" has brought back upon me ... the happiest, perhaps, days of my life ... when living at Cambridge with Edward Noel Long ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

Thomas Moore : Epistles, Odes and Other Poems

Byron's Ravenna Journal (4 January-27 February 1821), 12 January 1821, on memories of Cambridge life with friend Edward Noel Long: 'I remember our buying, with vast alacrity, [Thomas] Moore's new quarto (in 1806) and reading it together in the evenings.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon, Lord Byron, and Edward Noel Young.     Print: Book

  

William Mitford : History of Greece

Byron's Ravenna Journal (4 January-27 February 1821), 13 January 1821: 'Sketched the outline and Drams. Pers. of an intended tragedy of Sardanapalus ... read over a passage in the ninth vol. octavo of Mitford's Greece, where he rather vindicates the memory of this last of the Assyrians.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

William Mitford : History of Greece

Byron's Ravenna Journal (4 January-27 February 1821), 15 January 1821: '... dined -- dipped into a volume of Mitford's Greece -- wrote part of a scene of "Sardanapalus".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

Friedrich Melchior Grimm : Correspondence Litteraire

Byron's Ravenna Journal (4 January-27 February 1821), 20 January 1821: 'Rode -- fired pistols. Read from Grimm's Correspondence. Dined ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

Friedrich Melchior Grimm : Correspondence Litteraire

Byron's Ravenna Journal (4 January-27 February 1821), 21 January 1821: 'Dined -- visited -- came home -- read. Remarked on an anecdote in Grimm's Correspondence ... [reproduces part of text of vol. VI]'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

Friedrich Melchior Grimm : Correspondence Litteraire

Byron's Ravenna Journal (4 January-27 February 1821), 31 January 1821 entry: 'Midnight. I have been reading Grimm's Correspondence.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

Friedrich Melchior Grimm : Correspondence Litteraire

Byron's Ravenna Journal (4 January-27 February 1821), 18 February 1821: 'In turning over Grimm's Correspondence to-day, I found a thought of Tom Moore's in a song of Maupertuis to a female Laplander ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

Ruddiman : Latin Grammar

Byron's "Dictionary" (journal), 1 May 1821, on studies with tutor (Paterson): 'With him I began Latin in Ruddiman's Grammar ...'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

Thomas Moore : [letter]

Byron to Thomas Moore, 16 November 1821, on literary ambitions of an Irish visitor, John Taaffe: 'I read a letter of yours to him yesterday, and he begs me to write to you about his Poeshie.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Manuscript: Letter

  

Thompson : book of prescriptions

Byron to John Murray, 9 October 1822, on his recent illness (painfully and ineffectually treated by a local doctor): 'At last I seized Thompson's book of prescriptions -- (a donation of yours) and physicked myself with the first dose I found in it ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

Antoine Francois Sergent-Marceau : Notices Historiques sur le General Marceau

Byron to Madame Sergent-Marceau, 5 May 1823 (translated from Italian): 'no present you might give me would be more welcome than the short work in which the actions of your Brother [General Marceau], whose memory I revere, are so well described. I have read this work with the greatest pleasure ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

Mary Louisa Molesworth : The Cuckoo Clock

'In September and October [Grace Macaulay] is reading aloud to Margaret (ill with scarlet fever) Mrs Molesworth's The Cuckoo Clock and Charlotte M. Yonge's Chaplet of Pearls and The Heir of Redclyffe'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Grace Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Frederick Marryat : The Settlers in Canada

'[Grace Macaulay's diary] entry for 2 March 1890 records that she "read the boys parts of Settlers at Home and Otto Spectere (sic), all of which Will as well as Aulay much enjoyed".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Grace Macaulay      Print: Book

  

George Meredith : 

'Rose... remembers her father reading to them - Dickens, Scott, Robinson Crusoe, Shakespeare, Jane Austen, Meredith, Tom Jones, The Three Musketeers, Don Quixote, and, curiously, The Origin of Species'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Alexandre Dumas (pere) : The Three Musketeers

'Rose... remembers her father reading to them - Dickens, Scott, Robinson Crusoe, Shakespeare, Jane Austen, Meredith, Tom Jones, The Three Musketeers, Don Quixote, and, curiously, The Origin of Species'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Frederick Marryat : Masterman Ready

'When old enough to read for herself, Rose Macaulay entered into other realms of fictitious brave adventure. She devoured Masterman Ready, Ivanhoe, The Talisman, Coral Island, Treasure Island, A Tale of Two Cities, The Murders in the Rue Morgue, The Prince and the Page

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Rose Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Lord Mahon : The Life of Louis, Prince of Conde, Surnamed the Great

'The neighbours and we have set up a book-club since the beginning of the year, & I want to beg you to tell me of some [italics] booklings [end italics] for it. We have got Macaulay and Layard, and the "Monasteries of the Levant," and other big books, but I want some moderately moral French novel, or some very amusing two and sixpence or five-shilling English book to keep the thing going. Such a book as "La Mare au Diable", or "La Chasse au Roman," would be the thing, or Murray's "Life of Conde", or his "Memoirs of a Missionary." Can you kindly recommend some?'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Caroline Clive      Print: Book

  

Thomas a Kempis : On The Imitation of Christ

Rose Macaulay had a 'craze' 'for the ascetic Thomas a Kempis's meditations and rule of conduct, On The Imitation of Christ, which her godmother gave her when she was 13'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Rose Macaulay      Print: Book

  

John Stuart Mill : probably 'On Liberty'

'She read Renan's Life of Jesus, which had proved so critical to George Eliot's subsitution of Duty for God. As a corollary text, Rose discovered the rousing, hopeful words of Mill, who argued for the sacredness of her larger duty to herself'.

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Rose Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : History of England

'Working class readers continued to enjoy Macaulay's drama and accessibility long after professional historians had declared him obsolete. Kathleen Woodward read Gibbon's Decline and Fall and Macaulay's History of England twice through over factory work, with such absorption she once injured a finger, leaving "an honourable scar".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Kathleen Woodward      Print: Book

  

John Milton : 

'[J.M. Dent's] reading was marked by the autodidact's characteristic enthusiasm and spottiness. He knew Pilgrim's Progress, Milton, Cowper, Thomson's Seasons and Young's Night Thoughts; but...did not read Shakespeare seriously until he was nearly thirty'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Malaby Dent      Print: Book

  

James Thomson : The Seasons

'[J.M. Dent's] reading was marked by the autodidact's characteristic enthusiasm and spottiness. He knew Pilgrim's Progress, Milton, Cowper, Thomson's Seasons and Young's Night Thoughts; but...did not read Shakespeare seriously until he was nearly thirty'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Malaby Dent      Print: Book

  

William Morris : 

'[J.M. Dent's] cultural contacts broadened when he became an apprentice bookbinder in London, discovering the work of William Morris, Cobden-Sanderson and the Arts and Crafts Movement'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Malaby Dent      Print: Book

  

Edward Bellamy : Looking Backward: 2000-1887

'James Murray, a Glasgow woodcarver, represented the kind of reader Dent and Rhys were trying to reach. He credited Everyman magazine with "opening up an entirely new set of ideas to which I had previously been a stranger. I became familiar with the names and works of all the truly great authors and poets, and was now throughly convinced I had been misplaced in my life's work". His reading ranged from Rasselas to Looking Backward'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: James Murray      Print: Book

  

George Meredith : 

'In the Star [Philip] Ballard read the music criticism of Bernard Shaw, and Richard le Gallienne on books... He pressed on to Meredith and Walter Pater'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Philip Ballard      Print: Book, Unknown

  

Charles Lamb : Tales from Shakespeare

'every day Spike Mays ran to his East Anglia school, where he studied "Robinson Crusoe", "Gulliver's Travels" and "Tales from Shakespeare".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Spike Mays      Print: Book

  

John Stuart Mill : 

'"One advantage of leaving school at an early age is that one can study subjects of your own choice", wrote Frank Argent, son of a Camberwell labourer. Taking advantage of the public library and early Penguins, he ranged all over the intellectual landscape: Freudian psychology, industrial administration, English literature, political history, Blake, Goethe, Mill,Nietzsche, The Webbs, Bertrand Russell's Essays in Scepticism, and Spengler's "The Decline of the West".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Frank Argent      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Lycidas

'Lancashire weaver Elizabeth Blackburn... proceeded to an evening institute course in English literature and by the rhythm of the looms she memorised all of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, Shelley's "Ode to the West Wind", Milton's Lycidas, and Gray's Elegy. She discovered the ancient Greeks at the home of a neighbour, a self-educated classicist with six children, and a Sunday school teacher introduced her to the plays of Bernard Shaw. While attending her looms she silently analysed the character of Jane Eyre's Mr Rochester, "sometimes to the detriment of my weaving".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Blackburn      Print: Book

  

Charles Lamb : Pride's Cure

Dorothy Wordsworth's Grasmere Journal, Saturday 4 October 1800: 'A ... rather showery and gusty, morning ... Read a part of Lamb's play.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      

  

?James Thomson : unknown

Dorothy Wordsworth's Grasmere Journal, Sunday 15 November 1801: 'We sate by the fire and read Chaucer (Thomson, Mary read) and Bishop Hall.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Hutchinson      

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost (Book I)

Dorothy Wordsworth's Grasmere Journal, Friday 29 January, 1802: 'William was very unwell. Worn out with his bad night's rest. He went to bed -- I read to him, to endeavour to make him sleep. Then I came into the other room and read the first book of Paradise Lost.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Thomas Campbell : The Pleasures of Hope

Dorothy Wordsworth's Grasmere Journal, Monday 1 February, 1802: 'In the morning a Box of clothes with Books came from London. I sate by his [William Wordsworth's] bedside, and read in The Pleasures of Hope to him, which came in the box.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost (Book XI)

Dorothy Wordsworth's Grasmere Journal, Tuesday 2 February, 1802: 'After tea I read aloud the eleventh book of Paradise Lost. We were much impressed, and also melted into tears.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

John Milton : sonnets

Dorothy Wordsworth's Grasmere Journal, Friday 21 May 1802, 'Wm. wrote two sonnets on Buonaparte, after I had read Milton's sonnets to him.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Il Penseroso

Dorothy Wordsworth's Grasmere Journal, in entry for Thursday 3 June 1802, 'A very affecting letter came from M[ary]. H[utchinson]., while I was sitting in the window reading Milton's Penseroso to William.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

John Milton : sonnets

Dorothy Wordsworth's Grasmere Journal, 24 December 1802: 'William is now sitting by me, at 1/2 past 10 o'clock. I have been beside him ever since tea running the heel of a stocking, repeating some of his own sonnets to him, listening to his own repeating, reading some of Milton's, and the Allegro and Penseroso.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy and William Wordsworth     Print: Book

  

John Milton : L'Allegro

Dorothy Wordsworth's Grasmere Journal, 24 December 1802: 'William is now sitting by me, at 1/2 past 10 o'clock. I have been beside him ever since tea running the heel of a stocking, repeating some of his own sonnets to him, listening to his own repeating, reading some of Milton's, and the Allegro and Penseroso.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy and William Wordsworth     Print: Book

  

John Milton : Il Penseroso

Dorothy Wordsworth's Grasmere Journal, 24 December 1802: 'William is now sitting by me, at 1/2 past 10 o'clock. I have been beside him ever since tea running the heel of a stocking, repeating some of his own sonnets to him, listening to his own repeating, reading some of Milton's, and the Allegro and Penseroso.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy and William Wordsworth     Print: Book

  

Charlotte Smith : Elegiac Sonnets

Dorothy Wordsworth's Grasmere Journal, 24 December 1802: 'William is now sitting by me, at 1/2 past 10 o'clock. I have been beside him ever since tea ... My beloved William is turning over the leaves of Charlotte Smith's sonnets ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Thomas Campbell : The Pleasures of Hope

'Tea between 9 and 10. I read aloud a little of 'The Pleasures of Hope'. Mrs Barlow [friend and lover] sat hemming one end of tablecloth and we were very cosy and comfortable.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Lister      Print: Book

  

Henry Moore : Buxton and Casleton Guide Picturesque Excursions i

' Tea at 8. Read aloud to my aunt the first 31pp of Moore's Buxton and Castleton Guide.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Lister      Print: Book

  

Thomas Moore : The Loves of the Angels

[Extensive discusion of the text in a letter to Marianne Lawson 15/03/1823.] ...Throw in too, I grant, some fine poetry from p.48 to 63 but [it] is too voluptuous, too Anacreonic, too much that 'by the wildered senseis caught' ' [Quotes from 'The Second Angel's Tale' several times].

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Lister      Print: Book

  

Jane Marcet : Conversations on Natural Philosophy

[Letter dated 1823, to Miss Pickford]. Madame Marcet is a very good guide as far as she goes, but surely respecting the system of pulleys she has not gone quite far enough. She has left us to ourselves rather too soon'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Lister      Print: Book

  

Oliver Goldsmith : The Grecian History

The Grecian History has pleased me much you know Mr Trant made a present of the Roman History, what a brave people the Greeks in general were.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Lister      Print: Book

  

Oliver Goldsmith : The Vicar of Wakefield

I was rather unwell for about an hour, but not very bad when I could go on reading The Vicar of Wakefield

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Lister      Print: Book

  

Alexandre Dumas (pere) : [unknown]

'The son of a barely literate Derbyshire collier recalled a sister, a worker in a hosiery factory, who was steeped in the poetry of Byron, Shelley, Keats and D.H. Lawrence. Their mother's reading "would astonish the modern candidate for honours in English at any university", he claimed. "Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Turgeniev, Dumas, Hugo, Thackeray, Meredith, Scott, Dickens, all the classics, poetry etc., all these gave her immense joy".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Sutton      Print: Book

  

George Meredith : [unknown]

'The son of a barely literate Derbyshire collier recalled a sister, a worker in a hosiery factory, who was steeped in the poetry of Byron, Shelley, Keats and D.H. Lawrence. Their mother's reading "would astonish the modern candidate for honours in English at any university", he claimed. "Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Turgeniev, Dumas, Hugo, Thackeray, Meredith, Scott, Dickens, all the classics, poetry etc., all these gave her immense joy".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Sutton      Print: Book

  

Anthony Todd Thomson : A Conspectus of the pharmacopeias of the London [e

'Dr Scudamore, recommended and has just sent me to look at Thomsons Conspectus of the Pharmacopeias, a nice little 42mo. Price 5/-, 5th edition.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Lister      Print: Book

  

Desmosthenes : All the Orations of Demosthenes

Read...Demosthenes +...Lelands translation. This is the 4th Greek work I have read thro' & I certainly feel considerably improved but I am disatisfied with myself for not having got up in the morning as early as I thought.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Lister      Print: Book

  

William Emerson : The principle of mechanics

Had no time for Eudid but looked into Emerson's mechanics for 1/4 hour, as I wish to prepare myself a little for Dalton's lectures which are to begin on Wednesday and which I mean to attend.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Lister      

  

Thomas Moore : Lallah Rookh or 'Review'

Just after ten read aloud to my aunt the very favourable review of Lallah Rookh; an Oriental romance by Thomas Moore...The extracts from this poetic romance are very beautiful.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Lister      

  

Dr Scudamore : Lectures on physiology

'At 12 Marianna and I went upstairs. She sat sewing and I reading aloud to her the first 3 or 4 pages of the M.S. Lectures on physiology Dr Scudamore lent me 10 days ago. The writing so bad we could not get on very fast. Both of us uninterested.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Lister      Manuscript: Sheet

  

William Emerson : Mechanics or The Principles of Mechanics

had no time for Euclid but looked into Emerson's Mechanics for 1/4 hour as I wish to prepare myself a little for Dalton's lectures which are to begin on Wednesday.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Lister      Print: Book

  

Rev. Richard H. Barham : The Ingoldsby Legends

'Frances Stevenson, born in 1888, recollected [in The years that Are Past, 1967] that she "read greedily [pre-1914] ... I formed an early acquaintance with Dickens, weeping copiously over Little Dorrit and Little Nell, and I knew by heart many of the passages in the Ingoldsby Legends, a volume that had been given me ... when I was ten years old! ... I lost myself in a magical world while reading the poems of Scott. I think I read them all one summer holiday, in a special spot in our garden ..."'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Frances Stevenson      Print: Book

  

Mrs Meek : Ellesmere

'Frances Stevenson, born in 1888, recollected [in The years that Are Past, 1967] that she "read greedily [pre-1914] ... Even before my teens my reading entered upon the romantic stage. I read Quo Vadis ... Rider Haggard's She ... Robert Ellesmere ..."'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Frances Stevenson      Print: Book

  

Oliver Goldsmith : unknown

'[William Robertson] Nicoll's boyhood reading included Scott, Disraeli, the Brontes, Bulwer Lytton, Shelley, Johnson, Addison, Steele, Goldsmith, Emerson, Lowell, Longfellow ...' [Nicoll's father a Scottish clergyman who amassed library of 17,000 volumes.]

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: William Robertson Nicoll      Print: Book

  

Ralph Waldo Emerson : unknown

'[William Robertson] Nicoll's boyhood reading included Scott, Disraeli, the Brontes, Bulwer Lytton, Shelley, Johnson, Addison, Steele, Goldsmith, Emerson, Lowell, Longfellow ...' [Nicoll's father a Scottish clergyman who amassed library of 17,000 volumes.]

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: William Robertson Nicoll      Print: Book

  

Fergus Hume : The Mystery of the Hansom Cab

'In A Young Man's Passage (1950), Mark Tellar recalls "confessing to his prep-school teacher that during the holidays he had read Conway's 'Called Back', together with Fergus Hume's 'The Mystery of the Hansom Cab' (1887), and stories by Miss M. E. Braddon, Mrs Henry Wood, and Ouida."'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Mark Tellar      Print: Unknown

  

Captain Marryat : [novels]

"Robert Blatchford, growing up in Halifax in the 1860s, read from the penny library there Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, Southey's Life of Nelson, Dickens's The Old Curiosity Shop, and novels by Captain Marryat, the Brontes, and Miss M. E. Braddon."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Blatchford      Print: Book

  

Charles Mackay (ed) : A Thousand and One Gems of English Poetry

"[In Lark Rise to Candleford (1947)] Flora Thompson recollected young Willie, whose family were village carpenters, being fond of reading, including poetry: 'somehow he had got posession of an old shattered copy of an anthology called A Thousand and One Gems', which he read aloud with her, sitting under nut trees at the bottom of the garden, in the 1890s."

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Willie anon      Print: Book

  

Karl Marx : Das Kapital

"[George Bernard] Shaw had read Marx's Das Kapital (in French translation) and he was converted to socialism ..."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Bernard Shaw      Print: Book

  

John Milton : unknown

Philip Gibbs in The Pageant of the Years (1946), on work as writer of series of articles under name "Self-Help" in early 1900s: "'All the reading I had done as a boy, all my youthful enthusiasm for Shakespeare, Milton, Scott, Thackeray, Dickens, George Eliot, and Hardy ... was a great source of supply now when I sat down to write aout great books ..."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Philip Gibbs      Print: Book

  

Herman Melville : Typee

"As a teenager ... [Holbrook Jackson] had been transported from Merseyside to the South Sea Islands. The vessel that bore him was imagination in the form of a 'musty copy' of Herman Melville's Typee (1846), bought for 3d. from a second-hand bookstall by the Liverpool docks."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Holbrook Jackson      Print: Book

  

Caroline Lamb : Glenarvon

In the afternoon, read aloud the first 30pp. glenarvon, vol.2. Miss Goodricke called and sat a little while with us. the girls introduced me. She thanked me for the book I had bought for Miss Morritt from Miss Emily Cholmley...

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Lister      Print: Book

  

Anthony Todd Thomson : A conspectus of the pharmacopeias of the London

Dr Scudamore, recommended and has just sent me to look at Thomsons Conspectus of the Pharmacopeias, a nice little 42 mo. Price 5/-, 5th edition

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Lister      Print: Book

  

Karl Marx : unknown

'[George] Saintsbury [who became a Tory journalist] read Marx as an undergraduate ...'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Saintsbury      Print: Book

  

Alexandre Dumas : Valois cycle

'In 1917 ... [John Buchan] was treated for a duodenal ulcer. Recuperating after the operation, he read through a dozen of the Waverley Novels, the Valois and D'Artagnan cycles of Dumas, then Victor Hugo's "Notre Dame" and the immense "Les Miserables" ... ending up with half a dozen of Balzac ...'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buchan      Print: Book

  

Alexandre Dumas : D'Artagnan cycle

'In 1917 ... [John Buchan] was treated for a duodenal ulcer. Recuperating after the operation, he read through a dozen of the Waverley Novels, the Valois and D'Artagnan cycles of Dumas, then Victor Hugo's "Notre Dame" and the immense "Les Miserables" ... ending up with half a dozen of Balzac ...'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: John Buchan      Print: Book

  

Homer : The Iliad

I procured a Greek grammar, and soon made considerable progress. I first read the New Testament almost throughout; then the Iliad of Homer, not omitting a line nor leaving a word obscure; then part of the Odyssey, which was recalled before I could finish it.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Lutton      Print: Book

  

Homer : The Odyssey

I procured a Greek grammar, and soon made considerable progress. I first read the New Testament almost throughout; then the Iliad of Homer, not omitting a line nor leaving a word obscure; then part of the Odyssey, which was recalled before I could finish it.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Lutton      Print: Book

  

John Adams : The History of Rome, from the Foundation of the Ci

My father's large bookcase was stuffed with odd volumes of the Gentleman's Magazine and other miscellaneous matters. Anacharsis' 'travels in Greece', Robertson's 'America', Goldsmith's 'History of England', Adams' 'Rome', Wesley's sermons and Fletcher's controversial volumes. All these had been read by me, either for my own amusement, or aloud to my father, whose sight had been lost for years.

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Lutton      Print: Book

  

J.J. Barthelemy : Travels of Anacharsis the Younger in Greece,

My father's large bookcase was stuffed with odd volumes of the Gentleman's Magazine and other miscellaneous matters. Anacharsis' 'travels in Greece', Robertson's 'America', Goldsmith's 'History of England', Adams' 'Rome', Wesley's sermons and Fletcher's controversial volumes. All these had been read by me, either for my own amusement, or aloud to my father, whose sight had been lost for years.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Lutton      Print: Book

  

Oliver Goldsmith : The History of England from the Earliest Times...

My father's large bookcase was stuffed with odd volumes of the Gentleman's Magazine and other miscellaneous matters. Anacharsis' 'travels in Greece', Robertson's 'America', Goldsmith's 'History of England', Adams' 'Rome', Wesley's sermons and Fletcher's controversial volumes. All these had been read by me, either for my own amusement, or aloud to my father, whose sight had been lost for years.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Lutton      Print: Book

  

Alice Thompson : unknown poems

How the young Alice Meynell gained her family's support for her writing: ' ... [in c. 1867 Alice Thompson] had shown ... [her poems] to an American friend of the family, who had read them to Mr Thompson [her father] ...'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Thompson      Manuscript: Unknown

  

John Masefield : [unknown]

[A Sheffield Survey organised by Arnold Freeman in 1918, assessing 816 manual workers, gives the following case:] 'Engine tenter, age twenty-seven...Often attends operas...Methodically building up a personal library following the guidelines of Arnold Bennett's Literary Taste. Has read the Bible, Shakespeare (The Merchant of Venice, Julius Caesar, The Tempest, Much Ado about Nothing), Pope, Tennyson, Masefield, Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Emerson, William Morris, most of Ruskin, Dickens (Nicholas Nickleby, David Copperfield, Oliver Twist, A Tale of Two Cities, The Old Curiosity Shop, A Christmas Carol), The Cloister and the Hearth, GK Chesterton, Bernard Shaw (Major Barbara, John Bull's Other Island, The Doctor's Dilemma, Man and Superman, The Shewing up of Blanco Posnet, The Devil's Disciple, You Never Can Tell, Socialism and Superior Brains, Fabian Essays, An Unsocial Socialist, The Irrational Knot), John Galsworthy, about a dozen books by H.G. Wells and perhaps twenty by Bennett, Sidney and Beatrice Webb's Industrial Democracy and other books on trade unionism, Sir Oliver Lodge, Edward Carpenter's Towards Democracy and The Intermediate Sex, J.A. Hobson and Alfred Marshall on Economics and Plato's Republic'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: questionaire respondent      Print: Book

  

Ralph Waldo Emerson : [unknown]

[A Sheffield Survey organised by Arnold Freeman in 1918, assessing 816 manual workers, gives the following case:] 'Engine tenter, age twenty-seven...Often attends operas...Methodically building up a personal library following the guidelines of Arnold Bennett's Literary Taste. Has read the Bible, Shakespeare (The Merchant of Venice, Julius Caesar, The Tempest, Much Ado about Nothing), Pope, Tennyson, Masefield, Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Emerson, William Morris, most of Ruskin, Dickens (Nicholas Nickleby, David Copperfield, Oliver Twist, A Tale of Two Cities, The Old Curiosity Shop, A Christmas Carol), The Cloister and the Hearth, GK Chesterton, Bernard Shaw (Major Barbara, John Bull's Other Island, The Doctor's Dilemma, Man and Superman, The Shewing up of Blanco Posnet, The Devil's Disciple, You Never Can Tell, Socialism and Superior Brains, Fabian Essays, An Unsocial Socialist, The Irrational Knot), John Galsworthy, about a dozen books by H.G. Wells and perhaps twenty by Bennett, Sidney and Beatrice Webb's Industrial Democracy and other books on trade unionism, Sir Oliver Lodge, Edward Carpenter's Towards Democracy and The Intermediate Sex, J.A. Hobson and Alfred Marshall on Economics and Plato's Republic'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: questionaire respondent      Print: Book

  

Alfred Marshall : [unknown]

[A Sheffield Survey organised by Arnold Freeman in 1918, assessing 816 manual workers, gives the following case:] 'Engine tenter, age twenty-seven...Often attends operas...Methodically building up a personal library following the guidelines of Arnold Bennett's Literary Taste. Has read the Bible, Shakespeare (The Merchant of Venice, Julius Caesar, The Tempest, Much Ado about Nothing), Pope, Tennyson, Masefield, Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Emerson, William Morris, most of Ruskin, Dickens (Nicholas Nickleby, David Copperfield, Oliver Twist, A Tale of Two Cities, The Old Curiosity Shop, A Christmas Carol), The Cloister and the Hearth, GK Chesterton, Bernard Shaw (Major Barbara, John Bull's Other Island, The Doctor's Dilemma, Man and Superman, The Shewing up of Blanco Posnet, The Devil's Disciple, You Never Can Tell, Socialism and Superior Brains, Fabian Essays, An Unsocial Socialist, The Irrational Knot), John Galsworthy, about a dozen books by H.G. Wells and perhaps twenty by Bennett, Sidney and Beatrice Webb's Industrial Democracy and other books on trade unionism, Sir Oliver Lodge, Edward Carpenter's Towards Democracy and The Intermediate Sex, J.A. Hobson and Alfred Marshall on Economics and Plato's Republic'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: questionaire respondent      Print: Book

  

Richard Doddridge Blackmore : Lorna Doone

[analysis of a female respondent in Arnold Freeman's 1918 Sheffield Survey] 'Housewife, age twenty-eight... Has read "David Copperfield", "The Old Curiosity Shop", "Lorna Doone", Louisa May Alcott and the travels of Livingstone and Darwin'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: questionaire respondent      Print: Book

  

William Morris : [unknown]

[analysis of a female respondent in Arnold Freeman's 1918 Sheffield Survey] 'Cutlery worker, age seventy-two...Fond of Longfellow, Stevenson, Ruskin, William Morris and Charles Dickens'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: questionaire respondent      Print: Book

  

George Moore : A Mummer's Wife

'Harry Dorrell read his brother's copy of George Moore's "A Mummer's Wife", but "I could not understand wny the lady who was undressed said to the man 'Bite me' and also got into bed with no clothes on. Mother always wore a nightdress in bed".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Harry Dorrell      Print: Book

  

George Meredith : Novels

'... Helena Swanwick recalled one exception from among the succession of inadequate domestic servants who passed through her household in the 1890s: "The best I had in those years was a young Welshwoman, who read the novels of Meredith ... and enjoyed them ..."'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon [servant of Helena Swanwick]      Print: Book

  

Charles Lamb : [unknown]

'Theodore Watts-Dunton remembers Algernon Swinburne's fondness for reading aloud during his last years at Watts-Dunton's home: "... he would read for the hour together from Dickens, Lamb, Charles Reade and Thackeray."'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Algernon Swinburne      Print: Unknown

  

William Morris : The Haystack in the Floods (and other poems)

'When Wilfrid Blunt joined [William] Morris and his daughter at Kelmscott in 1891, Morris "read us out several of his poems ... including The Haystack in the Floods, but his reading is without the graces of elocution."'

Unknown
Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: William Morris      

  

Peter Cunningham : Lives of the most Eminent Booksellers: Jacob Tonson

[Annotation NOT in Cunningham's hand (unidentified)]: above the sentence 'Jacob Tonson is the first bookseller of any note we can treat of': 'bio. Prin & Shepherd'.

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: Anon      Manuscript: Pamphlet

  

George Meredith : Modern Love

'At one poetical evening [at Wilfrid Blunt's home Crabbet Park], when the guests included A. E. Housman and Desmond MacCarthy ... Wilfrid [Meynell] was requested to read George Meredith's Modern Love. This he did, with running commentary ...'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Wilfrid Meynell      Print: Book

  

George MacDonald : The Princess and the Goblin

'Elinor Glyn recalled "The Princess and the Goblin" (1872) being read to her as a child ...'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Elinor Glyn      Print: Book

  

Oliver Goldsmith : The Vicar of Wakefield

Letter 8/2/1863 - "For, as far as I remember - my sayings to you have been very nearly limited to Goldsmith's model of a critical sentence on painter's work: "that it was very well - and would have been better if the painter had taken more pains."

Unknown
Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      

  

Oliver Goldsmith : The Vicar of Wakefield

Letter 8/2/1863 - "I'm afraid to speak like the wicked girl in the fairy tale - who let - not pearls fall from her lips."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

Ralph Waldo Emerson : unknown

Constance Smedley on readings in American literature: 'Thoreau ... opened the door to a philosophy of life when I was about fifteen ... in his train came Emerson and Lowell ...'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Constance Smedley      Print: Book

  

Charlotte Smith : Emmeline

" Finished reading that Emmeline, a Trumpery novel in four volumes. If I can answer for myself I will never again undertake such a tiresome nonsensical piece of business."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Eleanor Butler      Print: Book

  

Madame de Maintenon : Les Memoires de Madame de Maintenon

" Began Les Memoires de Madame Maintenon. I doubt whether the vulgarity of stile (sic), absurd anecdotes and impertinent reflections will permit me to read it."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Eleanor Butler      Print: Book

  

Madame de Maintenon : Les Memoires de Madame de Maintenon

" Nine till twelve in the Dressing room reading-finished Les Memoires de Maintenon. Began her letters"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Eleanor Butler      Print: Book

  

Madame de Metterniche : Memoires

Listed under "Books read since April the first 1789"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Eleanor Butler      Print: Book

  

Jean Baptiste Poquelin Moliere : 

Listed under "Books read since April the first 1789"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Eleanor Butler      Print: Book

  

Pietro Metastasio : opera (16 Tom)

Listed under "Books read since April the first 1789"

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Eleanor Butler      Print: Book

  

Henry James : What Maisie Knew

' ... in Egypt during the Great War [E. M.] Forster applied himself to read [Henry] James. Struggling with What Maisie Knew (1897), he rather thought that "she is my very limit ..."'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Edward Morgan Forster      Print: Book

  

John Milton : unknown

'Lloyd George, the Chancellor of the Exchequer ... liked to get away from political anxieties by devouring what he called "shilling shockers": adventure stories, American westerns, and thrillers, though he would occasionally leaven the mixture by rereading Dickens and what he considered the erotic passages of Byron, Milton and Burns. He did latch on to some best-sellers, such as Jeffrey Farnol's The Amateur Gentleman (1913), which he read "over and over again" ...'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Lloyd George      Print: Book

  

Tobias Smollett : [unknown]

'On learning that [Hall] Caine was to present twenty-four lectures in Liverpool on "Prose Fiction" ... [D. G. Rossetti] insisted that he read the works [of English novelists] aloud to him; hence "I read Fielding and Smollett, Richardson, Radcliffe, 'Monk' Lewis, Thackeray and Dickens, under a running fire of comment and criticism from Rossetti".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Hall Caine      Print: Book

  

Dutch Ambassador : [a speech]

"Back I went by Mr. Downing's order, and stayed there til 12 o'clock in expectation of one to come to read some writings, but he came not, so I stayed all alone reading the answer of the Dutch ambassador to our State, in which answer to the reasons of my lord's coming home which he gave for his coming, and did labour herein to contradict my Lord's arguments for his coming home."

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Manuscript: Letter

  

Oliver Wendell Holmes : 

"I took in Mr Holmes' humorous poems & Davidson (a very jolly little friend of mine) another light work & we sat together with Romer in the furthest corner enjoying literature mixed with 'light conversation' after your style."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Leslie Stephen      Print: Book

  

John Addington Symonds : Life of Symonds

'I have been reading the life of Mr Symonds, and it makes me almost laugh (though little laughing is in my heart) to think of the strange difference between this prosaic little narrative, all about the facts of a life so simple as mine, and his elaborate self-discussions'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Oliphant      Print: Book

  

Robert Macpherson : 

'Robert Macpherson came down with us to Civita Vecchia to see us off, and, I remember, read to me all the way there a story he had written, one of the stories flying about Rome of one of the great families, which he wanted me to polish up and get published for him.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Macpherson      Manuscript: Sheet

  

George Barnett Smith : The Works of Thackeray

"I think that Miss Thackeray and my wife have expressed to you their great pleasure in your article on their father."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Stephen      Print: Serial / periodical

  

George Barnett Smith : The Works of Thackeray

"I think that Miss Thackeray and my wife have expressed to you their great pleasure in your article on their father."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Ann Thackeray      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Frederick Denison Maurice : 

"By an accidental combination of circumstances I only saw your article on my 'secularism' this afternoon. I have no complaints to make of it & no wish to carry on the controversy. But I do wish (for I value highly your good opinion on moral character & respect all your opinions) to acquit myself from one or two charges of unfairness to Mr Maurice."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Leslie Stephen      Print: Book

  

Frederick Denison Maurice : 

"Excuse all this; but though you may not easily give me credit I really admired Mr Maurice; I attended his lectures as a boy; I studied his books carefully & I should be sorry that you think of my errors as caused by carelessness or undue superciliousness. They are at least the outcome of a good deal of as conscientious thinking as I can give."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Leslie Stephen      Print: Book

  

John Milton : 

I always have a profound impression that human beings have been much more like each other than we fancy since they got rid of their tails & that the great outbursts of speculation or art imply some special excitement more than a radical difference in people themselves. I have even a belief that if Browning had lived 200 years ago he would have been a small Shakespeare & perhaps Tennyson a second rate Milton, though I agree that poor old Alfred has not quite the stuff in him.

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Leslie Stephen      Print: Book

  

A.B. Jameson : Legends of the Saints

'The table is heaped with picture-books, and Maggie, rather sentimental with a bad cold, is reading Mrs. Jameson's Legends of the Saints, so there you have a peep at our interior.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Maggie Oliphant      Print: Book

  

Edward Morike : Erinerung - an C.N.

'It made me think of a poem that our german professor used to read us in class. Ja, das war zum letzenmal/ Das, wir beide, arm in arme/ unter einem Schirm gebogen. --/ Alles war zum letzenmal'

Unknown
Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Katherine Mansfield      

  

John Middleton Murry : The Loneliness of Leon Bloy

'I got up at that moment to re-read your article on Leon Bloy. The memory of it suddenly rose in my mind, like a scent'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Katherine Mansfield      Print: Newspaper

  

John Middleton Murry : The Loneliness of Leon Bloy

'I got up at that moment to re-read your article on Leon Bloy. The memory of it suddenly rose in my mind, like a scent'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Katherine Mansfield      Print: Newspaper

  

George Meredith : Lord Ormont and his Aminta

"[George] Meredtih's penultimate novel, Lord Ormont and his Aminta (1894), was, [Henry] James told Edmund Gosse [in letter of 22 August 1894], 'unspeakable' ... he could proceed only at 'the maximum rate of ten pages -- ten insufferable and unprofitable pages, a day'."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Book

  

George Meredith : The Egoist

'[R. L. Stevenson] ... nominated ["The Egoist"], together with a couple of Scott's novels, a Dumas, Shakespeare, Montaigne, and Moliere, as one of that handful of books which ... he read repeatedly -- four or five times in the case of "The Egoist", he declared in 1887.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Louis Stevenson      Print: Book

  

Alexandre Dumas : [novel]

'[R. L. Stevenson] ... nominated ["The Egoist"], together with a couple of Scott's novels, a Dumas, Shakespeare, Montaigne, and Moliere, as one of that handful of books which ... he read repeatedly -- four or five times in the case of "The Egoist", he declared in 1887.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Louis Stevenson      Print: Book

  

Michel de Montaigne : [unknown]

'[R. L. Stevenson] ... nominated ["The Egoist"], together with a couple of Scott's novels, a Dumas, Shakespeare, Montaigne, and Moliere, as one of that handful of books which ... he read repeatedly -- four or five times in the case of "The Egoist", he declared in 1887.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Louis Stevenson      Print: Book

  

Moliere [pseud] : [unknown]

'[R. L. Stevenson] ... nominated ["The Egoist"], together with a couple of Scott's novels, a Dumas, Shakespeare, Montaigne, and Moliere, as one of that handful of books which ... he read repeatedly -- four or five times in the case of "The Egoist", he declared in 1887.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Louis Stevenson      Print: Book

  

George Meredith : Modern Love

"[Wilfrid Scawen] Blunt was a great admirer of [Meredith's] Modern Love and, though he only read it thirty years after its publication when Meredith sent him a copy in 1892, Blunt was accused of plagiarising it in his own Songs of Proteus (1884)."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Wilfrid Scawen Blunt      Print: Book

  

Henry James : Confidence

'I bought a book by Henry James yesterday and read it, as they say, "until far into the night". It was not very interesting or very good, but I can wade through pages and pages of dull, turgid James for the sake of that sudden sweet shock, that violent throb of delight that he gives me at times. I don't doubt this is genius: only there is an extraordinary amount of pan and an amazingly raffine' flash - '

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Katherine Mansfield      Print: Book

  

George Meredith : The Egoist

"Lady Cynthia Asquith ... believed [as she recorded in her diary] that 'Meredith is very good for reading aloud.' On 10 March 1916 she tested this proposition by reading 'Mamma [Countess Wemyss] two chapters of The Egoist after dinner: she fell asleep'."

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Cynthia Asquith      Print: Book

  

George Meredith : poem

"... Lady Cynthia [Asquith] was gratified to learn that, found in his pocket when Billy Grenfell was killed in battle in 1915 was a Meredith poem, copied out for him by his mother, Lady Desborough."

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Desborough      

  

George Meredith : The Egoist

"At the age of 18 Violet Asquith ... tackled The Egoist, which 'I thought brilliant. The first 3 pages made me so angry by their obscureness ... that I nearly left off ... but I possessed myself with patience & loved the rest....'"

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Violet Asquith      Print: Book

  

William Temple : Miscellanea

' "When all is done human life is at its greatest and best but a little froward [sic] child to be played with, and humoured a little, to keep it quiet until it falls asleep, and then the care is over" (Temple) That's the sort of strain - not for what it says and means, but for the "lilt" of it - that sets me writing.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Katherine Mansfield      Print: Book

  

Octave Mirbeau : 

'I have read - given way to reading - two books by Octave Mirbeau - and after them I see dreadfully and finally, (1) that the French are a filthy people, (2) that their corruption is so puante [stinking] - I'll never go near 'em again.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Katherine Mansfield      Print: Book

  

Octave Mirbeau : 

'I have read - given way to reading - two books by Octave Mirbeau - and after them I see dreadfully and finally, (1) that the French are a filthy people, (2) that their corruption is so puante [stinking] - I'll never go near 'em again.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Katherine Mansfield      Print: Book

  

Tobias Smollett : [unknown]

'Britain was a mainly urban society...and soon an expanding range of sexual literature became available in the cities. Mark Grossek, the son of a Jewish immigrant tailor in Southwark, acquired his knowledge from grafitti, scandalous stories in the local press, 'Lloyd's Weekly News', 'Measure for Measure', the Song of Solomon, some old plays a fellow student had dug out of his father's library, General Booth's 'In Darkest England', Tobias Smollett, Quain's 'Dictionary of Medicine', as well as Leviticus ("For myself, the most subtle aura of enticement was wafted from the verb 'begat' and the noun 'concubine'"). There was also Ovid, but unfortunately the popular translation published by Bohn "had left all the tasty chunks in Latin".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Mark Grossek      Print: Book

  

William Morris : The Defence of Guenevere

Letter H.96 (Beginning of June 1861) ?The Defence of Guenevere by Morris is published by Bell & Daldy.?

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

Homer : Odyssey

Letter H. 114. Postmark 15 May 1863 Referring to a picture of Helen of Troy: ?She is the sweetest character in all Homer ? and the true heroine ? even of the Odyssey ? (not to speak of the second Part of Faust).

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

Homer : Iliad

Letter H. 114. Postmark 15 May 1863 Referring to a picture of Helen of Troy: ?She is the sweetest character in all Homer ? and the true heroine ? even of the Odyssey ? (not to speak of the second Part of Faust).

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ruskin      Print: Book

  

Omar Khayyam : 

"I have read, too, or repeated, for I know him by heart, our old friend Omar Khyyam. He is grand in his way & if spiritualised a little, strikes a right note at times but he needs to be a little spiritualised. Yet honestly, literature & religion are rather empty. The only thing is living affection & of that I have had most touching experience."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Leslie Stephen      Print: Book

  

George Moore : Esther Waters

George Gissing, diary entry for 9 December 1894: 'Gloomy day. Read "Esther Waters". Some pathos and power in latter part, but miserable writing.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gissing      Print: Book

  

Henry James : The Saloon

'"Why do you want to break men's spirits for?" Shaw asked Henry James after reading his one-act play "The Saloon" in 1909.'

Unknown
Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: George Bernard Shaw      

  

John Henry Newman : Loss and Gain

'When Wilfrid Blunt ... reread "Loss and Gain" he was struck how "Newman's mind ... seems never to have faced the real issues of belief and unbelief, those which have to be fought out with materialism ..."'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Wilfrid Scawen Blunt      Print: Book

  

John Morley : On Compromise

"Morley has just published a book on 'Compromise'; out of the Fortnightly. I think his writing improves. It seems to me good & dignified without being too much like a sermon."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Leslie Stephen      Print: Book

  

Milner : Ecclesiastical History

'The books which I am at present employed in reading to myself are in English, Plutarch's Lives and Milner's Ecclesiastical History'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Homer : The Odyssey

In my learning I do Xenophon every day and twice a week the Odyssey, in which I am classed with Wilberforce.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Sir Oliver Wendell Holmes : The Poet at the Breakfast Table

We have all read, by the way, The Poet at the breakfast table & sent him our sincere compliments on his performance."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Leslie Stephen      Print: Book

  

Christopher Marlowe : Hero and Leander

" But, when I was nearly sixteen, I made a purchase which brought me into sad trouble, and was the cause of a permanent wound to myself-respect. I had long coveted in the book-shop window a volume in which the poetical works of Ben Jonson and Christopher Marlowe were said to be combined.This I bought at length, and I carried it with me to devour as I trod the desolate road that brought me along the edge of the cliff on Saturday afternoons. Ben Jonson I could make nothing of, but when I turned to 'Hero and Leander' I was lifted to a heaven of passion and music. It was a marvellous revelation of romantic beauty to me, and as paced along that lonely and exquisite highway, with its immense command of the sea, and its peeps ever now and then, through slanting thickets, far down to the snow-white shingle, I lifted up my voice, singing the verses, as I strolled along..[quote]so it wenton, and I thought I had never read anything so lovely...[quote]it all seemed to my fancy intoxicating beyond anything I had ever even dreamed of, since I had not yet become aquainted with any of the modern romanticists."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Edmund Gosse      Print: Book

  

Christopher Marlowe : Hero and Leander

" When I reached home, tired out with enthusiasm and exercise, I must needs, so soon as I had eaten, search out my stepmother that she might be a partner in my joys. It is remarkable to me now, and a disconcerting proof of my still almost infantile innocence, that, having induced her to settle to her knitting, I began, without hesitation, to read Marlowe's voluptuous poem aloud to that blameless Christian gentlewoman. We got on very well in the opening, but at the episode of Cupid's pining, my stepmother's needles began nervously to clash, and when we launched on the description of Leander's person, she interruptedme by saying, rather sharply, 'give me that book, please, I should like to read the rest to myself.' I resigned the reading in amazement, and was stupefied to see her take the volume, shut it with a snap and hide it under her needlework. Nor could I extract from her another word on the subject." [Gosse goes on to tell how his Father told him off, and burned the book]

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Edmund Gosse      Print: Book

  

William James : The varieties of religious experience

"I have read your book with keen interest. I always read you with the pleasure of a literary critic recognising (and envying) mastery in the art of putting things."

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Leslie Stephen      Print: Book

  

G. B. Smith : The Brontes

'The hero seems to me superior to the Rochester or the Louis Moore type, who are all rather lay-figures. Nor do I admire the sister?s work [Wuthering Heights] so much as you do. I see in it more violence than real strength & more rant than genuine passion. However all this is a matter of taste. I will remark, by the way, that I think there is some excuse for the charge of coarseness, as, e.g., the scene where Jane Eyre is half inclined to go to Rochester?s bedroom. I don?t mean coarseness in the sense of prurience; for I fully agree that Miss Bronte writes as a thoroughly pureminded woman; but she is more close to the physical side of passion than young ladies are expected to be?There is also some coarseness in the artistic sense in Jane Eyre. The mad wife is I fancy, unnecessarily bestial? I don?t think justice is generally done to C Bronte now & I shall be glad for that reason to insert your eloquent article.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Leslie Stephen      Manuscript: article

  

John Henry Newman : An essay in aid of a grammar of assent

'I finished old Newman?s book coming down & as the book is too metaphysical to give you pleasure I will tell you what it comes to, it is an elaborate apology for the morality of persuading yourself that a thing is absolutely certain when you really know that it is not certain at all? Why shouldn?t I say that such a creature is a liar & that I despise him? I do most heartily.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Leslie Stephen      Print: Book

  

F. W. Maitland : History of English Law

?I have read two books lately wh. interested me. One for wh. you will not care is a history of English law down to the time of Edward I by F. W. Maitland? It is a wonderful piece of work as far as I can judge; & I should ask you to recommend it to some of your law professors, only that, as I take it, they will know about it already.?

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Leslie Stephen      Print: Book

  

F W Maitland : History of English Law

?I have read your history; and when I say ?read? I mean that I have turned over the pages and read all such parts as were apparently on a level with my comprehension?I found a great deal that interested me very much. ?I could only read, as a rule, in all humility accompanied by constant admiration.?

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Leslie Stephen      Print: Book

  

Elizabeth Hamilton : The Cottages of Glenburnie

"This minute I hear a carman is going to Navan, and I hasten to send you the Cottagers of Glenburnie, which I hope you will like as well as I do. I think it will do a vast deal of good to you, and besides it is extremely interesting, which all good books are not: it has great powers, both comic and tragic."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Maria Edgeworth      Print: Book

  

Richard Cumberland : Arundel

?Cumberland attempted and failed to revive the classical English novel. We sit down in fact by Cumberlands? fireside and listen to his long dull stories as we would to the tales of a garrulous, good tempered, prosing old man, pleased with him sometimes for occasional amusement, and pleased with ourselves for our patience and charity.?

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Robert Maturin      Print: Book

  

Hannah More : Coelebs in search of a wife

??the work of Mrs Hannah More called Coelebs in search of a wife, as not knowing well where to class it. It is too pure and too profound to be ranked with novels, and too sprightly and entertaining to be wholly given up to philosophy, theology or dialectics. Mrs More?s works form a class of themselves; it is enough, perhaps, to say Coelebs is one of them.?

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Robert Maturin      Print: Book

  

Charlotte Smith : The Old Manor House

?The transition from the vapid sentimentality of the novel of fifty years ago to the goblin horrors of the last twenty is so strong that it almost puzzles us to find a connecting link? Perhaps Charlotte Smith?s novels might have been the connecting link between these different species. ?The Old Manor House has really a great deal to answer for? Her heroines have all the requisites of persecuted innocence? The rage for lumbering ruins, for mildewed manuscripts.?

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Maturin      Print: Book

  

Charles-Louis Montesquieu : Causes de la grandeur des Romains et de leur decadence

?I have been reading a power of good books; Montesquieu Sur la grandeur and d?cadence des Romains, which I recommend to you as a book you will admire, because it furnishes so much food for thought, it shows how history may be studied for the advantage of mankind, not for the mere purpose of remembering facts and reporting them.?

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Maria Edgeworth      Print: Book

  

Thomas More : Utopia

The seventeenth-century waterman-poet John Taylor had read More's Utopia, Plato's Republic, Montaigne, and Cervantes in translation, but he never mastered a foreign language and he relentlessly satirised latinate prose: I ne'er used Accidence so much as now, Nor all these Latin words here interlaced I do not know if they with sense are placed, I in the book did find them".'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: John Taylor      Print: Book

  

Michel Eyquem de Montaigne : Essays

The seventeenth-century waterman-poet John Taylor had read More's Utopia, Plato's Republic, Montaigne, and Cervantes in translation, but he never mastered a foreign language and he relentlessly satirised latinate prose: I ne'er used Accidence so much as now, Nor all these Latin words here interlaced I do not know if they with sense are placed, I in the book did find them".'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: John Taylor      Print: Book

  

Guy de Maupassant : 

The parents of playwright Arnold Wesker were both immigrants, tailor's machinists, Communists and culturally Jewish atheists. Wesker admitted he was "a very bad student", but his parents provided an environment of "constant ideological discussion at home, argument and disputation all the time... it was the common currency of day-to-day living that ideas were discussed around the table, and it was taken for granted that there were books in the house and that we would read". The books mostly had a leftward slant (Tolstoy, Gorky, Jack London, Sinclair Lewis) but Wesker soon reached out to Balzac, Maupassant and a broader raange of literature'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Arnold Wesker      Print: Book

  

Thomas Moore : Complete Poems and Songs

??Moore, who is a poet of inspiration, could write in any circumstances. There is no man of the age labours harder than Moore. He is often a month working out the end of an epigram. Moore is a writer for whom I feel a strong affection, because he has done that which I would have done if I could; but after him it would be vain to try anything.??

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Robert Maturin      Print: Book

  

Francis Thompson : 

'While his widowed mother... worked a market stall, Ralph Finn scrambled up the scholarship ladder to Oxford University. He credited his success largely to his English master at Davenant Foundation School: "When I was an East End boy searching for beauty, hardly knowing what I was searching for, fighting against all sorts of bad beginnings and unrewarding examples, he more than anyone taught me to love our tremndous heritage of English language and literature". And Finnn never doubted that it was HIS heritage: "My friends and companions Tennyson, Browning, Keats, Shakespeare, Francis Thompson, Donne, Housman, the Rosettis. All as alive to me as thought they had been members of my family". After all, as he was surprised and pleased to discover, F.T. Palgrave (whose Golden Treasury he knew thoroughly) was part-Jewish'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Ralph Finn      Print: Book

  

Alfred Edward Housman : 

'While his widowed mother... worked a market stall, Ralph Finn scrambled up the scholarship ladder to Oxford University. He credited his success largely to his English master at Davenant Foundation School: "When I was an East End boy searching for beauty, hardly knowing what I was searching for, fighting against all sorts of bad beginnings and unrewarding examples, he more than anyone taught me to love our tremndous heritage of English language and literature". And Finnn never doubted that it was HIS heritage: "My friends and companions Tennyson, Browning, Keats, Shakespeare, Francis Thompson, Donne, Housman, the Rosettis. All as alive to me as thought they had been members of my family". After all, as he was surprised and pleased to discover, F.T. Palgrave (whose Golden Treasury he knew thoroughly) was part-Jewish'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Ralph Finn      Print: Book

  

Karl Marx : 

[Bill Naughton was hurt that when he applied for conscientious objector status the tribunal was suspicious of his elevated vocabulary] '"I couldn't help feeling hurt", Naughton recalled, "that they should deny one the right to use the English language". That hit both ethnic and class nerves: he had been born in County Mayo of peasant stock. At any rate, he was using the language to read Locke, Nietzsche, Thoreau, Schopenhauer, Marx and The Faerie Queene. They were not easy to decipher at first, but as he pieced together an understanding of what he was reading, he became more critical and less deferential...'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Bill Naughton      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : The History of England from the Accession of James II

[D.R. Davies was inspired by his school teacher] 'to read Macaulay's History of England before his twelfth birthday'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: D.R. Davies      Print: Book

  

Charles Lamb : 

'[Davies said] "Before I was twelve I had developed an appreciation of good prose, and the Bible created in me a zest for literature", propelling him directly to Lamb, Hazlitt's Essays and Ruskin's The Crown of Wild Olives. Later... he joined the library committee of the Miners' Institute in Maesteg, made friends with the librarian, and advised him on acquisitions. Thus he could read all the books he wanted: Marx, Smith, Ricardo, Mill, Marshall, economic and trade union history, Fabian Essays, Thomas Hardy, Meredith, Kipling and Dickens'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: D.R. Davies      Print: Book

  

Karl Marx : 

'[Davies said] "Before I was twelve I had developed an appreciation of good prose, and the Bible created in me a zest for literature", propelling him directly to Lamb, Hazlitt's Essays and Ruskin's The Crown of Wild Olives. Later... he joined the library committee of the Miners' Institute in Maesteg, made friends with the librarian, and advised him on acquisitions. Thus he could read all the books he wanted: Marx, Smith, Ricardo, Mill, Marshall, economic and trade union history, Fabian Essays, Thomas Hardy, Meredith, Kipling and Dickens'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: D.R. Davies      Print: Book

  

Adam Smith : 

'[Davies said] "Before I was twelve I had developed an appreciation of good prose, and the Bible created in me a zest for literature", propelling him directly to Lamb, Hazlitt's Essays and Ruskin's The Crown of Wild Olives. Later... he joined the library committee of the Miners' Institute in Maesteg, made friends with the librarian, and advised him on acquisitions. Thus he could read all the books he wanted: Marx, Smith, Ricardo, Mill, Marshall, economic and trade union history, Fabian Essays, Thomas Hardy, Meredith, Kipling and Dickens'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: D.R. Davies      Print: Book

  

John Stuart Mill : 

'[Davies said] "Before I was twelve I had developed an appreciation of good prose, and the Bible created in me a zest for literature", propelling him directly to Lamb, Hazlitt's Essays and Ruskin's The Crown of Wild Olives. Later... he joined the library committee of the Miners' Institute in Maesteg, made friends with the librarian, and advised him on acquisitions. Thus he could read all the books he wanted: Marx, Smith, Ricardo, Mill, Marshall, economic and trade union history, Fabian Essays, Thomas Hardy, Meredith, Kipling and Dickens'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: D.R. Davies      Print: Book

  

Alfred Marshall : 

'[Davies said] "Before I was twelve I had developed an appreciation of good prose, and the Bible created in me a zest for literature", propelling him directly to Lamb, Hazlitt's Essays and Ruskin's The Crown of Wild Olives. Later... he joined the library committee of the Miners' Institute in Maesteg, made friends with the librarian, and advised him on acquisitions. Thus he could read all the books he wanted: Marx, Smith, Ricardo, Mill, Marshall, economic and trade union history, Fabian Essays, Thomas Hardy, Meredith, Kipling and Dickens'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: D.R. Davies      Print: Book

  

George Meredith : 

'[Davies said] "Before I was twelve I had developed an appreciation of good prose, and the Bible created in me a zest for literature", propelling him directly to Lamb, Hazlitt's Essays and Ruskin's The Crown of Wild Olives. Later... he joined the library committee of the Miners' Institute in Maesteg, made friends with the librarian, and advised him on acquisitions. Thus he could read all the books he wanted: Marx, Smith, Ricardo, Mill, Marshall, economic and trade union history, Fabian Essays, Thomas Hardy, Meredith, Kipling and Dickens'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: D.R. Davies      Print: Book

  

Charlotte Smith : Minor Morals: interspersed with sketches of National history and historical anecdotes and original stories

?Have you seen Minor Morals by Mrs Smith ? There is in it a beautiful botanical poem called ?Calendar of Flora?.?

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Maria Edgeworth      Print: Book

  

Stephanie Felicite de Genlis (Comtesse) : Mademoiselle de Clermont

?We saw today the residence of the Prince de Cond? - and of a long line of princes famous for virtue and talents ? the celebrated palace of Chantilly, made still more interesting to us by having just read the beautiful tale by Madame de Genlis ?Mademoiselle de Clermont?; it would delight my dear Aunt Mary, it is to be had in the first volume of the Petits Romans??

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Maria Edgeworth      Print: Book

  

M R Milford : 

8/1/1827 ? ?Finished M. R. Milford?s pretty book, and write out my new fable.?

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Amelia Opie      Print: Book

  

Tobias Smollett : 

'As a collier [Joseph Keating]... heard a co-worker sigh, "Heaven from all creatures hides the book of fate". Keating was stunned: "You are quoting Pope". "Ayh", replied his companion, "me and Pope do agree very well". Keating had himself been reading Pope, Fielding, Smollett, Goldsmith and Richardson in poorly printed paperbacks. Later he was reassigned to a less demanding job at a riverside colliery pumping station, which allowed him time to tackle Swift, Sheridan, Byron, Keats, Shelley and Thackeray'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Keating      Print: Book

  

Oliver Goldsmith : 

'As a collier [Joseph Keating]... heard a co-worker sigh, "Heaven from all creatures hides the book of fate". Keating was stunned: "You are quoting Pope". "Ayh", replied his companion, "me and Pope do agree very well". Keating had himself been reading Pope, Fielding, Smollett, Goldsmith and Richardson in poorly printed paperbacks. Later he was reassigned to a less demanding job at a riverside colliery pumping station, which allowed him time to tackle Swift, Sheridan, Byron, Keats, Shelley and Thackeray'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Keating      Print: Book

  

Charles Lamb : 

'Nottinghamshire collier G.A.W. Tomlinson volunteered for repair shifts on weekends, when he could earn time-and-a-half and read on the job. On Sundays, "I sat there on my toolbox, half a mile from the surface, one mile from the nearest church and seemingly hundreds of miles from God, reading the Canterbury Tales, Lamb's Essays, Darwin's Origin of Species, Wilde's Ballad of Reading Gaol, or anything that I could manage to get hold of". That could be hazardous: once, when he should have been minding a set of rail switches, he was so absorbed in Goldsmith's The Deserted Village that he allowed tubs full of coal to crash into empties'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: G.A.W. Tomlinson      Print: Book

  

Oliver Goldsmith : The Deserted Village

'Nottinghamshire collier G.A.W. Tomlinson volunteered for repair shifts on weekends, when he could earn time-and-a-half and read on the job. On Sundays, "I sat there on my toolbox, half a mile from the surface, one mile from the nearest church and seemingly hundreds of miles from God, reading the Canterbury Tales, Lamb's Essays, Darwin's Origin of Species, Wilde's Ballad of Reading Gaol, or anything that I could manage to get hold of". That could be hazardous: once, when he should have been minding a set of rail switches, he was so absorbed in Goldsmith's The Deserted Village that he allowed tubs full of coal to crash into empties'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: G.A.W. Tomlinson      Print: Book

  

George Meredith : 

'Wil John Edwards...pursued Gibbon, Hardy, Swinburne and Meredith. His reading was suggested by the literary pages of the Clarion, the librarian at the Miners' Institute (who directed him to Don Quixote) and [guidance from fellow pit workers].'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Wil John Edwards      Print: Book

  

Karl Marx : 

'[During the Great Depression] "Thousands used the Public Library for the first time", recalled itinerant labourer John Brown, who read Shaw, Marx, Engels, and classic literature until he exhausted his South Shields library.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: John Brown      Print: Book

  

Karl Marx : 

'[Jack Ashley] was less prepared for Ruskin [College] than most of the students, having read only two books since leaving school: Jack London's The Iron Heel and the regulations of the Widnes Town Council. But principal Lionel Elvin "appreciated the profound dificulties facing working class students": "When I stumbled through the intricacies of the political theories of Marx, Hobbes, Rousseau, Locke and T.H. Green, he marked my work frankly yet gave encouragement... He was an excellent teacher, genuinely interested in discussing ideas and persuading students to express their own"

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Jack Ashley      Print: Book

  

Alfred Marshall : 

'Attending Oxford on a Cassel scholarship, John Allaway found that his WEA training, far from fitting him into a university mold, enabled him to criticize the conventional curriculum. Assigned the orthodox economics texts of Alfred Marshall, he read them "with deep suspicion" and made a point of going beyond the set books to study J.A. Hobson, Henry George, Hugh Dalton, and John Maynard Keynes'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: John Allaway      Print: Book

  

Karl Marx : Das Kapital

'For Dunfermline housepainter James Clunie, Das Kapital and the Wealth of Nations both demonstrated that industrialism inevitably increased economic inequality, the exploitation of labour and class conflict. To this The Descent of Man added "the great idea of human freedom... It brought out the idea that whether our children were with or without shoes was due to poverty arising from the administration of society".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: James Clunie      Print: Book

  

Adam Smith : Wealth of Nations

'For Dunfermline housepainter James Clunie, Das Kapital and the Wealth of Nations both demonstrated that industrialism inevitably increased economic inequality, the exploitation of labour and class conflict. To this The Descent of Man added "the great idea of human freedom... It brought out the idea that whether our children were with or without shoes was due to poverty arising from the administration of society".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: James Clunie      Print: Book

  

William McDougall : 

'Taxi driver Herbert Hodge...knew that years on the dole only produced apathy, and that out-of-work men wanted practical help in dealing with the Board of Guardians far more than ideology. That experience plus his eclectic reading (Bergson, Nietzsche, William McDougall, Bertrand Russell, the new Testament, and Herbert Spencer as well as Marx) led him out of the [Communist] Party towards a socialism that would be brought about by individual volition...'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Herbert Hodge      Print: Book

  

Karl Marx : 

'Taxi driver Herbert Hodge...knew that years on the dole only produced apathy, and that out-of-work men wanted practical help in dealing with the Board of Guardians far more than ideology. That experience plus his eclectic reading (Bergson, Nietzsche, William McDougall, Bertrand Russell, the new Testament, and Herbert Spencer as well as Marx) led him out of the [Communist] Party towards a socialism that would be brought about by individual volition...'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Herbert Hodge      Print: Book

  

Karl Marx : Das Kapital

'In 1925 Ifan Edwards was driven by unemployment to read Das Kapital in the public library. "It took him about four hundred pages of close print to come to the crux of his argument in the classic illustration of a labourer looking for a job in a factory, and, as he said, expecting nothing but a hiding", Edwards remembered. "This little aside appealed to me very much, as I had had one or two hidings myself".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Ifan Edwards      Print: Book

  

Karl Marx : Das Kapital

[George Scott disliked the Communism of fellow journalist, Stan] 'He had read Das Kapital (or parts of it) and could talk slickly about dialectical materialism. His own dialectic was derived from Straight and Crooked Thinking, a guide to identifying faulty logic, but he "enjoyed it because it taught him how to twist truth to his own ends...".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Stan (acquaintance of George Scott)      Print: Book

  

Alexandre Dumas (pere) : The Three Musketeers

'Next to Robinson Crusoe, Rider liked the Arabian Nights, The Three Musketeers and the poems of Edgar Allan Poe and Macaulay. His two favourite novels were Charles Dickens' Tale of Two Cities and The Coming Race, a fantasy novel by Bulwer Lytton (the uncle of Sir Henry Bulwer, a Norfolk neighbour and friend of Squire Haggard who was to play a decisive part in Rider's life).'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Rider Haggard      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : 

'Next to Robinson Crusoe, Rider liked the Arabian Nights, The Three Musketeers and the poems of Edgar Allan Poe and Macaulay. His two favourite novels were Charles Dickens' Tale of Two Cities and The Coming Race, a fantasy novel by Bulwer Lytton (the uncle of Sir Henry Bulwer, a Norfolk neighbour and friend of Squire Haggard who was to play a decisive part in Rider's life).'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Rider Haggard      Print: Book

  

Walt Whitman : 

'[Helen Crawfurd] derived lessons in socialism and feminism from Carlyle, Shaw, Wells, Galsworthy, Arnold Bennett, Ibsen's Ghosts and A Doll's House, Dickens, Disraeli's Sybil, Mary Barton, Jude the Obscure, Tess of the d'Urbervilles, Under the Greenwood Tree, Tennyson's The Princess, Longfellow, Whitman, Burns, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, George Eliot, George Sand, the Brontes, Les Miserables and The Hunchback of Notre Dame'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Helen Crawfurd      Print: Book

  

William Smith Williams : letter to Charlotte Bronte

Charlotte Bronte postscript to letter to William Smith Williams, 12 May 1848: 'I find -- on glancing over yours, that I have forgotten to answer a question you ask respecting my next work ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charlotte Bronte      Manuscript: Letter

  

William Smith Williams : letter

Charlotte Bronte to William Smith Williams, 22 November 1848: 'I put your most friendly letter [recommending homeopathic treatments] into Emily's hands as soon as I had myself perused it ... after reading your letter she said "Mr Williams' intention was kind and good, but he was under a delusion -- Homeopathy was only another form of Quackery."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charlotte Bronte      Manuscript: Letter

  

William Smith Williams : letter

Charlotte Bronte to William Smith Williams, 22 November 1848: 'I put your most friendly letter [recommending homeopathic treatments] into Emily's hands as soon as I had myself perused it ... after reading your letter she said "Mr Williams' intention was kind and good, but he was under a delusion -- Homeopathy was only another form of Quackery."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Emily Bronte      Manuscript: Letter

  

Mrs Smith : Note to Charlotte Bronte

Charlotte Bronte to Mrs Smith (mother of her publisher George Smith), 17 April 1851: 'Before I received your note, I was nursing a comfortable and complacent conviction that I had quite made up my mind not to go to London this year ... But Pride has its fall. I read your invitation and immediately felt a great wish to descend from my stilts.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Charlotte Bronte      Manuscript: Letter

  

Harriet and H. G. Martineau and Atkinson : Letters on the Laws of Man's Nature and Development

Charlotte Bronte to James Taylor, 1 February 1851: 'Have you yet read Miss Martineau's and Mr Atkinson's new work "Letters on the Nature and Development of Man?" ... It is the first exposition of avowed Atheism and Materialism I have ever read ...'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Charlotte Bronte      Print: Book

  

David Hume : History of England

I suppose I had read Hume's England when I wrote last; and I need not repeat my opinion of it.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carlyle      Print: Book

  

Tobias Smollett : History of England

I suppose I had read Hume's England when I wrote last; and I need not repeat my opinion of it. My perusal of the continuation - eight volumes, of history as it is called, by Tobias Smollett MD and others was a much harder and more unprofitable task.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carlyle      Print: Book

  

David Hume : Essays and Treatises on Several Subjects, 2 vols

But too much of one thing - as it is in the adage. Therefore I reserve the account of Hume's essays till another opportunity. At any rate the Second volume is not finished yet - and I do not like what I have read of any thing so well as I did the first.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carlyle      Print: Book

  

Henry Mackenzie : The Man of Feeling

I, who was the reader, had not seen it for several years, the rest did not know it at all. I am afraid I perceived a sad change in it, or myself ? which was worse; and the effect altogether failed. Nobody cried, and at some of the passages, the touches that I used to think so exquisite ? Oh Dear! They laughed.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Louisa Stuart      Print: Book

  

Henry Mackenzie : The Man of Feeling

I remember so well its first publication, my mother and sisters crying over it, dwelling upon it with rapture! And when I read it, as I was a girl of fourteen not yet versed in sentiment, I had a secret dread I should not cry enough to gain the credit of proper sensibility.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Louisa Stuart      Print: Book

  

Karl Marx : [unknown]

'Walter Citrine won, as a Sunday School prize, a volume of school stories from the Captain, including one by P.G. Wodehouse. "The lady who gave this prize awakened in me a thirst for good literature", eventually leading to the works of Karl Marx and his followers'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Walter Citrine      Print: Book

  

Richard Brinsley Sheridan (pen name? in any case, not the 18th c playwright) : The Filipino Martyrs

'As a boy Percy Wall adored the "Magnet", the "Boy's Own Paper", and G.A. Henty novels... [Later] While he read Henty for enjoyment, he studied the "Clarion", the "Freethinker", "The Struggle of the Bulgarians for Independence" and "The Philippine Martyrs" for their politics, and did not allow one body of literature to affect the other'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Percy Wall      Print: Book

  

Homer : 

'At the same time as she was entertaining herself with a variety of novels, [Frances] Burney was putting herself through an energetic course of solid reading, including Homer (in Pope's translation) and various histories of the ancient and modern world, as well as the works of major modern poets.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Frances Burney      Print: Book

  

Oliver Goldsmith : The Vicar of Wakefield

'In 1768, Burney read in rapid succession Elizabeth and Richard Griffith's "A Series of Genuine Letters between Henry and Frances" (1757) ... Oliver Goldsmith's "The Vicar of Wakefield" (1766); and Samuel Johnson's "Rasselas" (1759).'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Frances Burney      Print: Book

  

Homer : Iliad

'In her teens [Frances] Burney was tackling on her own such works as Plutarch's "Lives" (in translation), Pope's "Iliad", and ... all the works of Pope, including the Letters; Hume's "History of England"; Hooke's "Roman History"; and Conyers Middleton's "Life of Cicero" ... She also ... studied music theory in Diderot's treatise ...'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Frances Burney      Print: Book

  

David Hume : The History of England

'In her teens [Frances] Burney was tackling on her own such works as Plutarch's "Lives" (in translation), Pope's "Iliad", and ... all the works of Pope, including the Letters; Hume's "History of England"; Hooke's "Roman History"; and Conyers Middleton's "Life of Cicero" ... She also ... studied music theory in Diderot's treatise ...'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Frances Burney      Print: Book

  

Conyers Middleton : Life of Cicero

'In her teens [Frances] Burney was tackling on her own such works as Plutarch's "Lives" (in translation), Pope's "Iliad", and ... all the works of Pope, including the Letters; Hume's "History of England"; Hooke's "Roman History"; and Conyers Middleton's "Life of Cicero" ... She also ... studied music theory in Diderot's treatise ...'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Frances Burney      Print: Book

  

Phillips Oppenheim : [unknown]

'It is equally possible for the same reader to adopt different frames for the same story, relishing it on one level while seeing through the claptrap on another. In his youth Aneurin Bevan enjoyed the Magnet and Gem surreptitiously (his father forbade them) and devoured H. Rider Haggard at the Tredegar Workmen's Institute Library. But during the 'Phoney War' he lambasted the government's stupidly optimistic predictions in precisely the same terms: "Immediately on the outbreak of war, England was given over to the mental level of the Boys' Own Paper and the Magnet..." In 1944 Bevan freely admitted that "William le Queux, John Buchan and Phillips Oppenheim have always been favourites of ours in our off-moments. Part of their charm lies in their juvenile attitude".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Aneurin Bevan      Print: Book

  

Moliere : [unknown]

'James Hanley's workmates laughed when he taught himself French by reading the Mercure de France...Working the night shift at a railway station, Hanley withdrew into the work of Moliere, Hauptmann, Calderon, Sudermann, Ibsen, Lie and Strindberg until he grew quite cozy in his literary shell. His parents were appalled that he had no friends. But I've hundreds of friends he protested. "Bazarov and Rudin and Liza and Sancho Panza and Eugenie Grandet". His father countered with Squeers, Nickleby, Snodgrass and Little Nell: "And they're a healthy lot I might say, whereas all your friends have either got consumption, or are always in the dumps".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: James Hanley      Print: Book

  

Gerhart Hauptmann : [unknown]

'James Hanley's workmates laughed when he taught himself French by reading the Mercure de France...Working the night shift at a railway station, Hanley withdrew into the work of Moliere, Hauptmann, Calderon, Sudermann, Ibsen, Lie and Strindberg until he grew quite cozy in his literary shell. His parents were appalled that he had no friends. But I've hundreds of friends he protested. "Bazarov and Rudin and Liza and Sancho Panza and Eugenie Grandet". His father countered with Squeers, Nickleby, Snodgrass and Little Nell: "And they're a healthy lot I might say, whereas all your friends have either got consumption, or are always in the dumps".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: James Hanley      Print: Book

  

Hermann Sudermann : [unknown]

'James Hanley's workmates laughed when he taught himself French by reading the Mercure de France...Working the night shift at a railway station, Hanley withdrew into the work of Moliere, Hauptmann, Calderon, Sudermann, Ibsen, Lie and Strindberg until he grew quite cozy in his literary shell. His parents were appalled that he had no friends. But I've hundreds of friends he protested. "Bazarov and Rudin and Liza and Sancho Panza and Eugenie Grandet". His father countered with Squeers, Nickleby, Snodgrass and Little Nell: "And they're a healthy lot I might say, whereas all your friends have either got consumption, or are always in the dumps".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: James Hanley      Print: Book

  

Guy de Maupassant : Bel-Ami

'...he had read so much of de Maupassant, and had admired him for so many years, that probably his manner and his conceptions had sunk into his subconscious. As he said to himself, on re-reading "Bel-Ami" after ten years in 1903 - "People might easily say that in "A Man from the North" I had plagiarized from it..."'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Arnold Bennett      Print: Book

  

Guy de Maupassant : Une Vie

'When he reread "Une Vie", in March 1908, he could find faults, but they were irrelevant to the work that had been done to him.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Arnold Bennett      Print: Book

  

Joris Karl Huysmans : Les Soeurs Vatards

'A more recent influence was Huysmans' "Les Soeurs Vatards", a novel about artisan life in a lace-maker's atelier in Paris, which he read with great admiration in March 1907, and which he admired for its uncompromising realism . . .'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Arnold Bennett      Print: Book

  

Pauline Smith : The Little Karoo

'. . . her short stories, 'The Little Karoo', all set in the South Africa of her childhood, were widely admired and are still remembered. Bennett must have felt a justified pride in writing an introduction for the collection, in 1925, describing himself as "the earliest wondering admirer of her strange, austere, tender and ruthless talent"'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Arnold Bennett      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : Essays

'Girls in the top forms [at Roedean] were allowed to read ... in a small school library ... but ... [Margaret Cole] forfeited that privilege when a sub-prefect reported her for reading Macaulay's "Essays" during preparation time ...'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Cole      Print: Book

  

L. T. Meade : By Mutual Consent

'[In The Saturday Review, 19 November 1904], "A Mother" records the books consumed since July by her sixteen-year-old daughter ... [who is] on the point of going in for the "Senior Cambridge" ... : "Old Mortality", "The Farringdons", "By Mutual Consent" (L. T. Meade), "To Call Her Mine", "Kathrine Regina", and "Self or Bearer" (Besant); "Christmas Carol", "The Cricket on the Hearth", "Hypatia", "Concerning Isabel Carnaby", "The Virginians", "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer", "The Head of the House" (E. Everett-Green), "A Double Thread", "The Heir-Presumptive and the Heir-Apparent", "Sesame and Lilies", "A Tale of Two Cities".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group:      Print: Book

  

William Lempriere : Tour to Morocco

'Elizabeth Sewell ... remembered her mother in the 1820s reading aloud Anson's "Voyages", Lempriere's "Tour to Morocco", and "the History of Montezuma".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

Monier Williams : work/s on Eastern religions

'When she was thirteen or fourteen, [Constance] Maynard's businessman father used to read Monier Williams on the religions of the East, William Law, and Jacob Boehme aloud to her.'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Maynard      Print: Book

  

Jacob Boehme : 

'When she was thirteen or fourteen, [Constance] Maynard's businessman father used to read Monier Williams on the religions of the East, William Law, and Jacob Boehme aloud to her.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Maynard      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Sonnets

' ... [13-to-14-year-old Constance Maynard's] most intimate contact with reading .. took place ... in a secluded corner of the garden, where she haphazardly consumed Milton's sonnets, Cowper, Irving's "Orations", and Tennyson ...'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Constance Maynard      Print: Book

  

Alexandre Dumas : The Three Musketeers

'["In A Nursery in the Nineties" (1935)] Eleanor Farjeon (b.1881) ... recreates her identificatory enthusiam as she read "The Three Musketeers", which enabled her to step outside the bounds even of male, let alone female, notions of propriety.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Eleanor Farjeon      Print: Book

  

Homer : The Iliad

'Mary Paley Marshall ... one of Newnham's first students, recalls her father in the 1860s reading aloud "The Arabian Nights", "Gulliver's Travels", the "Iliad" and "Odyssey", Shakespeare, and, above all, Scott's novels ...'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Paley      Print: Book

  

Homer : The Odyssey

'Mary Paley Marshall ... one of Newnham's first students, recalls her father in the 1860s reading aloud "The Arabian Nights", "Gulliver's Travels", the "Iliad" and "Odyssey", Shakespeare, and, above all, Scott's novels ...'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Paley      Print: Book

  

George Moore : A Mummer's Wife

'Yeats forbade his sisters to read George Moore's "A Mummer's Wife": a proscription which led Susan Mitchell, who lived with the family, to "gulp ... guilty pages of it" as she went to bed.'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Susan Mitchell      Print: Book

  

Oliver Goldsmith : The Vicar of Wakefield

"Forbidden David Copperfield, Bleak House, The Heart of Midlothian, and The Vicar of Wakefield ... [H. M. Swanwick] read them none the less ... When she was lent Dante Gabriel Rosetti's poems by a friend, 'Jenny' ... came as a welcome antidote [to Dickens's and Scott's treatments of fallen women]."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: H. M. Swanwick      Print: Book

  

John Stuart Mill : Autobiography

Deborah Epstein Nord, The Apprenticeship of Beatrice Webb (1985) noted as "especially interesting ... in its discussion of Webb's ... reading of autobiographies (such as John Stuart Mill's Autobiography, Harriet Martineau's Autobiography, George Sand's Histoire de ma vie, and Wordsworth's Prelude ..."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Beatrice Webb      Print: Book

  

Harriet Martineau : Autobiography

Deborah Epstein Nord, The Apprenticeship of Beatrice Webb (1985) noted as "especially interesting ... in its discussion of Webb's ... reading of autobiographies (such as John Stuart Mill's Autobiography, Harriet Martineau's Autobiography, George Sand's Histoire de ma vie, and Wordsworth's Prelude ..."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Beatrice Webb      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Complete poetry

" ... it was whilst at a frivolous, rote-learning girls' school that ... [Frances Power Cobbe] developed her determined, methodical aproach [to reading] ... She read all the Faerie Queene, all of Milton's poetry, the Divina Commedia and Gerusalemme Liberata in the originals, and in translation the Iliad, Odyssey, Aenied, Pharsalia, and ... [nearly all] of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripedes, Ovid, Tacitus, Xenophon, Herodotus and Thucydides."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Frances Power Cobbe      Print: Book

  

David Hume : 

"Deist" and "heathen" authors studied by the young Frances Power Cobbe: "Gibbon, Hume, Tindal, Collins, and Voltaire ... Marcus Aurelius, Seneca, Epictetus, Plutarch's Moralia, Xenophon's Memorabilia, and a little Plato."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Frances Power Cobbe      Print: Book

  

Symington : 

"At home, after leaving school in 1857 ... [Louisa Martindale's] reading was, at first, chiefly the Bible. On 16 September she started to take Fraser's Magazine, and her diary becomes full of references to this, and to articles in the Times on subjects as diverse as Fortification and The War in New Zealand. She read, and was charmed by, Symington on architecture, sculpture, and painting ... Further books which she read included Froude's History of England ... The Bible and Modern Thought, Butler's Analogy, Memorials of Fox, Bancroft's American Revolution, Rollin's Ancient History, Waddington's Church History, the Works of Paley, Locke on the Human Understanding, and Mrs Jameson's Characteristics of Women."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Louisa Martindale      Print: Book

  

Mrs Jameson : Characteristics of Women

"At home, after leaving school in 1857 ... [Louisa Martindale's] reading was, at first, chiefly the Bible. On 16 September she started to take Fraser's Magazine, and her diary becomes full of references to this, and to articles in the Times on subjects as diverse as Fortification and The War in New Zealand. She read, and was charmed by, Symington on architecture, sculpture, and painting ... Further books which she read included Froude's History of England ... The Bible and Modern Thought, Butler's Analogy, Memorials of Fox, Bancroft's American Revolution, Rollin's Ancient History, Waddington's Church History, the Works of Paley, Locke on the Human Understanding, and Mrs Jameson's Characteristics of Women."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Louisa Martindale      Print: Book

  

Felicia Hemans : The Better Land

"Rocking her brother in his cradle ... [Marianne Farningham] was reading from the Sailor's Magazine and came across 'two poems, which had a marvellous effect on me'. The first was about a family Bible, the last line of each stanza being 'The old-fashioned Bible that lay on the stand'; the second was Felicia Hemans's 'The Better Land' [which almost caused her to faint with emotion] ..."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Marianne Farningham      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Francis Thompson : The Hound of Heaven

"Enid Starkie claimed that reading Francis Thompson's 'The Hound of Heaven' when she was ten made her feel as though she had been taken hold of and mastered, and determined that she should be a nun when she grew up."

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: Enid Starkie      Print: Unknown

  

William Morris : poetry

"Before she came into contact with Suffragism ... [Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence] felt her political outlook ... had been conditioned by reading Morris, Carpenter, and Whitman's poetry."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence      Print: Unknown

  

Walt Whitman : poetry

"Before she came into contact with Suffragism ... [Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence] felt her political outlook ... had been conditioned by reading Morris, Carpenter, and Whitman's poetry."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence      Print: Book

  

Walt Whitman : Leaves of Grass

"Harriet Shaw Weaver, as an adolescent, found Leaves of Grass 'a liberating influence and could even read it on Sundays as it wasn't a novel!'"

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Shaw Weaver      Print: Book

  

Samuel Smiles : LIfe and Labour

"In Holloway ... ['General' Drummond] read Jane Porter's The Scottish Chiefs and Samuel Smiles's Life and Labour."

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: General Drummond      Print: Book

  

David Hume : History of England

have been in the shop steadily this day (which has been cold and blowing), reading in Hume's History of England- the Norman Conquest.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Adam Mackie      Print: Book

  

David Hume : History of England

Am in shop about steady this day doing little else but reading Humes' England

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Adam Mackie      Print: Book

  

Lucy Maud Montgomery : Anne of Avonlea

'Mary Lakeman, a Cornish fisherman's daughter, confirmed what George Orwell had written in "Riding Down from Bangor": "Little Women", "Good Wives", "What Katy Did", "Avonlea", "Tom Sawyer", "Huckleberry Finn", and "The Last of the Mohicans" all created a romantic childhood vision of unlimited freedom and open space. "For me Jo, Beth and Laurie are right at the heart of a permanent unalterable American scene", she wrote, "and I can turn on Louisa M. Alcott and others so powerfully that Nixon and Watergate are completely blacked out".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Lakeman      Print: Book

  

Ernest Hemingway : A Farewell to Arms

'Growing up in a family that read newspapers only for sport and scandal, Vernon Scannell knew all the great prize fighters by age thirteen, "but I could not have named the Prime Minister of the day..." The history and geography he was taught at school were never related to contemporary events. Remarkably, Scannell had read widely about the last war: the poetry of Siegfried Sassoon and Wilfred Owen, Edmund Blunden's "Undertones of War", and Robert Graves's "Goodbye to All That". The Penguin edition of "A Farewell to Arms" so overwhelmed him that he tried to write his own Great War novel in a Hemingway style. But none of this translated into any awareness that another war might be on the way'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Vernon Scannell      Print: Book

  

R Morgan : Letters on Mythology

Letters on Mythology Addressed to a Lady by R. Morgan, 1 vol. A humourous and entertaining production, written in a light and easy style, to make it palatable to a lady's taste.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Ellen Weeton      Print: Book

  

Miss Elizabeth Hamilton : The Cottagers of Glenburnie: A Tale for the Farmer

The Cottagers of Glenburnie. 1 vol. by Miss Hamilton. A little tale tending to shew the folly of adhering to old customs merely because they have been habitual for many generations, particularlythe scottish tenacity, indolence, and want of cleanliness in their houses and about their farms. The tale is told in such a manner as scarcely to offend even a scotchman, and may very probably have some influence in effecting a reformation.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Ellen Weeton      Print: Book

  

John Lothrop Motley : The Rise of the Dutch Republic

'Barber John Paton remembered that the "Boys' Friend" "ran a serial which was an enormously exciting tale of Alba's oppression of the Netherlands, and gave as its source, 'Motley's Rise of the Dutch Republic'". He borrowed it from the public library and, with guidance from a helpful adult, also read J.R. Green, Macaulay, Prescott, Grote, and even Mommsen's multi-volume History of Rome by age fourteen. "There must have been, of course, enormous gaps in my understanding of what I poured into the rag bag that was my mind, particularly from the bigger works," he conceded, "but at least I sensed the important thing, the immense sweep and variety and the continuity of the historical process".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Paton      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : [probably The History of England from the Accession of James II]

'Barber John Paton remembered that the "Boys' Friend" "ran a serial which was an enormously exciting tale of Alba's oppression of the Netherlands, and gave as its source, Motley's 'Rise of the Dutch Republic'". He borrowed it from the public library and, with guidance from a helpful adult, also read J.R. Green, Macaulay, Prescott, Grote, and even Mommsen's multi-volume History of Rome by age fourteen. "There must have been, of course, enormous gaps in my understanding of what I poured into the rag bag that was my mind, particularly from the bigger works," he conceded, "but at least I sensed the important thing, the immense sweep and variety and the continuity of the historical process".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Paton      Print: Book

  

Christian Matthias Theodor Mommsen : History of Rome

'Barber John Paton remembered that the "Boys' Friend" "ran a serial which was an enormously exciting tale of Alba's oppression of the Netherlands, and gave as its source, Motley's 'Rise of the Dutch Republic'". He borrowed it from the public library and, with guidance from a helpful adult, also read J.R. Green, Macaulay, Prescott, Grote, and even Mommsen's multi-volume History of Rome by age fourteen. "There must have been, of course, enormous gaps in my understanding of what I poured into the rag bag that was my mind, particularly from the bigger works," he conceded, "but at least I sensed the important thing, the immense sweep and variety and the continuity of the historical process".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Paton      Print: Book

  

Frederick Marryat : 

'James Williams admitted that, growing up in rural Wales, "I'd read anything rather than not read at all. I read a great deal of rubbish, and books that were too 'old', or too 'young' for me". He consumed the Gem, Magnet and Sexton Blake as well as the standard boys' authors (Henty, Ballantyne, Marryat, Fenimore Cooper, Twain) but also Dickens, Scott, Trollope, the Brontes, George Eliot, even Prescott's "The Conquest of Peru" and "The Conquest of Mexico". He picked "The Canterbury Tales" out of an odd pile of used books for sale, gradually puzzled out the Middle English, and eventually adopted Chaucer as his favourite poet'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: James Williams      Print: Book

  

John Moore : A View of Society and Manners in France, Switzerla

'"Blessings on his head said Sancho Panza who first invented sleep", But what shall we say of the character of the French which I lately saw in "Moor's France"...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Sharp      Print: Book

  

Oliver Goldsmith : The Deserted Village

'It must be labour that makes things valuable Princes & Lords may flourish and may fade But a bold Peasantry, the Country's pride When once destroy'd can never be supplied.' [this is the first of a number of references to Goldsmith's poem]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Sharp      Print: Book

  

Charles Mills : The History of Chivalry; or Knighthood and Its Tim

'I have read over the "History of Chivalry", it really is true to the title page as nothing but Chivalry can befound in it. I cannot say that it is very amusing or instructive, altho' one sees a little more of its folly than is to be found in Walter Scott.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Sharp      Print: Book

  

David Hume : The History of England from the Invasion

'I know that Historians are very subject to give us their own views, instead of Facts. Hume is very partial to Royalty, and at every opportunity is ready to sneer at Religion, for which I do not admire him.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Sharp      Print: Book

  

Thomas Moore : Lalla Rookh

'Moore's Lallah Rookh & Byron's Childe Harold canto fourth formed an odd mixture with these speculations. It was foolish, you may think, to exchange the truths of philosophy, for the airy nothings of these sweet singers: but I could not help it. Do not fear that I will spend some time in criticising the tulip-cheek.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carlyle      Print: Book

  

Dr Chalmers : Title unknown

This is emphatic enough.- I need not speak of Dr Chalmers' boisterous treatise upon the causes & cure of pauperism in the last Edinr review. His reasoning (so they call it) is disjointed and absurd - & his language a barbarous jargon - agre[e]able neither to Gods nor men.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carlyle      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : History of England

" ... a young compositor encounters Macaulay for the first time: "'Bernard Shaw tells me how he could get more intoxication from Mozart and Beethoven than any common mortal could from a bottle of brandy. I was as intoxicated that day far more completely than wine or whisky have ever made me, and intoxicated by literary art, as well as by the pageantry of its historical theme.'"

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

Thomas Moore : Memoirs of the Life of the Rt Hon R B Sheridan

'I have read most of Moore's Life of Sheridan, I see Mr Canning first came into notice in 1794...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Sharp      Print: Book

  

Charles Mills : The History of Chivalry; or Knighthood and Its Times

'I have begun to read Hill's history of Chivalry, the author seems to be delighted with his subject, and I have no doubt but he treats it in a proper manner; - This is a glorious day'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Sharp      Print: Book

  

John Milton : A Mask Presented at Ludlow Castle

"Henry Wotton recalled coming across Milton's A Mask Presented at Ludlow Castle 'in the very close of the late R's Poems, Printed at Oxford' ..."

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Wotton      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Regain'd/Samson Agonistes

"One of the copies [of Paradise Regain'd ... Samson Agonistes] I examined at the British Library, London (shelfmark C14a12) ... contains handwritten corrections of both the errata and Omissa."

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

George Meredith : [unknown]

Elizabeth Morrison, "Serial Fiction in Australian Colonial Newspapers": " ... the short novel A Woman's Friendship ... owes much to [Ada] Cambridge's reading of George Eliot, George Meredith, Henry James, and William Dean Howells ..."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Ada Cambridge      Print: Unknown

  

Henry James : 

Elizabeth Morrison, "Serial Fiction in Australian Colonial Newspapers": " ... the short novel A Woman's Friendship ... owes much to [Ada] Cambridge's reading of George Eliot, George Meredith, Henry James, and William Dean Howells ..."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Ada Cambridge      Print: Unknown

  

Charles Lamb : Essays of Elia

'Growing up in Lyndhurst after the First World War, R.L. Wild regularly read aloud to his marginally literate grandmother and his completely illiterate grandfather - and it was his grandparents who selected the books... "I shall never understand how this choice was made. Until I started reading to them they had no more knowledge of English literature than a Malay Aborigine... I suppose it was their very lack of knowledge that made the choice, from "Quo Vadis" at eight, Rider Haggard's "She" at nine. By the time I was twelve they had come to know, intimately, a list of authors ranging from Shakespeare to D.H. Lawrence. All was grist to the mill (including Elinor Glyn). The classics, poetry, essays, belles lettres. We took them all in MY stride. At times we stumbled on gems that guided us to further riches. I well remember the Saturday night they brought home "The Essays of Elia". For months afterwards we used it as our roadmap...".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: R.L. Wild      Print: Book

  

John Milton : 

'George Howell, bricklayer and trade unionist..."read promiscuously. How could it be otherwise? I had no real guide, was obliged to feel my way into light. Yet perhaps there was a guidance, although indefinite and without distinctive aim". Howell groped his way through literature "on the principle that one poet's works suggested another, or the criticisms on one led to comparisons with another. Thus: Milton - Shakespeare; Pope-Dryden; Byron-Shelley; Burns-Scott; Coleridge-Wordsworth and Southey, and later on Spenser-Chaucer, Bryant-Longfellow, and so on". By following these intertextual links, autodidacts could reconstruct the literary canon on their own'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: George Howell      Print: Book

  

Christopher Marlowe : 

'There was a lending library in town, but with no education or guidance in English literature, [Edwin Muir] wasted valuable reading time. Then there was opposition from his father, who made him return a study of "the Atheist" David Hume. And when his brother gave him 3d to spend, he was almost insulted to learn that the money had gone to purchase Penny Poets editions of "As You Like It", "The Earthly Paradise" and Matthew Arnold. At home there was nothing to read except [various items mentioned in a previous entry and], "Gulliver's Travels", an R.M. Ballantyne tale about Hudson's Bay...a large volume documenting a theological dispute between a Protestant clergyman and a Catholic priest, a novel that was probably "Sense and Sensibility" ("I could make nothing of it, but this did not keep me from reading it")... "I read a complete series of sentimental love tales very popular at the time, called Sunday Stories", as well as a raft of temperance novels. Consequently, when he stumbled across Christopher Marlowe or George Crabbe in that literary junkyard, "it was like an addition to a secret treasure; for no one knew of my passion, and there was none to whom I could speak of it".'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Edwin Muir      Print: Book

  

Henry James : [unknown]

'[Neville] Cardus read only boys' papers until quite suddenly, in adolescence, he dove into Dickens and Mark Twain. "Then, without scarcely a bridge-passage, I was deep in the authors who to this day I regard the best discovered in a lifetime" - Fielding, Browning, Hardy, Tolstoy, even Henry James. He found them all before he was twenty, with critical guidance from no one: "We must make our own soundings and chartings in the arts... so that we may all one day climb to our own peak, silent in Darien".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Neville Cardus      Print: Book

  

Herman Melville : Moby Dick

'"Reading for me then was haphazard, unguided, practically uncritical", recalled boilermaker's daughter Marjory Todd. "I slipped all too easily into those traps for the half-baked - books about books, the old 'John O' London's Weekly', chit-chat of one kind or another". Yet in a few years she had advanced to "Moby Dick", "Lord Jim", "Crime and Punishment", and "Wuthering Heights".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Marjory Todd      Print: Book

  

Ralph Waldo Emerson : Self Reliance

'Charlie Chaplin was a classic autodidact, always struggling to make up for a dismally inadequate education, groping haphazardly for what he called "intellectual manna"... Chaplin could be found in his dressing room studying a Latin-English dictionary, Robert Ingersoll's secularist propaganda, Emerson's "Self- Reliance" ("I felt I had been handed a golden birthright"), Irving, Hawthorne, Poe, Whitman, Twain, Hazlitt, all five volumes of Plutarch's Lives, Plato, Locke, Kant, Freud's "Psychoneurosis", Lafcadio Hearn's "Life and Literature", and Henri Bergson - his essay on laughter, of course... Chaplin also spent forty years reading (if not finishing) the three volumes of "The World as Will and Idea" by Schopenhauer, whose musings on suicide are echoed in Monsieur Verdoux'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Spencer Chaplin      Print: Book

  

Walt Whitman : [unknown]

'Charlie Chaplin was a classic autodidact, always struggling to make up for a dismally inadequate education, groping haphazardly for what he called "intellectual manna"... Chaplin could be found in his dressing room studying a Latin-English dictionary, Robert Ingersoll's secularist propaganda, Emerson's "Self- Reliance" ("I felt I had been handed a golden birthright"), Irving, Hawthorne, Poe, Whitman, Twain, Hazlitt, all five volumes of Plutarch's Lives, Plato, Locke, Kant, Freud's "Psychoneurosis", Lafcadio Hearn's "Life and Literature", and Henri Bergson - his essay on laughter, of course... Chaplin also spent forty years reading (if not finishing) the three volumes of "The World as Will and Idea" by Schopenhauer, whose musings on suicide are echoed in Monsieur Verdoux'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Spencer Chaplin      Print: Book

  

Charles Montholon : Bonaparte's memorial in a letter

'Read Buonaparte's Memorial to Sir Hudson Lowe, a poor performance and utterly unworthy his fallen greatness'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Benjamin Newton      Print: Book

  

John Macleod : Narrative of a voyage in his majesty's late ship A

'Read Walpoe's Turkey amd M'Cleod's Voyage of the Alceste to China.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Benjamin Newton      

  

Thomas Chalmers : A series of discourses on the Christian recelation

'Having lately read Chalmers Sermons on Astronomy in which he has expressed the highest admiration and respect for I. Newton's modest and firm faith in christianity.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Benjamin Newton      

  

John Macleod : Voyage of the Alceste

'Read M'cleod's Voyage of the Alceste, his account of the Island of Lewchew is an account of the most amiable pagans I ever read of N.B. little or nothing is said of the females.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Benjamin Newton      

  

William Derham : Physio Theology or a Demonstartion of the being

'Proceeded with Denham's "Physico-Theology". Read Hurd's sermon on "Every soul shall be salted with fire", an odd mode of preaching, he seems to give two guesses at the meaning of the passage and tells his audience they may take which they like.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Benjamin Newton      Print: Book

  

Frederick Marryat : Masterman Ready, or the Wreck in the Pacific

[imaginative role play] 'One chauffeur's daughter alternated effortlessly between heroes and heroines: "I have plotted against pirates along with Jim Hawkins and I have trembled with Jane Eyre as the first Mrs Rochester rent her bridal veil in maddened jealousy. I have been shipwrecked with Masterman Ready and on Pitcairn Island with Fletcher Christian. I have been a medieval page in Sir Nigel and Lorna Doone madly in love with 'girt Jan Ridd'".

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Wharton      Print: Book

  

Richard Doddridge Blackmore : Lorna Doone

[imaginative role play] 'One chauffeur's daughter alternated effortlessly between heroes and heroines: "I have plotted against pirates along with Jim Hawkins and I have trembled with Jane Eyre as the first Mrs Rochester rent her bridal veil in maddened jealousy. I have been shipwrecked with Masterman Ready and on Pitcairn Island with Fletcher Christian. I have been a medieval page in Sir Nigel and Lorna Doone madly in love with 'girt Jan Ridd'".

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Wharton      Print: Book

  

Mrs Trimmer : New and Comprehensive Lessons, Containing a General Outline of the Roman HIstory

"Florence Nightingale's copy of Mrs. Trimmer's New and Comprehensive Lessons, Containing a General Outline of the Roman History (1818) has Nightingale's autograph in pencil on a flyleaf ... and pencilled marks -- an 'x' or an 'A' at the ends of chapters to show how far she had got with her reading."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Florence Nightingale      Print: Book

  

Michel de Montaigne : essays

" ... [Alexander Pope's surviving books] allow us to be confident about his having read certain works, such as the essays of Montaigne."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Alexander Pope      Print: Book

  

William Mudford : Nubilia in Search of a Husband

H. J. Jackson discusses copious annotations and commentary by unidentified, contemporary male reader in copy of William Mudford, Nubilia in Search of a Husband (1809); annotations include subject headings, and remarks including "'The preceding observations on tuition are, I make no doubt, very just ...'" and "'Let a certain fair reader attend to this passage.'"

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

William Derham : Physico Theology: or a Demonstration of the being

'Finished Derham's "Physico Theology" and read Campbell's narrative of a voyage round the world'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Benjamin Newton      Print: Book

  

Archibald Campbell : A Voyage Round the World, from 1806-1812

'Finished Derham's "Physico Theology" and read Campbell's narrative of a Voyage round the world'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Benjamin Newton      Print: Book

  

Gerald Massey : Lyrics of Love

"Take, for instance, his 'Lyrics of Love', so full of beauty and tenderness. Nor are his 'Songs of Progress' less full of poetic power and beauty."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Smiles      Print: Book

  

Gerald Massey : Songs of Progress

"Take, for instance, his 'Lyrics of Love', so full of beauty and tenderness. Nor are his 'Songs of Progress' less full of poetic power and beauty."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Smiles      Print: Book

  

J Smith : advertisement

'These drawings were placed on the hands of Mr C J Smith, with whom I had become acquainted through an advertisement.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Cole      Print: Advertisement

  

Williamson : A Journal of a naturalist

'This summer (1825) the author of 'A Journal of a naturalist', states to have been, what it certainly was, 'hot and dry'.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Cole      Print: Book

  

W Trimmer : Sacred History

'Read W Trimmer's Sacred History.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Cole      Print: Book

  

Mary Leadbetter and Maria Edgeworth : Cottage Dialogues Amongst the Irish Peasantry

'Have you seen the little book, 'Cottage Dialogues', by Mrs Leadbetter. Edgeworth's notes are lively and [nationally] characteristic as ever: but I own I am tired a little of the receipts to make cheap dishes.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sarah Harriet Burney      Print: Book

  

Joseph Milner : History of the Church of Christ

H. J. Jackson notes annotations by Macaulay made in 1836 in his copy of Joseph Milner, History of the Church of Christ; these include: "'You bolt every lie that the Fathers tell as glibly as your Creed'," and "'Here I give in. I have done my best -- But the monotonous absurdity dishonesty & malevolence of this man are beyond me. Nov 13'.'"

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Michel de Montaigne : 

"Lady Mary [Wortley Montagu] used French for some of the (relatively few) notes in her Montaigne."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Mary Wortley Montagu      Print: Book

  

Malvina [pseud.] : [poetry]

'On my return to Scarborough was busily employed in preparing for the season, & in editing the work called The Scarborough Album, and in soliciting contributions of a poetical description; these were of a good class, & abundantly bestowed. Archdeacon Wrangham wrote an original piece for the work 'Lines on the sea bathing infirmary at Scarborough'. The Mss of George Berret, the Younger, were freely offered to my use; & Hermione (Mrs Ballantyre, widow of the celebrated Publisher in Edinburgh) kindly controbuted. I also reprinted the celebrated pieces under the signature of Malvina, from The Scarborough Repository.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Cole      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Somerset Maughan : Of Human Bondage

'I?m reading "Of Human Bondage" of Somerset Maugham & it?s terribly good ? some wonderful school stuff, & of course the whole thing, in his subtle way, is quite itching with queerness. Perhaps I?ll send you a copy to Chicago to read in bed.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Peter Pears      Print: Book

  

R J Yeatman : 1066 and all that

'- have you ever read a book called "1066 & all that" ?i t's very funny, & one of the authors is on board.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Benjamin Britten      Print: Book

  

Elizabeth Montague : [essay on Shakespeare]

'I have read the greater part of the History of James I and Mrs. Montagues?s essay on Shakespeare, and a great deal of Gibbon'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Thomas Malthus : Essay on the Principle of Population

"In January 1804 Coleridge annotated, heavily, in pencil, the first dozen or so pages of a copy of Thomas Malthus's Essay on the Principle of Population by way of assistance to Southey, who had to review it."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Charles Macready : [diary]

'Rather like celibate life in Paris again. I dined at the club and read Macready's diary;. . .'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Arnold Bennett      Print: Book

  

James Martineau : Types of Ethical Theory

'I am reading Martineau ["Types of Ethical Theory"] and like it, indeed I think I shall leave of writing this and go on.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Sir Walter Raleigh      Print: Book

  

Walt Whitman : [unknown]

'I spent the morning reading dramatists, to qualify myself to teach English Literature [...] while in the evening I read Walt Whitman's last book aloud to Alice, thus establishing myself as a (qualified) Whitmaniac.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Sir Walter Raleigh      Print: Book

  

John Bramhall : Castigation of Mr Hobbes [with the appendix]The Ca

'I went to the Library; read Bramhall against Hobbes'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Byrom      Print: Book

  

Frederick Marryat : [unknown]

'Marjory Todd read [the books of Hesba Stretton, Mrs O.F. Walton and Amy le Feuvre but felt later that] "I would not now willingly expose a child of mine to the morbid resignation of any of these books... yet I think that children, when their home life is secure and happy, can take a lot of that debilitating sentiment... We sharpened our teeth on this stuff and then went on to greater satisfaction elsewhere", including "Pride and Prejudice", "Jane Eyre", "Alice in Wonderland", Captain Marryat, Kenneth Grahame, and E. Nesbit'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Marjory Todd      Print: Book

  

Kenneth Grahame : [probably The Wind in the Willows etc]

'Marjory Todd read [the books of Hesba Stretton, Mrs O.F. Walton and Amy le Feuvre but felt later that] "I would not now willingly expose a child of mine to the morbid resignation of any of these books... yet I think that children, when their home life is secure and happy, can take a lot of that debilitating sentiment... We sharpened our teeth on this stuff and then went on to greater satisfaction elsewhere", including "Pride and Prejudice", "Jane Eyre", "Alice in Wonderland", Captain Marryat, Kenneth Grahame, and E. Nesbit'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Marjory Todd      Print: Book

  

Oliver Goldsmith : History of England

'Robert Collyer grew up in a blacksmith's home with only a few books - "Pilgrim's Progress", "Robinson Crusoe", Goldsmith's histories of England and Rome - but their basic language made them easy to absorb and excellent training for a future clergyman:. "I think it was then I must have found the germ... of my lifelong instinct for the use of simple Saxon words and sentences which has been of some worth to me in the work I was finally called to do".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Collyer      Print: Book

  

Oliver Goldsmith : History of Rome

'Robert Collyer grew up in a blacksmith's home with only a few books - "Pilgrim's Progress", "Robinson Crusoe", Goldsmith's histories of England and Rome - but their basic language made them easy to absorb and excellent training for a future clergyman: "I think it was then I must have found the germ... of my lifelong instinct for the use of simple Saxon words and sentences which has been of some worth to me in the work I was finally called to do".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Collyer      Print: Book

  

Thomas a Kempis : The Imitation of Christ

'Gifford had read only some ballads, the black-letter romance Parismus and Parismenus, some odd loose magazines of his mother's, the Bible (which he studied with his grandmother) and "The Imitation of Christ" (read to his mother on her deathbed). He then learned algebra by surreptitiously reading Fenning's textbook: his master's son owned the book and had deliberately hidden it from him'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: William Gifford      Print: Book

  

T. J. Mathias : Pursuits of Literature

H. J. Jackson notes annotations by T. B. Macaulay in T. J. Mathias, Pursuits of Literature, including "'Bah!'" "'A contemptible heap of rant & twaddle'" and "'Noisome pedantry'."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Babington Macaulay      Print: Book

  

Adam Smith : [unknown]

'After a miserable Catholic school education...periodic unemployment allowed [Joseph Toole] to study in the Manchester Reference Library. There he discovered, Adam Smith, Ricardo, Herbert Spencer, Huxley, Mill, Emerson, Dickens, Morris, Blatchford, Shaw and Wells, and of course John Ruskin..."Study always left me with a deep feeling that there was so much amiss with the world. It seemed that it had been started at the wrong end, and that it was everybody's business to put the matter right".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Toole      Print: Book

  

John Stuart Mill : [unknown]

'After a miserable Catholic school education...periodic unemployment allowed [Joseph Toole] to study in the Manchester Reference Library. There he discovered, Adam Smith, Ricardo, Herbert Spencer, Huxley, Mill, Emerson, Dickens, Morris, Blatchford, Shaw and Wells, and of course John Ruskin..."Study always left me with a deep feeling that there was so much amiss with the world. It seemed that it had been started at the wrong end, and that it was everybody's business to put the matter right".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Toole      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

[Entry from Commonplace Book]: 'Mammon (figurative) description of, Paradise Lost, Book 1, line 680'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Edward Davy Harrop      Print: Book

  

Ralph Waldo Emerson : [unknown]

'After a miserable Catholic school education...periodic unemployment allowed [Joseph Toole] to study in the Manchester Reference Library. There he discovered, Adam Smith, Ricardo, Herbert Spencer, Huxley, Mill, Emerson, Dickens, Morris, Blatchford, Shaw and Wells, and of course John Ruskin..."Study always left me with a deep feeling that there was so much amiss with the world. It seemed that it had been started at the wrong end, and that it was everybody's business to put the matter right".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Toole      Print: Book

  

William Morris : [unknown]

'After a miserable Catholic school education...periodic unemployment allowed [Joseph Toole] to study in the Manchester Reference Library. There he discovered, Adam Smith, Ricardo, Herbert Spencer, Huxley, Mill, Emerson, Dickens, Morris, Blatchford, Shaw and Wells, and of course John Ruskin..."Study always left me with a deep feeling that there was so much amiss with the world. It seemed that it had been started at the wrong end, and that it was everybody's business to put the matter right".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Toole      Print: Book

  

John Morfitt : poems in poems including Lines on Hatton

H. J. Jackson discusses "sarcastic" marginal remarks by Samuel Parr in his copy of Poems by Mrs Pickering (1794), a volume including poems by John Morfitt and Joseph Weston; Morfitt's poem "Lines on Hatton" includes a "verse portrait" of Parr, who was parson and schoolmaster of the village of Hatton.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Parr      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

H. J. Jackson discusses copy of Paradise Lost annotated by John Keats for Mrs Dilke, in which passages highlighted and critical commentary added.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Keats      Print: Book

  

Karl Marx : Das Kapital

'[Patrick McGill] read virtually nothing, not even the daily papers until, working on the rail line, he happened to pick up some poetry written on a page from an exercise book. somehow it spoke to him and he began to read "ravenously". He brought "Sartor Resartus", "Sesame and Lilies" and Montaigne's essays to work. "Les Miserables" reduced him to tears, though he found "Das Kapital" less affecting. Each payday he set aside a few shillings to buy secondhand books, which after a month's use were almost illegible with rust, grease and dirt....[eventually he] went on to become a popular novelist.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Patrick McGill      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : Lays of Ancient Rome: with "Ivry" and "The Armada"

H. J. Jackson notes annotations made by John James Raven over period of around 40-50 years in copy of Macaulay's Lays of Ancient Rome given to him in 1848, "when Raven was a schoolboy of fifteen."

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John James Raven      Print: Book

  

Helen Maria Williams : Sketches of the State of Manners and Opinions in the French Republic Towrds the Close of the Eighteenth Century

"Horatio Nelson's copy of Helen Maria Williams's Sketches of the State of Manners and Opinions in the French Republic Towards the Close of the Eighteenth Century (1801) ... has very little marking and only a few actual notes in it, but all his notes correct the author on matters of fact ..."

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Horatio Nelson      Print: Book

  

Christopher Marlowe : [unknown]

'Lancashire journalist Allen Clarke (b.1863), the son of a Bolton textile worker, avidly read his father's paperback editions of Shakespeare and ploughed through the literature section (Chaucer, Marlowe, Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher, Milton, Pope, Chatterton, Goldsmith, Byron, Shelley, Burns, Wordsworth, Leigh Hunt) of the public library. With that preparation, he was winning prizes for poems in London papers by age thirteen...[he] went on to found and edit several Lancashire journals'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Allen Clarke      Print: Book

  

John Milton : [unknown]

'Lancashire journalist Allen Clarke (b.1863), the son of a Bolton textile worker, avidly read his father's paperback editions of Shakespeare and ploughed through the literature section (Chaucer, Marlowe, Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher, Milton, Pope, Chatterton, Goldsmith, Byron, Shelley, Burns, Wordsworth, Leigh Hunt) of the public library. With that preparation, he was winning prizes for poems in London papers by age thirteen...[he] went on to found and edit several Lancashire journals'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Allen Clarke      Print: Book

  

Oliver Goldsmith : [unknown]

'Lancashire journalist Allen Clarke (b.1863), the son of a Bolton textile worker, avidly read his father's paperback editions of Shakespeare and ploughed through the literature section (Chaucer, Marlowe, Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher, Milton, Pope, Chatterton, Goldsmith, Byron, Shelley, Burns, Wordsworth, Leigh Hunt) of the public library. With that preparation, he was winning prizes for poems in London papers by age thirteen...[he] went on to found and edit several Lancashire journals'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Allen Clarke      Print: Book

  

Francis Beaumont : [unknown]

'Lancashire journalist Allen Clarke (b.1863), the son of a Bolton textile worker, avidly read his father's paperback editions of Shakespeare and ploughed through the literature section (Chaucer, Marlowe, Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher, Milton, Pope, Chatterton, Goldsmith, Byron, Shelley, Burns, Wordsworth, Leigh Hunt) of the public library. With that preparation, he was winning prizes for poems in London papers by age thirteen...[he] went on to found and edit several Lancashire journals'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Allen Clarke      Print: Book

  

Henry James : [unknown]

'A.E. Coppard, a laundrywoman's son who grew up in dire poverty, left school at nine, ascended the ranks of clerkdom and became (at age forty) a professional author. At fourteen he was still enjoying "Deadeye Dick", by twenty he was reading Henry James...He secured a literary education at the Brighton Public Library, and as a professional runner he used prize money to buy Hardy's poems, Shakespeare, Mackail's translation of "The Odyssey", and William Morris's "The Earthly Paradise". In an undemanding job... he read on company time, though there was a row when his supervisor found "Jude the Obscure" on his desk'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Alfred Edgar Coppard      Print: Book

  

Homer : Odyssey

'A.E. Coppard, a laundrywoman's son who grew up in dire poverty, left school at nine, ascended the ranks of clerkdom and became (at age forty) a professional author. At fourteen he was still enjoying "Deadeye Dick", by twenty he was reading Henry James...He secured a literary education at the Brighton Public Library, and as a professional runner he used prize money to buy Hardy's poems, Shakespeare, Mackail's translation of "The Odyssey", and William Morris's "The Earthly Paradise". In an undemanding job... he read on company time, though there was a row when his supervisor found "Jude the Obscure" on his desk'.

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Alfred Edgar Coppard      Print: Book

  

William Morris : The Earthly Paradise

'A.E. Coppard, a laundrywoman's son who grew up in dire poverty, left school at nine, ascended the ranks of clerkdom and became (at age forty) a professional author. At fourteen he was still enjoying "Deadeye Dick", by twenty he was reading Henry James...He secured a literary education at the Brighton Public Library, and as a professional runner he used prize money to buy Hardy's poems, Shakespeare, Mackail's translation of "The Odyssey", and William Morris's "The Earthly Paradise". In an undemanding job... he read on company time, though there was a row when his supervisor found "Jude the Obscure" on his desk'.

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Alfred Edgar Coppard      Print: Book

  

Thomas Malory : Morte d'Arthur

'When the seventeen-year-old seaman entered Mr Pratt's bookstore on Sixth Avenue near Greenwich Avenue, he bought his first volume of Sir Thomas Malory's Morete d'Arthur; with this he began his career of serious reading as well as his devotion to pre-Renaissance English literature'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Masefield      Print: Book

  

John Milton : [unknown]

'Masefield habitually purchased a book each Friday evening and read it over the weekend. Among the first purchases was a seventy-five cent copy of Chaucer; and that evening, as he recalled, "I stretched myself on my bed, and began to read 'The Parliament of Fowls'; and with the first lines entered into a world of poetry until then unknown to me". As a result, Masefield's study of poetry deepened, and Chaucer, John Milton, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and John Keats became his mentors. Shelley converted the impressionable youth to vegetarianism....Unfortunately [he] overdid vegetarianism by abjuring milk; and, weak from lack of protein, he finally gave up the regimen'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Masefield      Print: Book

  

Niccolo Machiavelli : Discorsi sopra la prima deca di Tito Livio

Anthony Grafton, "Discitur ut agatur: How Gabriel Harvey Read His Livy": "In 1584 ... in Cambridge, Harvey read Livy ... with Thomas Preston, master of Trinity Hall. They read Machiavelli's Discorsi at the same time ... They read several other up-to-date works on pragmatic politics as well, notably Jean Bodin's Methodus and Republic."

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Gabriel Harvey and Thomas Preston     Print: Book

  

Niccolo Machiavelli : The Art of War

Anthony Grafton, in "Discitur ut agatur: How Gabriel Harvey Read His Livy," notes Harvey's reading, and light annotation, of Niccolo Machiavelli, The Art of War.

Century: 1500-1599 / 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Gabriel Harvey      Print: Book

  

F. Sommer Merryweather : Lives and Anecdotes of Misers

'The conception of this particular novel ["Riceyman Steps"] was probably sparked off by the discovery, in an old Southampton bookshop, T. James and Co., of 34 Bernard Street, of a curious old book called "Lives and Anecdotes of Misers", by F. Sommer Merryweather (1850). Bennett bought it in 1921 on one of his yachting expeditions, read it and used it.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Arnold Bennett      Print: Book

  

Mioddleton Murry : Adelphi, The

'Intellectually, he seems to have been most concerned with the affairs of Middleton Murry's new periodical, the "Adelphi". . . . doesn't like Murry's layout and advertising. . .criticized Middleton Murry's editorials about his late wife Katherine Mansfield. . . . Bennett's letters about this problem are a model of tact . . .'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Arnold Bennett      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Oliver Goldsmith : The Vicar of Wakefield

'She was "surprised into tears" by "The Vicar of Wakefield", although she did not much like it.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Frances Burney      Print: Book

  

Mary Wortley Montagu : Letters

'[Mary Wortley] Montagu's Letters and accounts of the sexual freedom of Tahitian women were popular: Elizabeth Montagu and Anna Seward for instance, read both.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Anna Seward      Print: Book

  

Mary Wortley Montagu : Letters

'[Mary Wortley] Montagu's Letters and accounts of the sexual freedom of Tahitian women were popular: Elizabeth Montagu and Anna Seward for instance, read both.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Montagu      Print: Book

  

Garci Rodriguez de Montalvo : Amadis de Gaule

'Robert Boyle being made to "read the state adventures of Amadis de Gaulle and other fabulous stories" which met a "restless fancy, then made more susceptible of any impressions by an unemployed pensiveness" and accustomed his thoughts to such a habitude of roving, that he [had] scarce ever been their quiet master since.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Boyle      Print: Unknown

  

Thomas Malthus : Essay on Population

[Sedgwick read the 'Essay' twice in 1811]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Adam Sedgwick      Print: Book

  

Johann Lorenz von Mosheim : An Ecclesiastical History, ancient and modern

'During these twelve months [in prison] I read with deep interest and much profit Gibbon's "Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire", Hume's "History of England", and many other standard works- amongst others, Mosheims "Ecclesiastical History". The reading of that book would have made me a freethinker if I had not been one before.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: James Watson      Print: Book

  

David Hume : The History of England

'During these twelve months [in prison] I read with deep interest and much profit Gibbon's "Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire", Hume's "History of England", and many other standard works- amongst others, Mosheims "Ecclesiastical History". The reading of that book would have made me a free thinker if I had not been one before.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: James Watson      Print: Book

  

David Thompson : History of the Late War Between Great Britain and

'I have been reading Thompson's "History of the Late War in Britain"; Decrees Blockades.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Richard Grahame      Print: Book

  

Hannah More : Coelebs in search of a wife

[Burney was] 'not impressed by Samuel James Arnold's "The Creole", Lady Morgan's "The Missionary", Edgeworth's "Patronage", which she found "dull and heavy" or Hannah More's "Coelebs", which she found "monotonously without interest of ANY kind", despite her approval of its politics.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Frances Burney      Print: Book

  

Lady Morgan : The Missionary

'[Burney was] 'not impressed by Samuel James Arnold's "The Creole", Lady Morgan's "The Missionary", Edgeworth's "Patronage", which she found "dull and heavy" or Hannah More's "Coelebs", which she found "monotonously without interest of ANY kind", despite her approval of its politics.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Frances Burney      Print: Book

  

Lady Morgan : The Novice of Saint Dominick

'[Harriet Grove] enjoyed novels and plays: in 1809-10, she read with pleasure in a family group a number of popular bestsellers (which in the period means largely novels by women), including Lady Morgan's "The Novice of Saint Dominick", Agnes Maria Bennett's "The Beggar Girl and her Benefactors", Edgeworth's "Tales of Andrews", "Sir Charles Grandison" and "A Sentimental Journey"'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Grove      Print: Book

  

Elizabeth Hamilton : Memoirs of Modern Philosophers

'In December 1810 a box of books arrived and the family began to read a novel which they "liked very much". This book is "modern Philosophy", whose anti-heroine, "Miss Biddy Botherin", who made them "Laugh a good deal", is a devotee of radical Godwinian philosophy, a satirical portrait probably combining elements pf Mary Hays and Mary Wollstonecraft" [hence Grove is resisting her then-fiance Shelley's philosophy and aesthetics.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Grove      Print: Book

  

Lord Kames : 

'Janet Schaw and her cousin, sailing from Scotland to the Caribbean, try to keep calm in a terrifying storm by reading Lord Kames ('like philosophers not Christians').'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Janet Schaw      Print: Book

  

William Mason : Caractacus

'[opinion of William Mason's play, "Caractacus", entered in diary]: 'My soul melted into every pleasing sensation, the language charming! divine harmony, beams in every line such a love of virtue! such examples of piety, resignation and fortitude! raise the soul to an ecstatic height. Sweet Evelinda how my heart throbbed for her!'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Anna Larpent      Print: Book

  

Jean Francois Marmontel : Moral Tales

'E- being called out for a few hours in the morning I attempted to amuse myself with Marmontel's Tales- it was but an attempt. For I hurried thro' them 'quite upon thorns' expecting every moment his return, - which prevented either pleasure or instruction to arise from it.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Upcott      Print: Book

  

James Hackman : Love and Madness; a Story Too True in a Series of...

'In the evening I read the whole of "Love and Madness"- not on account of the amorous epistles of Hackman, but with a view to make myself more acquainted with the fate of Poor Chatterton.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Upcott      Print: Book

  

James Hackman : Love and Madness

'I took from my pocket the volume of "Love and Madness" which I had amused myself with a few evenings since- ...I read with great pleasure the whole of the History of Poor Chatterton to Mr H.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Upcott      Print: Book

  

Tobias George Smollett : The Adventures of Ferdinand Count Fathom

'I got thro 6 chapters of Count Fathom- about an hours undertaking- and this has been the way thro my whole readings- a chapter at one hour - the volume thrown aside for perhaps two more- take it up make another attempt- ...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Upcott      Print: Book

  

Herman Melville : The Green Hand

'Herman Melville's "The Green Hand" he had read but it "was not much use to me" - a phrase which suggests that already he was reading as a writer reads, with a view to using the book for his own development. He read other works by Melville, and enjoyed parts of "Moby Dick"'.

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: John Masefield      Print: Book

  

Herman Melville : Moby Dick

'Herman Melville's "The Green Hand" he had read but it "was not much use to me" - a phrase which suggests that already he was reading as a writer reads, with a view to using the book for his own development. He read other works by Melville, and enjoyed parts of "Moby Dick"'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Masefield      Print: Book

  

George du Maurier : Trilby

'One book... stimulated the poet beyond all others; it became, in a way, a key to the rest of his reading for some time to come. This was George du Maurier's "Trilby". It was not so much the work itself - though John Masefield enjoyed it more than any book he had read until then - which played so prominent a part in forming his tastes, but the other works which George du Maurier put John Masefield on to... Whatever book "Trilby" mentions John Masefield bought... On the oblique recommendations in "Trilby" he read the "Three Musketeers"; Sterne's "Sentimental Journey"; Darwin's "Origin of the Species"'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Masefield      Print: Book

  

Alexandre Dumas (pere) : The Three Musketeers

'One book... stimulated the poet beyond all others; it became, in a way, a key to the rest of his reading for some time to come. This was George du Maurier's "Trilby". It was not so much the work itself - though John Masefield enjoyed it more than any book he had read until then - which played so prominent a part in forming his tastes, but the other works which George du Maurier put John Masefield on to... Whatever book "Trilby" mentions John Masefield bought... On the oblique recommendations in "Trilby" he read the "Three Musketeers"; Sterne's "Sentimental Journey"; Darwin's "Origin of the Species"'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Masefield      Print: Book

  

George du Maurier : Peter Ibbetson

'After "Trilby" came the effect of "Peter Ibbetson". "It came to me", writes the poet of this book, "just when I needed an inner life". From "Peter Ibbetson" he learned of the existence of Villon and of de Musset. He read these poets but "the time was not ripe for either".

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Masefield      Print: Book

  

Alfred Louis Charles de Musset : 

'After "Trilby" came the effect of "Peter Ibbetson". "It came to me", writes the poet of this book, "just when I needed an inner life". From "Peter Ibbetson" he learned of the existence of Villon and of de Musset. He read these poets but "the time was not ripe for either".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Masefield      Print: Book

  

George Meredith : 

''"My masters... in poetry, were Swinburne and Meredith among the living, Rossetti, Matthew Arnold and Robert Browning among the lately dead. To these I would add Edward Fitzgerald... In prose, the masters were Stendhal, Flaubert, Villiers del'Isle-Adam, Guy de Maupassant, Prosper Merimee and Walter Pater".'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: John Masefield      Print: Book

  

Jean-Marie-Mathias-Philippe-Auguste comte de Villiers de l'Isle-Adam : 

''"My masters... in poetry, were Swinburne and Meredith among the living, Rossetti, Matthew Arnold and Robert Browning among the lately dead. To these I would add Edward Fitzgerald... In prose, the masters were Stendhal, Flaubert, Villiers de l'Isle-Adam, Guy de Maupassant, Prosper Merimee and Walter Pater".'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: John Masefield      Print: Book

  

Guy de Maupassant : 

''"My masters... in poetry, were Swinburne and Meredith among the living, Rossetti, Matthew Arnold and Robert Browning among the lately dead. To these I would add Edward Fitzgerald... In prose, the masters were Stendhal, Flaubert, Villiers de l'Isle-Adam, Guy de Maupassant, Prosper Merimee and Walter Pater".'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: John Masefield      Print: Book

  

Prosper Merimee : 

''"My masters... in poetry, were Swinburne and Meredith among the living, Rossetti, Matthew Arnold and Robert Browning among the lately dead. To these I would add Edward Fitzgerald... In prose, the masters were Stendhal, Flaubert, Villiers de l'Isle-Adam, Guy de Maupassant, Prosper Merimee and Walter Pater".'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: John Masefield      Print: Book

  

William Morris : 

'Before his departure for his native land he had read some of Dickens and Stevenson... and William Morris. John Masefield's debt to William Morris as a constructive thinker is considerable. It may be that Morris has been the formative influence, in his limitations as well as his liberations, on Masefield's view of life'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Masefield      Print: Book

  

James Thomson : Edward and Elinora

[opinion of Thomson's Edward and Elinora, entered in diary]: 'A most affecting tale, pleasingly tender - fraught with virtuous sentiments.'

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Anna Larpent      

  

James Mackintosh : Vindiciae Galliciae

[note in diary upon finishing Mackintosh's "Vindiciae Gallicae"]: 'As far as I am a Judge I think this work very well understood. The author is master on his subject & has the art of rendering others. HE is not scurrilous. He argues well, he seldom begs the question. He narrates what has passed in France, traces causes with precision - perhaps he speaks too strongly in the latter part. I gained much information from his work.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Anna Larpent      Print: Book

  

Lord Monboddo : Of the origin and progress of language

'I went through that extraordinary work of Lord Monboddo on the "Origin of Language". I was entertained and instructed from the singularity of the system, the many erroneous and yet plausible arguments on which it is founded, the infinite display of learning. A mind wedded to antiquity is the source together with a strong imagination easily biased from Credulity, of the principles offered in this work. I should apprehend the criticisms to be good in many parts... There is too much classical learning in it to allow me to form a Judgement of it, as a learned work. Indeed it is not to be supposed I understood it in a followed manner [.] Yet I never throw aside a book because it makes me feel an ignorance I am not ashamed of from its being one belonging to my Sphere as a female. I read on and often reap much information from the mere introduction to scholars.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Anna Larpent      Print: Book

  

Ramsay : a dialogue on taste

[We then read aloud a dialogue on taste by Mr Ramsay, a lively original book with some entertaining and instructive remarks on the progress of those arts that seem particularly to call forth the exertion to taste. I pointed out this, to carry on the pursuit in her mind though on a wholly different principle. Cozens forms beauties by mathematical Rules: reduces all to a regular, invariable System. Ramsay makes beauty the mere result of opinion in different persons, & consequently varying with the various persons he admits of no other standard for taste; the comparisons this difference of opinion drew and the observations that arose, the Books it led us to consult, gave us much amusing conversation.' [reading in turn with her pupil and sister Clara].

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Anna Larpent      Print: Book

  

Sarah Trimmer : Sacred history

'In a ritual that was to be repeated throughout the holidays, Anna and John [her son] read passages from an instructive and improving work, Sarah Trimmer's sacred history, a didactic anthology from the scriptures written by the best-selling pious evangelical.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Larpent      Print: Book

  

Sarah Trimmer : Sacred history

'In a ritual that was to be repeated throughout the holidays, Anna and John [her son] read passages from an instructive and improving work, Sarah Trimmer's sacred history, a didactic anthology from the scriptures written by the best-selling pious evangelical.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Anna Larpent      Print: Book

  

Pierre Marivaux : Marienne

'While her friends were engaged in different sorts of women's work... she read them a great favourite, the sentimental novel "Marienne" by Pierre Marivaux.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Anna Larpent      Print: Book

  

Karl Marx : [unknown]

'The poet Clare Cameron, born Winifred Wells to a London blacksmith, was a 15s a week clerk given to artistic ecstasies... She ate cheap lunches at Lyons to save money for volumes of Tennyson, Shelley and Ruskin. She found the "kindling glow" of words and ideas in Tolstoy, Shaw, Ibsen, Nietzsche, and Marx... Once she read Murger's novel and saw Puccini's opera, she could not turn back: "Ah, THERE was the life we craved. There was expression of and answer to all our fumbling desires and half-formed dreams"...At her first Bohemian party (it was actually in St John's Wood) she was dazzled and intimidated by the easy conversation, the poise, the confidence, the wit'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Clare Cameron      Print: Book

  

Henri Murger : Scenes de la Boheme

'The poet Clare Cameron, born Winifred Wells to a London blacksmith, was a 15s a week clerk given to artistic ecstasies... She ate cheap lunches at Lyons to save money for volumes of Tennyson, Shelley and Ruskin. She found the "kindling glow" of words and ideas in Tolstoy, Shaw, Ibsen, Nietzsche, and Marx... Once she read Murger's novel and saw Puccini's opera, she could not turn back: "Ah, THERE was the life we craved. There was expression of and answer to all our fumbling desires and half-formed dreams"...At her first Bohemian party (it was actually in St John's Wood) she was dazzled and intimidated by the easy conversation, the poise, the confidence, the wit'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Clare Cameron      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Regained

'Soon Pritchett was reading Penny Poets editions of "Paradise Regained", Wordsworth's "Prelude", Cowper, and Coleridge. He formulated plans to become Poet Laureate by age twenty-one'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Victor Sawdon Pritchett      Print: Book

  

George du Maurier : [unknown]

'as an office boy, Pritchett tried to read widely and dreamt of an escape to Bohemia. But his knowledge of the Latin Quarter was gleaned not from Flaubert, only from third-raters like George du Maurier, W.J. Locke, and Hilaire Belloc'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Victor Sawdon Pritchett      Print: Book

  

John Middleton Murry : Wrap me up in my Aubusson Carpet

'When Middleton Murry attacked George Moore in an editorial of the "Adelphi" in April 1924, he [Arnold Bennett] wrote a very strong letter of protest, and rightly: Murry's piece, "Wrap me up in my Aubusson Carpet", had been a characteristically emotional and unbalanced attack . . .'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Arnold Bennett      Print: Serial / periodical

  

William MacDougall : Psychology

'With autodidact diligence [Leslie Paul] closed in on the avant-garde. He read "Prufrock" and "The Waste Land", though not until the 1930s. He smuggled "Ulysses" and "Lady Chatterley's Lover" past customs. In "John O'London's" and "The Nation", in William MacDougall's Home University Library volume on "Psychology" and F.A. Servante's "Psychology of the Boy", he read up on Freud. In a few years he knew enough to ghost-write BBC lectures on modern psychology'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Leslie Paul      Print: Book

  

Walt Whitman : [unknown]

'After Stalingrad, [Bernard Kops] immersed himself in Russian literature. A GI dating his sister introduced him to Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Bernard Kops      Print: Book

  

Michel de Montaigne : Essays

"In 1617 the Countess [of Dorset, Pembroke, and Montgomery] noted recreational books that she was reading: "'Began to have Mr. Sandy's book read to me about the Government of the Turks. "'Rivers used to read to me in Montaigne's Plays [Essays] and Moll Neville in the Fairy Queen. "'I sat and read much in the Turkish History and Chaucer. "'The 12th and 13th I spent most of the time in playing Glecko and hearing Moll Neville read the Arcadia.'"

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Rivers      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

'There is a pleasant story of how [Aunt Cara] once set a Jebb niece to read "Paradise Lost" aloud to herself and her sister Aunt Polly, in order to improve Aunt Polly's mind. The poor old lady was terribly bored and was nearly asleep, when Aunt Cara woke her up, by saying sternly: "Listen now, Polly; it's Satan speaking".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: [unknown] Jebb      Print: Book

  

William Morris : 

'Uncle Richard had adored Ruskin, and worshipped Morris, and had slept for years with a copy of "In Memoriam" under his pillow. He told me once how he and his friends used to wait outside the bookshops in the early morning, when they heard that a new volume of Tennyson was to come out. He had read all Browning too, and all Wordsworth, and Carlyle, in fact nearly everything contemporary; and he constantly re-read the Classics in their own classic tongues... a triumph of timing occurred once when he was listening to the Thunderstorm in the Pastoral Symphony, and reading the thunderstorm in "Oedipus at Colonus", and a real thunderstorm took place!'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Richard Litchfield      Print: Book

  

Frederick Marryat : Masterman Ready

'Lovely books she read to us...:"The Wide Wide World", with all the religion and deaths from consumption left out, and all the farm life and good country food left in; "Masterman Ready", with that ass Mr Seagrave mitigated, and dear old Ready not killed by the savages; "Settlers at Home", with the baby not allowed to die; "The Little Duke" with horrid little Carloman spared to grow more virtuous still; "The Children of the New Forest"; "The Runaway"; "The Princess and the Goblin", and many more'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henrietta Litchfield      Print: Book

  

Harriet Martineau : Settlers at Home

'Lovely books she read to us...:"The Wide Wide World", with all the religion and deaths from consumption left out, and all the farm life and good country food left in; "Masterman Ready", with that ass Mr Seagrave mitigated, and dear old Ready not killed by the savages; "Settlers at Home", with the baby not allowed to die; "The Little Duke" with horrid little Carloman spared to grow more virtuous still; "The Children of the New Forest"; "The Runaway"; "The Princess and the Goblin", and many more'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henrietta Litchfield      Print: Book

  

Frederick Marryat : The Children of the New Forest

'Lovely books she read to us...:"The Wide Wide World", with all the religion and deaths from consumption left out, and all the farm life and good country food left in; "Masterman Ready", with that ass Mr Seagrave mitigated, and dear old Ready not killed by the savages; "Settlers at Home", with the baby not allowed to die; "The Little Duke" with horrid little Carloman spared to grow more virtuous still; "The Children of the New Forest"; "The Runaway"; "The Princess and the Goblin", and many more'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henrietta Litchfield      Print: Book

  

George Macdonald : The Princess and the Goblin

'Lovely books she read to us...:"The Wide Wide World", with all the religion and deaths from consumption left out, and all the farm life and good country food left in; "Masterman Ready", with that ass Mr Seagrave mitigated, and dear old Ready not killed by the savages; "Settlers at Home", with the baby not allowed to die; "The Little Duke" with horrid little Carloman spared to grow more virtuous still; "The Children of the New Forest"; "The Runaway"; "The Princess and the Goblin", and many more'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henrietta Litchfield      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

'At home all day. In the even read the 9th book of "Paradise Lost".'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Turner      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

'Read the 10th book of "Paradise Lost" in the even.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Turner      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Regained

'At home all day. In the even read the 11th and 12th books of "Paradise Regained", which I think is much inferior for the sublimity of style to "Paradise Lost".'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Turner      Print: Book

  

W Somerset Maugham : Cakes and Ale

'He returned to London to . . . Somerset Maugham's "Cakes and Ale", which he admired . . .'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Arnold Bennett      Print: Book

  

William Derham : Physico-Theology

'At home all day. Not at church all day. Read part of Boyle's lectures and Smart's poem on eternity and immensity.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Turner      Print: Book

  

Christopher Smart : On the eternity of the Supreme Being: a poetical essay

'At home all day. Not at church all day. Read part of Boyle's lectures and Smart's poem on eternity and immensity.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Turner      Print: Book

  

William Derham : Physico-Theology

'In the even read Derham's "Sermons at Boyle's Lectures", wherein I find a man evacuates as much in one day by insensible perspiration as in 14 by stool.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Turner      Print: Book

  

William Smellie : Philosophy of Natural History

[in April 1792 Larpent read] 'Smellie's "Philosophy of Nature" [sic] which she considered poorly organized but of sufficient value to transcribe extracts for her children.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Anna Larpent      Print: Book

  

Hannah More : Percy

'The story of Percy is simple, pathetic, distressing, this worked up to the most moving height of distress; the power of virtue on the mind is well contrasted with the mad way of passion, Elwina's is an almost perfect character... A pure love of virtue appearing throughout and filling the virtuous heart with glowing pleasure... the struggle in Elwina's mind between love and duty is fine, the triumph of the latter nobly painted. There is a charming delicacy, and elevation of sentiment.' [opinion of More's "Percy" entered in diary].

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Anna Larpent      Print: Book

  

Charlotte Smith : Desmond

'With a fine imagination and command of Language Charlotte Smith cannot write without Interest [.] this is an odd work. She introduces in a prettily wrought novel the more early French troubles in consequence of the Revolution, she is a wild leveller. She defends the revolution, she writes with the enthusiasm of a woman and a poetess. Her story is hurried [,] has faults in the conduct and narrative, yet it interests. Her descriptions are very pleasing and her characteristic conversations are somewhat forced. She writes herself out. yet her genius predominates.' [opinion of "Desmond", entered in diary].

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Anna Larpent      Print: Book

  

William Derham : Physico-Theology

'At home all day. On reading Derham's notes on Boyle's lectures I find he says that Mr Boyle demonstrates that so slender a wire may be drawn from gold that from once ounce of gold a wire may be drawn 777,600 feet in length or 155 miles and a half. In the even Tho. Davy here and supped with us and stayed until 11 o'clock but drunk nothing, only 1 pint of mild beer. We read Smart's poems on immensity, omniscience and power.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Turner      Print: Book

  

Christopher Smart : On the immensity of the Supreme Being: a poetical essay

'At home all day. On reading Derham's notes on Boyle's lectures I find he says that Mr Boyle demonstrates that so slender a wire may be drawn from gold that from once ounce of gold a wire may be drawn 777,600 feet in length or 155 miles and a half. In the even Tho. Davy here and supped with us and stayed until 11 o'clock but drunk nothing, only 1 pint of mild beer. We read Smart's poems on immensity, omniscience and power.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Turner      Print: Book

  

Charlotte Smith : Letters of a Solitary Wanderer

'In 1816, left alone in Bath by her husband, Mary Shelley records reading "The Solitary Wanderer", Charlotte Smith's "Letters of a Solitary Wanderer" (1799), a collection of interlocking tales in which a number of suffering women relate their stories. It is the single occasion her comprehensive reading diary mentions this book, which she seems to choose at this point to express a resentful, self-pitying protest against her desertion.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Shelley      Print: Book

  

James Thomson : Seasons, The

[Marginalia]: a few pencil marginal marks (in form of bracketed lines of text eg p 79 has lines 203-7 bracketed), plus some ms notes in ink on binding page. The ink notes read 'Envy-Love 78'; 'Hope - Grief 78'; 'The Deluge 79'; 'Effects of changing weather 80'.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

Homer : Odyssey

'In reading the "Odyssey" last night among many curious passages these two lines I think applicable to the present times, Viz, "why cease ye then ye wreath of Heaven to stay; be humbled all and Lead ye great the way".'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Turner      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

'in the Even Tho. Davy at our House to whom I read the 4th Book of Milton's "Paradise Lost".'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Turner      Print: Book

  

Homer : Odyssey

'In the even read 2 books of Homer's "Odyssey", translated by Pope.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Turner      Print: Book

  

Homer : Odyssey

'Came home about 8.10. Read part of Homer's "Odyssey".'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Turner      Print: Book

  

Homer : Odyssey

'After supper read the 13th book of Homer's "Odyssey", wherein I think the soliloquy which Ulysses makes when he finds the Phaeacians have, in his sleep, left him on shore with all his treasure, and on his native shore of Ithaca (though not known to him), contains a very good lesson of morality.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Turner      Print: Book

  

Joseph Emin : The life and adventures of Joseph Emin, an Armenian. Written in English by himself

[Marginalia]: one ms note at the end of the text: 'You are a story [?] teller I ... said Mr Joseph Emin'. Some of the page is missing.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Drummond Erskine      Print: Book

  

Tobias Smollett : Roderick Random

'Carter and Talbot read fiction and corresponded about it, including "Roderick Random", the novels of Eliza Haywood, French romances, and Charlotte Lennox's "Henrietta", in which Talbot funds a number of objectionable qualities including "irreligion" and "the pride and sauciness" of the heroine. Their "favourite" among women novelists was Sarah Fielding, many of whose works they read and discussed.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Catherine Talbot      Print: Book

  

Helen Maria Williams : various books

'[Carter] is sympathetic to women of different views, like Charlotte Smith or Helen Maria Williams whose books she finds "too democratical" but praises as "exprest with decency and moderation" and "very prettily written".'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Carter      Print: Book

  

Homer : Odyssey

'At home all day... In reading Homer's "Odyssey", I think the character which Menelaus gives Telemachus of Ulysses, when he is a-speaking of his war-like virtues in the 4th book, is very good.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Turner      Print: Book

  

Alexander Macaulay : A dictionary of medicine, designed for popular use

[Marginalia]: p. 465 has a bookmark and marginal mark against item 'Regimen'; opposite the half-title there is reference to another medical work 'An Essay on The Action of Medicines in the system, or: on the Mode in which Therapeutic Agents introduced in the Stomack ... awarded ... Frederick William [Headland] ...'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Magdalene Sharpe Erskine      Print: Book

  

James Thomson : Seasons, The

[Maud Montgomery] 'wrote her first poem after reading "Seasons", a book of poems by James Thomson, written in blank verse. Maud was so enraptured by them that she had to sit down at once to write one of her own.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Lucy Maud Montgomery      Print: Book

  

Ralph Waldo Emerson : [Essays]

'Along with her old school books [Maud Montgomery] read whatever she could find both for pleasure and to learn from their authors how to improve her own writing: religious tracts, newspapers, the Godey's Lady's Book, Charles Dickens's "Pickwick Papers", Sir Walter Scott's novels, Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The House of the Seven Gables", Washington Irving's "The Sketchbook", and Ralph Waldo Emerson's essays.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Lucy Maud Montgomery      Print: Book

  

Robert Lambe : An exact and circumstantial history of the battle of Floddon in verse written about the time of Queen Elizabeth. In which are related many particular facts not to be found in the English history[...]

[Marginalia]: ms note on binding page appears to refer both to the battle of Flodden and to poems about it: '... The battle of Flodden Field which was fought between the English under the Earl of Surrey ( in the absence of Henery 8th) and the Scots under their valiant King James IV who was slain on the field of battle in the year 1513. An ... poem ... collected from .... ms by Joseph Philamoth ... These three poems differ ... from each other. British Topography Chpt. [?] p. 61'.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anon      Print: Book

  

John Flamsteed : astronomical calculations (lunar positions)

"When [Isaac] Newton arrived at Greenwich in September 1694, the astronomer [John Flamsteed] showed him 157 lunar positions calculated at the observatory ... Newton asked permission to take copies of them."

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Isaac Newton      Manuscript: Unknown

  

John Flamsteed : sections of catalogue of stars

Adrian Johns discusses John Flamsteed's reading of sheets 1 and 3 of his star catalogue (submitted for printing without his authorisation, and much added to), apparently supplied to him by printing-house staff.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Flamsteed      Print: sheets

  

John Flamsteed : catalogue of stars

Adrian Johns describes how "[Edmond] Halley ... [took] to 'correcting' the copy [of John Flamsteed's star catalogue] in Child's coffeehouse, and pointing out to his 'impious friends' there all Flamsteed's purported errors."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Edmond Halley      

  

John Flamsteed : Atlas Coelestis

"As late as 1782 ... [Caroline Herschel] would employ a telescope to 'sweep' the sky for comets, with her brother William seated beside her. William helped her attain the vital skill of correlating in an instant what she observed in the sky with its representation in the Atlas [Coelestis] lying open beside her."

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Caroline and William Herschel     Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

'In the even read the 6th book of Milton's "Paradise Lost".'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Turner      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

'In the even read the 12th and last book of Milton's "Paradise Lost", which I have now read twice through and in my opinion it exceeds anything I ever read for sublimity of language and beauty of similes; and I think the depravity of human nature entailed upon us by our first parent is finely drawn.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Turner      Print: Book

  

Thomas Salmon : A critical essay concerning marriage

'Read part of Salmon "On Marriage".'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Turner      Print: Book

  

Thomas Salmon : A critical essay concerning marriage

'In the even finished reading Salmon "On Marriage", which I think to be a very indifferent thing, for the author appears to me to be a very bad logician.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Turner      Print: Book

  

Prosper Merimee : unknown

Noted by Leon Edel in "Brief Chronology" of Henry James: "1860: Returns to Newport ... Reads Balzac and Merimee."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Unknown

  

Lady Mary Wortley Montagu : Letters

Henry James to Thomas Sergeant Perry, from home of host family in Bonn, Sunday 5 August 1860: "[on Wednesday morning] I sat down to read [in the study] till our room should be made ready for me to go in and set to work. I looked over an old volume of the 'British Chronicle,' a lot of bound weekly newspapers of the time of Byron, Shelley, Tom Moore and Walter Scott and which I had discovered in a corner the night before. Then I finished the Letters of Lady M. W. Montague which I had commenced a few days before from curiosity and had continued from interest."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Book

  

William Camden : The history of the most renowned and victorious princess Elizabeth, late Queen of England

[Marginalia]: ms annotations in form of numbers in margin from p.27- p.655 - as if reference system (they are in numerical order); there are also a few marginal notes in the introduction (unnumbered) and on p. 41 e.g. the text line 'Queen Mary herself, (naturally* a mild and loving Princess ....)' has ms note in margin '*false'; Text line '.. before amply conferred on Henry the Eighth, and the Queen* herself ...' has ms note '* therefore has the Popes Promd, not his obliging temper that made him do this ...'

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Fox      Print: Book

  

Henry James : Review of Matthew Arnold, Essays in Criticism

Leon Edel notes re Henry James's unsigned review of Matthew Arnold, Essays in Criticism, in North American Review (July 1865): "Arnold read this review and praised it to his friends unaware it was the work of a twenty-two-year-old novice."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Matthew Arnold      Print: Serial / periodical

  

William James : Review of Herman Grimm, Unuberwundliche Machte

Henry James to William James, 22 November 1867: "I recd. about a fortnight ago -- your letter with the review of Grimm's novel ... I liked your article very much ... It struck me as ... very readable. I copied it forthwith and sent it to the Nation."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Manuscript: Letter

  

William Morris : The Earthly Paradise

Henry James to Alice James, in letter begun 10 March 1869 (continued on 12 March), on evening spent at home of William Morris: "After dinner (we stayed to dinner, Miss Grace, Miss S. S. and I,) Morris read us one of his unpublished poems, from the second series of his 'un-Earthly Paradise,' and his wife having a bad toothache, lay on the sofa, with her handkerchief to her face."

Unknown
Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: William Morris      

  

Michel de Montaigne : Essays

'After the breakdown of her marriage in 1752, Sarah Scott read voraciously and eclectically, the "History of Florence" and Lord Bacon's essays, and the Old Plays, Christianity not founded on argument, Randolph's answer to it... and some of David's Simple Life... an account of the Government of Venice, Montaigne's Essays.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Sarah Scott      Print: Book

  

Niccolo Machiavelli : History of Florence

'After the breakdown of her marriage in 1752, Sarah Scott read voraciously and eclectically, the "History of Florence" and Lord Bacon's essays, and the Old Plays, Christianity not founded on argument, Randolph's answer to it... and some of David's Simple Life... an account of the Government of Venice, Montaigne's Essays.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Sarah Scott      Print: Book

  

Tobias Smollet : Roderick Random

'Carter and Talbot read fiction and corresponded about it, including "Roderick Random", the novels of Eliza Haywood, French romances, and Charlotte Lennox's "Henrietta", in which Talbot finds a number of objectionable qualities including "irreligion" and "the pride and sauciness" of the heroine. Their "favourite" among women novelists was Sarah Fielding, many of whose works they read and discussed.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Carter      Print: Book

  

Elizabeth Hamilton : Memoirs of modern philosophers

'In December 1810 a box of books arrived and the family began to read a novel which they "liked very much". This book is "Modern Philosophy", whose anti-heroine, "Miss Biddy Botherin", who made them "laugh a good deal", is a devotee of radical Godwinian philosophy, a satirical portrait probably combining elements of Mary Hays and Mary Wollstonecraft.' [Grove is resisting her then-fiance Shelley's philosophy and aesthetics].

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Grove      Print: Book

  

Sophia Westcomb : [letter]

'While I read [your letter], I have you before me in person: I converse with you and your dear Anna, as arm in arm you traverse the happy terrace...'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Richardson      Manuscript: Letter, Unknown

  

Charlotte Smith : Emmeline

'[Pennington] emphasises... that she "highly disapproved" the novels of Charlotte Smith, believing their morality "very defective" if not "positively bad" (Memoirs, p. 299). Carter's letters however show enthusiasm at least for "Emmeline", and deep sympathy for Smith's domestic situation: she tries hard to be fair even to the "democratic" Desmond, suggesting its critics are "perhaps prejudiced against it", while she has found the included poems "very beautiful" (Letters... to Mrs Montagu, vol III, 295-333)'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Carter      Print: Book

  

Charlotte Smith : Desmond

'[Pennington] emphasises... that she "highly disapproved" the novels of Charlotte Smith, believing their morality "very defective" if not "positively bad" (Memoirs, p. 299). Carter's letters however show enthusiasm at least for "Emmeline", and deep sympathy for Smith's domestic situation: she tries hard to be fair even to the "democratic" Desmond, suggesting its critics are "perhaps prejudiced against it", while she has found the included poems "very beautiful" (Letters... to Mrs Montagu, vol III, 295-333)'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Carter      Print: Book

  

Henry James Sr : "reply to a 'Swedenborgian'"

Henry James to William James, 1 January 1870 (letter begun 27 December 1869): " ... I felt a most refreshing blast of paternity, the other day in reading Father's reply to a 'Swedenborgian,' in a number [of The Nation] that I saw at the bankers."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Richard Wiseman : Several Chirurgical Treatises

'In the even read part of Wiseman's "Chyrurgery".'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Turner      Print: Book

  

William Derham : Physico-Theology

'In the even read part of Derham's "Physico-Theology".'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Turner      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

'I wish you would cannonade this N[ewto]n. I cannot bear, that another of Apollo's genuine Offspring should pass down to future Times with such crude and unworthy Notes.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Richardson      Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

Henry James Sr : articles on Swedenborg

Henry James to Henry James Sr, 14 January 1870: "With your letter [of 22 December 1869] came two Nations, with your Swedenborgian letters, which I had already seen and I think mentioned. I read at the same time in an Atlantic borrowed from the Nortons, your article on the woman business ... your Atlantic article I decidedly liked ..."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Henry James Sr : "Is Marriage Holy?"

Henry James to Henry James Sr, 14 January 1870: "With your letter [of 22 December 1869] came two Nations, with your Swedenborgian letters, which I had already seen and I think mentioned. I read at the same time in an Atlantic borrowed from the Nortons, your article on the woman business ... your Atlantic article I decidedly liked ..."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Serial / periodical

  

J. Morley : article on Byron

Henry James, in letter to Charles Eliot Norton, 16 January 1871, mentions "just having read in the Fortnightly for December two articles by your two friends F. Harrison and J. Morley, on Bismark and Byron respectively."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Serial / periodical

  

William James : Review of Hippolyte Taine, "On Intelligence"

Henry James to William James, 28 September 1872 (letter begun 22 September): "I read your Taine and admired, though but imperfectly understood it."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Unknown

  

Henry James Sr : anecdote/account ("story of Mr Webster")

Henry James to Mrs Henry James Sr, 24 March 1873: "Thank him [Henry James Sr] ... greatly for his story of Mr Webster. It is admirable material, and excellently presented: I have transcribed it in my notebook with religious care, and think that some day something will come of it."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Manuscript: Sheet

  

William James : "criticism of Middlemarch"

Henry James to William James, 9 April 1873: "Your letter was full of points of great interest. Your criticism on Middlemarch was excellent and I have duly transcribed it into that note-book which it will be a relief to your mind to know I have at last set up."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Manuscript: Letter

  

Conyers Middleton : History of the Life of Marcus Tullius Cicero

'The fault of the great author, whose letters to his friend you have been reading, is, that Tully is wholly concerned for the fame of Cicero; and that for fame and self-exaltation sake. In some of his orations, what is called his vehemence (but really is too often insult and ill manners) so transports him, that a modern pleader... would not be heard, if he were to take the like freedoms... Cicero's constitutional faults seem to be vanity and cowardice. Great geniuses seldom have small faults. You have seen, I presume, Dr Middleton's "Life of Cicero". It is a fine piece; but the Doctor, I humbly think, has played the panegyrist, in some places in it, rather than the historian. The present laureat's performance on the same subject, of which Dr Middleton's is the foundation, is a spirited and pretty piece... You greatly oblige me, Madam, whenever you give me your observations upon what you read'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Richardson      Print: Book

  

Oliver Goldsmith : Vicar of Wakefield

'His plan was to make use of me as a talking dictionary and grammar, confining my teachings exclusively to the answering of such questions as he thought fit to put. Having made this arrangement he produced a copy of the "Vicar of Wakefield", and, commencing at the title-page, read it after me, looking to me for translation as he went along. In this way we got through four or five pages in the course of the first hour.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

Henry James : Eugene Pickering

Henry James to William Dean Howells, 9 January 1874, regarding first half of "tale" (Eugene Pickering) being sent in separate cover: "I have been reading it to my brother who pronounces it 'quite brilliant.'"

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Robert Thomas : The modern practice of physic, exhibiting the characters, causes, symptoms, prognostic, morbid appearances, and improved method of treating, the diseases of all climates

[Marginalia]: pencil annotations on last binding page are in Latin and appear to be brief notes relating to 4 classes of disorders.

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: Anon      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

''When I was seven years old [...] I was kept from chapel one Sunday afternoon by some ailment or other. When the door closed behind the other chapel-goers, I looked at the books on the table. The ugliest-looking of them was turned down open; and my turning it up was one of the leading incidents of my life. That plain, clumsy, calf-bound volume was "Paradise Lost";...there was something about Satan cleaving Chaos, which made me turn to the poetry; and my mental destiny was fixed for the next seven years.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Print: Book

  

Axel Munthe : Story of San Michele, The

'Another lovely book called "The Story of San Michele".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Henry Williamson : Dandelion Days

'Read most of day. I am reading "Dandelion Days", and love it. I must get some more of the Henry Williamson books.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Richmal Crompton : Old Man's Birthday, The

[alone in the sick bay] 'Read "Old Man's Birthday".

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Ernest Seton Thompson : Trail of the Sandhill Stag, The

[alone in the sick bay] 'Read "Kidnapped". Not up to much... Dr came and said I couldn't go down [into lessons] until Monday. Damn. Felt miserable. Read "Trail of the Sandhill Stag" and tidied out the book cupboard.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

R.D. Blackmore : Lorna Doone

'Read "Lorna Doone" and loved it. Must try to get it next hols.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Eleanor Smith : Man in Grey, The

'I read "The Man in Grey" which is simply glorious. I must ry and get it.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Eleanor Smith : Lover's Meeting

[List of books read in 1943, in diary for 1943]: 'The Farthing Spinster; Guy Mannering; Whereas I was Blind; And So to Bath; The Story of San Michele; Attack Alarm; The Murders in Praed Street; Lover's Meeting; The Secret Battle; Witch Wood; MD - Doctor of Murder; Murder at the Keyhole; That Girl Ginger; Ten Minute Alibi; Diary of a District Officer; Tarzan the Untamed; Peter Abelard; Pip; Pied Piper; A Man Lay Dead; Random Harvest; Madame Curie; Stalky and Co; Bellarion; Down the Garden Path; The Three Musketeers vol 1; The House in Cornwall; A Tall Ship; The Two Saplings; Farewell Victoria; Quinneys; House of Terror; Penguin Parade 4; Guy Mannering[presumably a re-reading]; The Man Born to be King; Casterton Papers; Old Saint Paul's; The Moon is Down; 1066 and all That; My Brother Jonathon; Gulliver's Travels; Ensign Knightley; Men Against Death; Fame is the Spur; Gone with the Wind; Mesmer; First Nights; The Hound of the Baskervilles; Little Gidding; Beau Geste; Beau Sabreur; The Amazing Theatre; The Pleasure of Your Company; Dandelion Days; Humour and Fantasy; Juno and the Paycock; The Beautiful Years; Teach Yourself to Think; Salar the Salmon; The Cathedral; The Mysterious Mr I; The Picts and the Martyrs; The Dream of Fair Women; The Star-born; Three Short Stories; A Thatched Roof; The Surgeon's Log; The Healing Knife; Nine Ghosts; While Rome Burns; The Star Spangled Manner; The Day Must Dawn; The Tower of London; Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde; The Old Man's Birthday; A little Princess; Ego 5; The Lighter Side of School Life; Kidnapped; The Trail of the Sandhill Stag; Ballet Lover's Notebook; Lorna Doone; The Plays of JM Barrie; Jane Eyre; I'll Leave it to You; Henry Fifth; Longer Poems; Antony and Cleopatra; The Man in Grey; The House in Dormer Forest; The Writing of English; Miss Mapp; The Song of Bernadette; Happy and Glorious; Sixty Poems; The Birth of Romance; The Comedy of Life; Some Little Tales; Dream Days; Royal Flush.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Dora Olive Thompson : That Girl Ginger

[List of books read in 1943, in diary for 1943]: 'The Farthing Spinster; Guy Mannering; Whereas I was Blind; And So to Bath; The Story of San Michele; Attack Alarm; The Murders in Praed Street; Lover's Meeting; The Secret Battle; Witch Wood; MD - Doctor of Murder; Murder at the Keyhole; That Girl Ginger; Ten Minute Alibi; Diary of a District Officer; Tarzan the Untamed; Peter Abelard; Pip; Pied Piper; A Man Lay Dead; Random Harvest; Madame Curie; Stalky and Co; Bellarion; Down the Garden Path; The Three Musketeers vol 1; The House in Cornwall; A Tall Ship; The Two Saplings; Farewell Victoria; Quinneys; House of Terror; Penguin Parade 4; Guy Mannering[presumably a re-reading]; The Man Born to be King; Casterton Papers; Old Saint Paul's; The Moon is Down; 1066 and all That; My Brother Jonathon; Gulliver's Travels; Ensign Knightley; Men Against Death; Fame is the Spur; Gone with the Wind; Mesmer; First Nights; The Hound of the Baskervilles; Little Gidding; Beau Geste; Beau Sabreur; The Amazing Theatre; The Pleasure of Your Company; Dandelion Days; Humour and Fantasy; Juno and the Paycock; The Beautiful Years; Teach Yourself to Think; Salar the Salmon; The Cathedral; The Mysterious Mr I; The Picts and the Martyrs; The Dream of Fair Women; The Star-born; Three Short Stories; A Thatched Roof; The Surgeon's Log; The Healing Knife; Nine Ghosts; While Rome Burns; The Star Spangled Manner; The Day Must Dawn; The Tower of London; Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde; The Old Man's Birthday; A little Princess; Ego 5; The Lighter Side of School Life; Kidnapped; The Trail of the Sandhill Stag; Ballet Lover's Notebook; Lorna Doone; The Plays of JM Barrie; Jane Eyre; I'll Leave it to You; Henry Fifth; Longer Poems; Antony and Cleopatra; The Man in Grey; The House in Dormer Forest; The Writing of English; Miss Mapp; The Song of Bernadette; Happy and Glorious; Sixty Poems; The Birth of Romance; The Comedy of Life; Some Little Tales; Dream Days; Royal Flush.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Anthony Armstrong : Ten Minute Alibi

[List of books read in 1943, in diary for 1943]: 'The Farthing Spinster; Guy Mannering; Whereas I was Blind; And So to Bath; The Story of San Michele; Attack Alarm; The Murders in Praed Street; Lover's Meeting; The Secret Battle; Witch Wood; MD - Doctor of Murder; Murder at the Keyhole; That Girl Ginger; Ten Minute Alibi; Diary of a District Officer; Tarzan the Untamed; Peter Abelard; Pip; Pied Piper; A Man Lay Dead; Random Harvest; Madame Curie; Stalky and Co; Bellarion; Down the Garden Path; The Three Musketeers vol 1; The House in Cornwall; A Tall Ship; The Two Saplings; Farewell Victoria; Quinneys; House of Terror; Penguin Parade 4; Guy Mannering[presumably a re-reading]; The Man Born to be King; Casterton Papers; Old Saint Paul's; The Moon is Down; 1066 and all That; My Brother Jonathon; Gulliver's Travels; Ensign Knightley; Men Against Death; Fame is the Spur; Gone with the Wind; Mesmer; First Nights; The Hound of the Baskervilles; Little Gidding; Beau Geste; Beau Sabreur; The Amazing Theatre; The Pleasure of Your Company; Dandelion Days; Humour and Fantasy; Juno and the Paycock; The Beautiful Years; Teach Yourself to Think; Salar the Salmon; The Cathedral; The Mysterious Mr I; The Picts and the Martyrs; The Dream of Fair Women; The Star-born; Three Short Stories; A Thatched Roof; The Surgeon's Log; The Healing Knife; Nine Ghosts; While Rome Burns; The Star Spangled Manner; The Day Must Dawn; The Tower of London; Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde; The Old Man's Birthday; A little Princess; Ego 5; The Lighter Side of School Life; Kidnapped; The Trail of the Sandhill Stag; Ballet Lover's Notebook; Lorna Doone; The Plays of JM Barrie; Jane Eyre; I'll Leave it to You; Henry Fifth; Longer Poems; Antony and Cleopatra; The Man in Grey; The House in Dormer Forest; The Writing of English; Miss Mapp; The Song of Bernadette; Happy and Glorious; Sixty Poems; The Birth of Romance; The Comedy of Life; Some Little Tales; Dream Days; Royal Flush.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Ngaio Marsh : Man Lay Dead, A

[List of books read in 1943, in diary for 1943]: 'The Farthing Spinster; Guy Mannering; Whereas I was Blind; And So to Bath; The Story of San Michele; Attack Alarm; The Murders in Praed Street; Lover's Meeting; The Secret Battle; Witch Wood; MD - Doctor of Murder; Murder at the Keyhole; That Girl Ginger; Ten Minute Alibi; Diary of a District Officer; Tarzan the Untamed; Peter Abelard; Pip; Pied Piper; A Man Lay Dead; Random Harvest; Madame Curie; Stalky and Co; Bellarion; Down the Garden Path; The Three Musketeers vol 1; The House in Cornwall; A Tall Ship; The Two Saplings; Farewell Victoria; Quinneys; House of Terror; Penguin Parade 4; Guy Mannering[presumably a re-reading]; The Man Born to be King; Casterton Papers; Old Saint Paul's; The Moon is Down; 1066 and all That; My Brother Jonathon; Gulliver's Travels; Ensign Knightley; Men Against Death; Fame is the Spur; Gone with the Wind; Mesmer; First Nights; The Hound of the Baskervilles; Little Gidding; Beau Geste; Beau Sabreur; The Amazing Theatre; The Pleasure of Your Company; Dandelion Days; Humour and Fantasy; Juno and the Paycock; The Beautiful Years; Teach Yourself to Think; Salar the Salmon; The Cathedral; The Mysterious Mr I; The Picts and the Martyrs; The Dream of Fair Women; The Star-born; Three Short Stories; A Thatched Roof; The Surgeon's Log; The Healing Knife; Nine Ghosts; While Rome Burns; The Star Spangled Manner; The Day Must Dawn; The Tower of London; Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde; The Old Man's Birthday; A little Princess; Ego 5; The Lighter Side of School Life; Kidnapped; The Trail of the Sandhill Stag; Ballet Lover's Notebook; Lorna Doone; The Plays of JM Barrie; Jane Eyre; I'll Leave it to You; Henry Fifth; Longer Poems; Antony and Cleopatra; The Man in Grey; The House in Dormer Forest; The Writing of English; Miss Mapp; The Song of Bernadette; Happy and Glorious; Sixty Poems; The Birth of Romance; The Comedy of Life; Some Little Tales; Dream Days; Royal Flush.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Alexandre Dumas : The Three Musketeers

[List of books read in 1943, in diary for 1943]: 'The Farthing Spinster; Guy Mannering; Whereas I was Blind; And So to Bath; The Story of San Michele; Attack Alarm; The Murders in Praed Street; Lover's Meeting; The Secret Battle; Witch Wood; MD - Doctor of Murder; Murder at the Keyhole; That Girl Ginger; Ten Minute Alibi; Diary of a District Officer; Tarzan the Untamed; Peter Abelard; Pip; Pied Piper; A Man Lay Dead; Random Harvest; Madame Curie; Stalky and Co; Bellarion; Down the Garden Path; The Three Musketeers vol 1; The House in Cornwall; A Tall Ship; The Two Saplings; Farewell Victoria; Quinneys; House of Terror; Penguin Parade 4; Guy Mannering[presumably a re-reading]; The Man Born to be King; Casterton Papers; Old Saint Paul's; The Moon is Down; 1066 and all That; My Brother Jonathon; Gulliver's Travels; Ensign Knightley; Men Against Death; Fame is the Spur; Gone with the Wind; Mesmer; First Nights; The Hound of the Baskervilles; Little Gidding; Beau Geste; Beau Sabreur; The Amazing Theatre; The Pleasure of Your Company; Dandelion Days; Humour and Fantasy; Juno and the Paycock; The Beautiful Years; Teach Yourself to Think; Salar the Salmon; The Cathedral; The Mysterious Mr I; The Picts and the Martyrs; The Dream of Fair Women; The Star-born; Three Short Stories; A Thatched Roof; The Surgeon's Log; The Healing Knife; Nine Ghosts; While Rome Burns; The Star Spangled Manner; The Day Must Dawn; The Tower of London; Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde; The Old Man's Birthday; A little Princess; Ego 5; The Lighter Side of School Life; Kidnapped; The Trail of the Sandhill Stag; Ballet Lover's Notebook; Lorna Doone; The Plays of JM Barrie; Jane Eyre; I'll Leave it to You; Henry Fifth; Longer Poems; Antony and Cleopatra; The Man in Grey; The House in Dormer Forest; The Writing of English; Miss Mapp; The Song of Bernadette; Happy and Glorious; Sixty Poems; The Birth of Romance; The Comedy of Life; Some Little Tales; Dream Days; Royal Flush.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

"Bartimeus" : Tall Ship, A

[List of books read in 1943, in diary for 1943]: 'The Farthing Spinster; Guy Mannering; Whereas I was Blind; And So to Bath; The Story of San Michele; Attack Alarm; The Murders in Praed Street; Lover's Meeting; The Secret Battle; Witch Wood; MD - Doctor of Murder; Murder at the Keyhole; That Girl Ginger; Ten Minute Alibi; Diary of a District Officer; Tarzan the Untamed; Peter Abelard; Pip; Pied Piper; A Man Lay Dead; Random Harvest; Madame Curie; Stalky and Co; Bellarion; Down the Garden Path; The Three Musketeers vol 1; The House in Cornwall; A Tall Ship; The Two Saplings; Farewell Victoria; Quinneys; House of Terror; Penguin Parade 4; Guy Mannering[presumably a re-reading]; The Man Born to be King; Casterton Papers; Old Saint Paul's; The Moon is Down; 1066 and all That; My Brother Jonathon; Gulliver's Travels; Ensign Knightley; Men Against Death; Fame is the Spur; Gone with the Wind; Mesmer; First Nights; The Hound of the Baskervilles; Little Gidding; Beau Geste; Beau Sabreur; The Amazing Theatre; The Pleasure of Your Company; Dandelion Days; Humour and Fantasy; Juno and the Paycock; The Beautiful Years; Teach Yourself to Think; Salar the Salmon; The Cathedral; The Mysterious Mr I; The Picts and the Martyrs; The Dream of Fair Women; The Star-born; Three Short Stories; A Thatched Roof; The Surgeon's Log; The Healing Knife; Nine Ghosts; While Rome Burns; The Star Spangled Manner; The Day Must Dawn; The Tower of London; Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde; The Old Man's Birthday; A little Princess; Ego 5; The Lighter Side of School Life; Kidnapped; The Trail of the Sandhill Stag; Ballet Lover's Notebook; Lorna Doone; The Plays of JM Barrie; Jane Eyre; I'll Leave it to You; Henry Fifth; Longer Poems; Antony and Cleopatra; The Man in Grey; The House in Dormer Forest; The Writing of English; Miss Mapp; The Song of Bernadette; Happy and Glorious; Sixty Poems; The Birth of Romance; The Comedy of Life; Some Little Tales; Dream Days; Royal Flush.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Robert Jameson : Unknown

'With regard to reading, you would think I have enough of time upon my hands at present: yet the truth is, I have often read more, almost never studied less!... There is Jameson with his most crude theories - his orders Mammalia, Digitala & fencibles of gli[illegible]rac & bruta with [chi[sel]-shaped foreteeth && grieves me every day.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carlyle      Print: Book

  

Edward Moore : The Gamester

'I heard the greatest part of the Gamester read by Mr Garrick, before it was brought upon the stage. On the whole, I much liked it. I thought it a very affecting performance. There are faults in it; but I think it a moral and seasonable piece'

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: David Garrick      

  

David Mallett : Amyntor and Theodora, or, The Hermit

'You did not tell me before, that you had read "the Hermit" and "Alfrida". There are charming Things in both. I read them when they first came out, having a great opinion of the poetical capacity of both gentlemen. I was not disappointed. I forget the story of the Hermit, and its management: But in general I was pleased with it. Mr Mason has a fine genius... But I thought his piece was rather too poetical. - A strange censure of a fine piece of poetry. In other words, that he was too lavish, in other words. of his poetical talents...'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Richardson      Print: Book

  

William Mason : Elfrida

'You did not tell me before, that you had read the Hermit and Alfrida. There are charming Things in both. I read them when they first came out, having a great opinion of the poetical capacity of both gentlemen. I was not disappointed. I forget the story of the Hermit, and its management: But in general I was pleased with it. Mr Mason has a fine genius... But I thought his piece was rather too poetical. - A strange censure of a fine piece of poetry. In other words, that he was too lavish, in other words. of his poetical talents...'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Richardson      Print: Book

  

William Mason : Elfrida

'You did not tell me before, that you had read the Hermit and Alfrida. There are charming Things in both. I read them when they first came out, having a great opinion of the poetical capacity of both gentlemen. I was not disappointed. I forget the story of the Hermit, and its management: But in general I was pleased with it. Mr Mason has a fine genius... But I thought his piece was rather too poetical. - A strange censure of a fine piece of poetry. In other words, that he was too lavish, in other words of his poetical talents...'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Bradshaigh      Print: Book

  

David Mallett : Amyntor and Theodora, or, The Hermit

'You did not tell me before, that you had read the Hermit and Alfrida. There are charming Things in both. I read them when they first came out, having a great opinion of the poetical capacity of both gentlemen. I was not disappointed. I forget the story of the Hermit, and its management: But in general I was pleased with it. Mr Mason has a fine genius... But I thought his piece was rather too poetical. - A strange censure of a fine piece of poetry. In other words, that he was too lavish, in other words of his poetical talents...'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Bradshaigh      Print: Book

  

Marie de Rabutin-Chantal Marquise de Sevigne : Letters

'Have you read Mad. Sevigne's Letters from the [French]? Fine passages and Sentiments there are in it, & a notion given of the French manner tho' written in the middle reign of Louis XIV. What are the Two volumes called the History of Man from the French also. There is a volume which is not chaste enough to be recommended to your Ladiship. It is truly French. Its language good. But for the knowledge of the hearts of people given up to what is called Gallantry, particularly French Gallantry, I have not seen its equal. It is called Letters of Ninon de Lenclos to the marquis of Sevigne. Son of the above-named Lady, and her contemporary. It will not offend the Ear. But I would not by any means recommend it to a very young Lady'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Richardson      Print: Book

  

Christopher Smart : On the omniscence of the Supreme Being: a poetical essay

'At home all day. On reading Derham's notes on Boyle's lectures I find he says that Mr Boyle demonstrates that so slender a wire may be drawn from gold that from once ounce of gold a wire may be drawn 777,600 feet in length or 155 miles and a half. In the even Tho. Davy here and supped with us and stayed until 11 o'clock but drunk nothing, only 1 pint of mild beer. We read Smart's poems on immensity, omniscience and power.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Turner      Print: Book

  

Christopher Smart : On the power of the Supreme Being: a poetical essay

'At home all day. On reading Derham's notes on Boyle's lectures I find he says that Mr Boyle demonstrates that so slender a wire may be drawn from gold that from once ounce of gold a wire may be drawn 777,600 feet in length or 155 miles and a half. In the even Tho. Davy here and supped with us and stayed until 11 o'clock but drunk nothing, only 1 pint of mild beer. We read Smart's poems on immensity, omniscience and power.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Turner      Print: Book

  

A.E.W. Mason : Ensign Knightley

[List of books read in 1943, in diary for 1943]: 'The Farthing Spinster; Guy Mannering; Whereas I was Blind; And So to Bath; The Story of San Michele; Attack Alarm; The Murders in Praed Street; Lover's Meeting; The Secret Battle; Witch Wood; MD - Doctor of Murder; Murder at the Keyhole; That Girl Ginger; Ten Minute Alibi; Diary of a District Officer; Tarzan the Untamed; Peter Abelard; Pip; Pied Piper; A Man Lay Dead; Random Harvest; Madame Curie; Stalky and Co; Bellarion; Down the Garden Path; The Three Musketeers vol 1; The House in Cornwall; A Tall Ship; The Two Saplings; Farewell Victoria; Quinneys; House of Terror; Penguin Parade 4; Guy Mannering[presumably a re-reading]; The Man Born to be King; Casterton Papers; Old Saint Paul's; The Moon is Down; 1066 and all That; My Brother Jonathon; Gulliver's Travels; Ensign Knightley; Men Against Death; Fame is the Spur; Gone with the Wind; Mesmer; First Nights; The Hound of the Baskervilles; Little Gidding; Beau Geste; Beau Sabreur; The Amazing Theatre; The Pleasure of Your Company; Dandelion Days; Humour and Fantasy; Juno and the Paycock; The Beautiful Years; Teach Yourself to Think; Salar the Salmon; The Cathedral; The Mysterious Mr I; The Picts and the Martyrs; The Dream of Fair Women; The Star-born; Three Short Stories; A Thatched Roof; The Surgeon's Log; The Healing Knife; Nine Ghosts; While Rome Burns; The Star Spangled Manner; The Day Must Dawn; The Tower of London; Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde; The Old Man's Birthday; A little Princess; Ego 5; The Lighter Side of School Life; Kidnapped; The Trail of the Sandhill Stag; Ballet Lover's Notebook; Lorna Doone; The Plays of JM Barrie; Jane Eyre; I'll Leave it to You; Henry Fifth; Longer Poems; Antony and Cleopatra; The Man in Grey; The House in Dormer Forest; The Writing of English; Miss Mapp; The Song of Bernadette; Happy and Glorious; Sixty Poems; The Birth of Romance; The Comedy of Life; Some Little Tales; Dream Days; Royal Flush.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Margaret Mitchell : Gone with the Wind

[List of books read in 1943, in diary for 1943]: 'The Farthing Spinster; Guy Mannering; Whereas I was Blind; And So to Bath; The Story of San Michele; Attack Alarm; The Murders in Praed Street; Lover's Meeting; The Secret Battle; Witch Wood; MD - Doctor of Murder; Murder at the Keyhole; That Girl Ginger; Ten Minute Alibi; Diary of a District Officer; Tarzan the Untamed; Peter Abelard; Pip; Pied Piper; A Man Lay Dead; Random Harvest; Madame Curie; Stalky and Co; Bellarion; Down the Garden Path; The Three Musketeers vol 1; The House in Cornwall; A Tall Ship; The Two Saplings; Farewell Victoria; Quinneys; House of Terror; Penguin Parade 4; Guy Mannering[presumably a re-reading]; The Man Born to be King; Casterton Papers; Old Saint Paul's; The Moon is Down; 1066 and all That; My Brother Jonathon; Gulliver's Travels; Ensign Knightley; Men Against Death; Fame is the Spur; Gone with the Wind; Mesmer; First Nights; The Hound of the Baskervilles; Little Gidding; Beau Geste; Beau Sabreur; The Amazing Theatre; The Pleasure of Your Company; Dandelion Days; Humour and Fantasy; Juno and the Paycock; The Beautiful Years; Teach Yourself to Think; Salar the Salmon; The Cathedral; The Mysterious Mr I; The Picts and the Martyrs; The Dream of Fair Women; The Star-born; Three Short Stories; A Thatched Roof; The Surgeon's Log; The Healing Knife; Nine Ghosts; While Rome Burns; The Star Spangled Manner; The Day Must Dawn; The Tower of London; Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde; The Old Man's Birthday; A little Princess; Ego 5; The Lighter Side of School Life; Kidnapped; The Trail of the Sandhill Stag; Ballet Lover's Notebook; Lorna Doone; The Plays of JM Barrie; Jane Eyre; I'll Leave it to You; Henry Fifth; Longer Poems; Antony and Cleopatra; The Man in Grey; The House in Dormer Forest; The Writing of English; Miss Mapp; The Song of Bernadette; Happy and Glorious; Sixty Poems; The Birth of Romance; The Comedy of Life; Some Little Tales; Dream Days; Royal Flush.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Henry Williamson : Beautiful Years, The

[List of books read in 1943, in diary for 1943]: 'The Farthing Spinster; Guy Mannering; Whereas I was Blind; And So to Bath; The Story of San Michele; Attack Alarm; The Murders in Praed Street; Lover's Meeting; The Secret Battle; Witch Wood; MD - Doctor of Murder; Murder at the Keyhole; That Girl Ginger; Ten Minute Alibi; Diary of a District Officer; Tarzan the Untamed; Peter Abelard; Pip; Pied Piper; A Man Lay Dead; Random Harvest; Madame Curie; Stalky and Co; Bellarion; Down the Garden Path; The Three Musketeers vol 1; The House in Cornwall; A Tall Ship; The Two Saplings; Farewell Victoria; Quinneys; House of Terror; Penguin Parade 4; Guy Mannering[presumably a re-reading]; The Man Born to be King; Casterton Papers; Old Saint Paul's; The Moon is Down; 1066 and all That; My Brother Jonathon; Gulliver's Travels; Ensign Knightley; Men Against Death; Fame is the Spur; Gone with the Wind; Mesmer; First Nights; The Hound of the Baskervilles; Little Gidding; Beau Geste; Beau Sabreur; The Amazing Theatre; The Pleasure of Your Company; Dandelion Days; Humour and Fantasy; Juno and the Paycock; The Beautiful Years; Teach Yourself to Think; Salar the Salmon; The Cathedral; The Mysterious Mr I; The Picts and the Martyrs; The Dream of Fair Women; The Star-born; Three Short Stories; A Thatched Roof; The Surgeon's Log; The Healing Knife; Nine Ghosts; While Rome Burns; The Star Spangled Manner; The Day Must Dawn; The Tower of London; Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde; The Old Man's Birthday; A little Princess; Ego 5; The Lighter Side of School Life; Kidnapped; The Trail of the Sandhill Stag; Ballet Lover's Notebook; Lorna Doone; The Plays of JM Barrie; Jane Eyre; I'll Leave it to You; Henry Fifth; Longer Poems; Antony and Cleopatra; The Man in Grey; The House in Dormer Forest; The Writing of English; Miss Mapp; The Song of Bernadette; Happy and Glorious; Sixty Poems; The Birth of Romance; The Comedy of Life; Some Little Tales; Dream Days; Royal Flush.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Henry Williamson : Salar the Salmon

[List of books read in 1943, in diary for 1943]: 'The Farthing Spinster; Guy Mannering; Whereas I was Blind; And So to Bath; The Story of San Michele; Attack Alarm; The Murders in Praed Street; Lover's Meeting; The Secret Battle; Witch Wood; MD - Doctor of Murder; Murder at the Keyhole; That Girl Ginger; Ten Minute Alibi; Diary of a District Officer; Tarzan the Untamed; Peter Abelard; Pip; Pied Piper; A Man Lay Dead; Random Harvest; Madame Curie; Stalky and Co; Bellarion; Down the Garden Path; The Three Musketeers vol 1; The House in Cornwall; A Tall Ship; The Two Saplings; Farewell Victoria; Quinneys; House of Terror; Penguin Parade 4; Guy Mannering[presumably a re-reading]; The Man Born to be King; Casterton Papers; Old Saint Paul's; The Moon is Down; 1066 and all That; My Brother Jonathon; Gulliver's Travels; Ensign Knightley; Men Against Death; Fame is the Spur; Gone with the Wind; Mesmer; First Nights; The Hound of the Baskervilles; Little Gidding; Beau Geste; Beau Sabreur; The Amazing Theatre; The Pleasure of Your Company; Dandelion Days; Humour and Fantasy; Juno and the Paycock; The Beautiful Years; Teach Yourself to Think; Salar the Salmon; The Cathedral; The Mysterious Mr I; The Picts and the Martyrs; The Dream of Fair Women; The Star-born; Three Short Stories; A Thatched Roof; The Surgeon's Log; The Healing Knife; Nine Ghosts; While Rome Burns; The Star Spangled Manner; The Day Must Dawn; The Tower of London; Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde; The Old Man's Birthday; A little Princess; Ego 5; The Lighter Side of School Life; Kidnapped; The Trail of the Sandhill Stag; Ballet Lover's Notebook; Lorna Doone; The Plays of JM Barrie; Jane Eyre; I'll Leave it to You; Henry Fifth; Longer Poems; Antony and Cleopatra; The Man in Grey; The House in Dormer Forest; The Writing of English; Miss Mapp; The Song of Bernadette; Happy and Glorious; Sixty Poems; The Birth of Romance; The Comedy of Life; Some Little Tales; Dream Days; Royal Flush.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Henry Williamson : Dream of Fair Women, The

[List of books read in 1943, in diary for 1943]: 'The Farthing Spinster; Guy Mannering; Whereas I was Blind; And So to Bath; The Story of San Michele; Attack Alarm; The Murders in Praed Street; Lover's Meeting; The Secret Battle; Witch Wood; MD - Doctor of Murder; Murder at the Keyhole; That Girl Ginger; Ten Minute Alibi; Diary of a District Officer; Tarzan the Untamed; Peter Abelard; Pip; Pied Piper; A Man Lay Dead; Random Harvest; Madame Curie; Stalky and Co; Bellarion; Down the Garden Path; The Three Musketeers vol 1; The House in Cornwall; A Tall Ship; The Two Saplings; Farewell Victoria; Quinneys; House of Terror; Penguin Parade 4; Guy Mannering[presumably a re-reading]; The Man Born to be King; Casterton Papers; Old Saint Paul's; The Moon is Down; 1066 and all That; My Brother Jonathon; Gulliver's Travels; Ensign Knightley; Men Against Death; Fame is the Spur; Gone with the Wind; Mesmer; First Nights; The Hound of the Baskervilles; Little Gidding; Beau Geste; Beau Sabreur; The Amazing Theatre; The Pleasure of Your Company; Dandelion Days; Humour and Fantasy; Juno and the Paycock; The Beautiful Years; Teach Yourself to Think; Salar the Salmon; The Cathedral; The Mysterious Mr I; The Picts and the Martyrs; The Dream of Fair Women; The Star-born; Three Short Stories; A Thatched Roof; The Surgeon's Log; The Healing Knife; Nine Ghosts; While Rome Burns; The Star Spangled Manner; The Day Must Dawn; The Tower of London; Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde; The Old Man's Birthday; A little Princess; Ego 5; The Lighter Side of School Life; Kidnapped; The Trail of the Sandhill Stag; Ballet Lover's Notebook; Lorna Doone; The Plays of JM Barrie; Jane Eyre; I'll Leave it to You; Henry Fifth; Longer Poems; Antony and Cleopatra; The Man in Grey; The House in Dormer Forest; The Writing of English; Miss Mapp; The Song of Bernadette; Happy and Glorious; Sixty Poems; The Birth of Romance; The Comedy of Life; Some Little Tales; Dream Days; Royal Flush.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Henry Williamson : Star-born, The

[List of books read in 1943, in diary for 1943]: 'The Farthing Spinster; Guy Mannering; Whereas I was Blind; And So to Bath; The Story of San Michele; Attack Alarm; The Murders in Praed Street; Lover's Meeting; The Secret Battle; Witch Wood; MD - Doctor of Murder; Murder at the Keyhole; That Girl Ginger; Ten Minute Alibi; Diary of a District Officer; Tarzan the Untamed; Peter Abelard; Pip; Pied Piper; A Man Lay Dead; Random Harvest; Madame Curie; Stalky and Co; Bellarion; Down the Garden Path; The Three Musketeers vol 1; The House in Cornwall; A Tall Ship; The Two Saplings; Farewell Victoria; Quinneys; House of Terror; Penguin Parade 4; Guy Mannering[presumably a re-reading]; The Man Born to be King; Casterton Papers; Old Saint Paul's; The Moon is Down; 1066 and all That; My Brother Jonathon; Gulliver's Travels; Ensign Knightley; Men Against Death; Fame is the Spur; Gone with the Wind; Mesmer; First Nights; The Hound of the Baskervilles; Little Gidding; Beau Geste; Beau Sabreur; The Amazing Theatre; The Pleasure of Your Company; Dandelion Days; Humour and Fantasy; Juno and the Paycock; The Beautiful Years; Teach Yourself to Think; Salar the Salmon; The Cathedral; The Mysterious Mr I; The Picts and the Martyrs; The Dream of Fair Women; The Star-born; Three Short Stories; A Thatched Roof; The Surgeon's Log; The Healing Knife; Nine Ghosts; While Rome Burns; The Star Spangled Manner; The Day Must Dawn; The Tower of London; Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde; The Old Man's Birthday; A little Princess; Ego 5; The Lighter Side of School Life; Kidnapped; The Trail of the Sandhill Stag; Ballet Lover's Notebook; Lorna Doone; The Plays of JM Barrie; Jane Eyre; I'll Leave it to You; Henry Fifth; Longer Poems; Antony and Cleopatra; The Man in Grey; The House in Dormer Forest; The Writing of English; Miss Mapp; The Song of Bernadette; Happy and Glorious; Sixty Poems; The Birth of Romance; The Comedy of Life; Some Little Tales; Dream Days; Royal Flush.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Arthur Ransome : Picts and the Martyrs, The

[List of books read in 1943, in diary for 1943]: 'The Farthing Spinster; Guy Mannering; Whereas I was Blind; And So to Bath; The Story of San Michele; Attack Alarm; The Murders in Praed Street; Lover's Meeting; The Secret Battle; Witch Wood; MD - Doctor of Murder; Murder at the Keyhole; That Girl Ginger; Ten Minute Alibi; Diary of a District Officer; Tarzan the Untamed; Peter Abelard; Pip; Pied Piper; A Man Lay Dead; Random Harvest; Madame Curie; Stalky and Co; Bellarion; Down the Garden Path; The Three Musketeers vol 1; The House in Cornwall; A Tall Ship; The Two Saplings; Farewell Victoria; Quinneys; House of Terror; Penguin Parade 4; Guy Mannering[presumably a re-reading]; The Man Born to be King; Casterton Papers; Old Saint Paul's; The Moon is Down; 1066 and all That; My Brother Jonathon; Gulliver's Travels; Ensign Knightley; Men Against Death; Fame is the Spur; Gone with the Wind; Mesmer; First Nights; The Hound of the Baskervilles; Little Gidding; Beau Geste; Beau Sabreur; The Amazing Theatre; The Pleasure of Your Company; Dandelion Days; Humour and Fantasy; Juno and the Paycock; The Beautiful Years; Teach Yourself to Think; Salar the Salmon; The Cathedral; The Mysterious Mr I; The Picts and the Martyrs; The Dream of Fair Women; The Star-born; Three Short Stories; A Thatched Roof; The Surgeon's Log; The Healing Knife; Nine Ghosts; While Rome Burns; The Star Spangled Manner; The Day Must Dawn; The Tower of London; Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde; The Old Man's Birthday; A little Princess; Ego 5; The Lighter Side of School Life; Kidnapped; The Trail of the Sandhill Stag; Ballet Lover's Notebook; Lorna Doone; The Plays of JM Barrie; Jane Eyre; I'll Leave it to You; Henry Fifth; Longer Poems; Antony and Cleopatra; The Man in Grey; The House in Dormer Forest; The Writing of English; Miss Mapp; The Song of Bernadette; Happy and Glorious; Sixty Poems; The Birth of Romance; The Comedy of Life; Some Little Tales; Dream Days; Royal Flush.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Kay Ambrose : Ballet Lover's Notebook

[List of books read in 1943, in diary for 1943]: 'The Farthing Spinster; Guy Mannering; Whereas I was Blind; And So to Bath; The Story of San Michele; Attack Alarm; The Murders in Praed Street; Lover's Meeting; The Secret Battle; Witch Wood; MD - Doctor of Murder; Murder at the Keyhole; That Girl Ginger; Ten Minute Alibi; Diary of a District Officer; Tarzan the Untamed; Peter Abelard; Pip; Pied Piper; A Man Lay Dead; Random Harvest; Madame Curie; Stalky and Co; Bellarion; Down the Garden Path; The Three Musketeers vol 1; The House in Cornwall; A Tall Ship; The Two Saplings; Farewell Victoria; Quinneys; House of Terror; Penguin Parade 4; Guy Mannering[presumably a re-reading]; The Man Born to be King; Casterton Papers; Old Saint Paul's; The Moon is Down; 1066 and all That; My Brother Jonathon; Gulliver's Travels; Ensign Knightley; Men Against Death; Fame is the Spur; Gone with the Wind; Mesmer; First Nights; The Hound of the Baskervilles; Little Gidding; Beau Geste; Beau Sabreur; The Amazing Theatre; The Pleasure of Your Company; Dandelion Days; Humour and Fantasy; Juno and the Paycock; The Beautiful Years; Teach Yourself to Think; Salar the Salmon; The Cathedral; The Mysterious Mr I; The Picts and the Martyrs; The Dream of Fair Women; The Star-born; Three Short Stories; A Thatched Roof; The Surgeon's Log; The Healing Knife; Nine Ghosts; While Rome Burns; The Star Spangled Manner; The Day Must Dawn; The Tower of London; Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde; The Old Man's Birthday; A little Princess; Ego 5; The Lighter Side of School Life; Kidnapped; The Trail of the Sandhill Stag; Ballet Lover's Notebook; Lorna Doone; The Plays of JM Barrie; Jane Eyre; I'll Leave it to You; Henry Fifth; Longer Poems; Antony and Cleopatra; The Man in Grey; The House in Dormer Forest; The Writing of English; Miss Mapp; The Song of Bernadette; Happy and Glorious; Sixty Poems; The Birth of Romance; The Comedy of Life; Some Little Tales; Dream Days; Royal Flush.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

S.P.B. Mais : Writing of English, The

[List of books read in 1943, in diary for 1943]: 'The Farthing Spinster; Guy Mannering; Whereas I was Blind; And So to Bath; The Story of San Michele; Attack Alarm; The Murders in Praed Street; Lover's Meeting; The Secret Battle; Witch Wood; MD - Doctor of Murder; Murder at the Keyhole; That Girl Ginger; Ten Minute Alibi; Diary of a District Officer; Tarzan the Untamed; Peter Abelard; Pip; Pied Piper; A Man Lay Dead; Random Harvest; Madame Curie; Stalky and Co; Bellarion; Down the Garden Path; The Three Musketeers vol 1; The House in Cornwall; A Tall Ship; The Two Saplings; Farewell Victoria; Quinneys; House of Terror; Penguin Parade 4; Guy Mannering[presumably a re-reading]; The Man Born to be King; Casterton Papers; Old Saint Paul's; The Moon is Down; 1066 and all That; My Brother Jonathon; Gulliver's Travels; Ensign Knightley; Men Against Death; Fame is the Spur; Gone with the Wind; Mesmer; First Nights; The Hound of the Baskervilles; Little Gidding; Beau Geste; Beau Sabreur; The Amazing Theatre; The Pleasure of Your Company; Dandelion Days; Humour and Fantasy; Juno and the Paycock; The Beautiful Years; Teach Yourself to Think; Salar the Salmon; The Cathedral; The Mysterious Mr I; The Picts and the Martyrs; The Dream of Fair Women; The Star-born; Three Short Stories; A Thatched Roof; The Surgeon's Log; The Healing Knife; Nine Ghosts; While Rome Burns; The Star Spangled Manner; The Day Must Dawn; The Tower of London; Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde; The Old Man's Birthday; A little Princess; Ego 5; The Lighter Side of School Life; Kidnapped; The Trail of the Sandhill Stag; Ballet Lover's Notebook; Lorna Doone; The Plays of JM Barrie; Jane Eyre; I'll Leave it to You; Henry Fifth; Longer Poems; Antony and Cleopatra; The Man in Grey; The House in Dormer Forest; The Writing of English; Miss Mapp; The Song of Bernadette; Happy and Glorious; Sixty Poems; The Birth of Romance; The Comedy of Life; Some Little Tales; Dream Days; Royal Flush.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Laurence Housman : Happy and Glorious

[List of books read in 1943, in diary for 1943]: 'The Farthing Spinster; Guy Mannering; Whereas I was Blind; And So to Bath; The Story of San Michele; Attack Alarm; The Murders in Praed Street; Lover's Meeting; The Secret Battle; Witch Wood; MD - Doctor of Murder; Murder at the Keyhole; That Girl Ginger; Ten Minute Alibi; Diary of a District Officer; Tarzan the Untamed; Peter Abelard; Pip; Pied Piper; A Man Lay Dead; Random Harvest; Madame Curie; Stalky and Co; Bellarion; Down the Garden Path; The Three Musketeers vol 1; The House in Cornwall; A Tall Ship; The Two Saplings; Farewell Victoria; Quinneys; House of Terror; Penguin Parade 4; Guy Mannering[presumably a re-reading]; The Man Born to be King; Casterton Papers; Old Saint Paul's; The Moon is Down; 1066 and all That; My Brother Jonathon; Gulliver's Travels; Ensign Knightley; Men Against Death; Fame is the Spur; Gone with the Wind; Mesmer; First Nights; The Hound of the Baskervilles; Little Gidding; Beau Geste; Beau Sabreur; The Amazing Theatre; The Pleasure of Your Company; Dandelion Days; Humour and Fantasy; Juno and the Paycock; The Beautiful Years; Teach Yourself to Think; Salar the Salmon; The Cathedral; The Mysterious Mr I; The Picts and the Martyrs; The Dream of Fair Women; The Star-born; Three Short Stories; A Thatched Roof; The Surgeon's Log; The Healing Knife; Nine Ghosts; While Rome Burns; The Star Spangled Manner; The Day Must Dawn; The Tower of London; Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde; The Old Man's Birthday; A little Princess; Ego 5; The Lighter Side of School Life; Kidnapped; The Trail of the Sandhill Stag; Ballet Lover's Notebook; Lorna Doone; The Plays of JM Barrie; Jane Eyre; I'll Leave it to You; Henry Fifth; Longer Poems; Antony and Cleopatra; The Man in Grey; The House in Dormer Forest; The Writing of English; Miss Mapp; The Song of Bernadette; Happy and Glorious; Sixty Poems; The Birth of Romance; The Comedy of Life; Some Little Tales; Dream Days; Royal Flush.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

R Brimley Johnson : Birth of Romance, The

[List of books read in 1943, in diary for 1943]: 'The Farthing Spinster; Guy Mannering; Whereas I was Blind; And So to Bath; The Story of San Michele; Attack Alarm; The Murders in Praed Street; Lover's Meeting; The Secret Battle; Witch Wood; MD - Doctor of Murder; Murder at the Keyhole; That Girl Ginger; Ten Minute Alibi; Diary of a District Officer; Tarzan the Untamed; Peter Abelard; Pip; Pied Piper; A Man Lay Dead; Random Harvest; Madame Curie; Stalky and Co; Bellarion; Down the Garden Path; The Three Musketeers vol 1; The House in Cornwall; A Tall Ship; The Two Saplings; Farewell Victoria; Quinneys; House of Terror; Penguin Parade 4; Guy Mannering[presumably a re-reading]; The Man Born to be King; Casterton Papers; Old Saint Paul's; The Moon is Down; 1066 and all That; My Brother Jonathon; Gulliver's Travels; Ensign Knightley; Men Against Death; Fame is the Spur; Gone with the Wind; Mesmer; First Nights; The Hound of the Baskervilles; Little Gidding; Beau Geste; Beau Sabreur; The Amazing Theatre; The Pleasure of Your Company; Dandelion Days; Humour and Fantasy; Juno and the Paycock; The Beautiful Years; Teach Yourself to Think; Salar the Salmon; The Cathedral; The Mysterious Mr I; The Picts and the Martyrs; The Dream of Fair Women; The Star-born; Three Short Stories; A Thatched Roof; The Surgeon's Log; The Healing Knife; Nine Ghosts; While Rome Burns; The Star Spangled Manner; The Day Must Dawn; The Tower of London; Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde; The Old Man's Birthday; A little Princess; Ego 5; The Lighter Side of School Life; Kidnapped; The Trail of the Sandhill Stag; Ballet Lover's Notebook; Lorna Doone; The Plays of JM Barrie; Jane Eyre; I'll Leave it to You; Henry Fifth; Longer Poems; Antony and Cleopatra; The Man in Grey; The House in Dormer Forest; The Writing of English; Miss Mapp; The Song of Bernadette; Happy and Glorious; Sixty Poems; The Birth of Romance; The Comedy of Life; Some Little Tales; Dream Days; Royal Flush.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

R Brimley Johnson : Comedy of Life, The

[List of books read in 1943, in diary for 1943]: 'The Farthing Spinster; Guy Mannering; Whereas I was Blind; And So to Bath; The Story of San Michele; Attack Alarm; The Murders in Praed Street; Lover's Meeting; The Secret Battle; Witch Wood; MD - Doctor of Murder; Murder at the Keyhole; That Girl Ginger; Ten Minute Alibi; Diary of a District Officer; Tarzan the Untamed; Peter Abelard; Pip; Pied Piper; A Man Lay Dead; Random Harvest; Madame Curie; Stalky and Co; Bellarion; Down the Garden Path; The Three Musketeers vol 1; The House in Cornwall; A Tall Ship; The Two Saplings; Farewell Victoria; Quinneys; House of Terror; Penguin Parade 4; Guy Mannering[presumably a re-reading]; The Man Born to be King; Casterton Papers; Old Saint Paul's; The Moon is Down; 1066 and all That; My Brother Jonathon; Gulliver's Travels; Ensign Knightley; Men Against Death; Fame is the Spur; Gone with the Wind; Mesmer; First Nights; The Hound of the Baskervilles; Little Gidding; Beau Geste; Beau Sabreur; The Amazing Theatre; The Pleasure of Your Company; Dandelion Days; Humour and Fantasy; Juno and the Paycock; The Beautiful Years; Teach Yourself to Think; Salar the Salmon; The Cathedral; The Mysterious Mr I; The Picts and the Martyrs; The Dream of Fair Women; The Star-born; Three Short Stories; A Thatched Roof; The Surgeon's Log; The Healing Knife; Nine Ghosts; While Rome Burns; The Star Spangled Manner; The Day Must Dawn; The Tower of London; Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde; The Old Man's Birthday; A little Princess; Ego 5; The Lighter Side of School Life; Kidnapped; The Trail of the Sandhill Stag; Ballet Lover's Notebook; Lorna Doone; The Plays of JM Barrie; Jane Eyre; I'll Leave it to You; Henry Fifth; Longer Poems; Antony and Cleopatra; The Man in Grey; The House in Dormer Forest; The Writing of English; Miss Mapp; The Song of Bernadette; Happy and Glorious; Sixty Poems; The Birth of Romance; The Comedy of Life; Some Little Tales; Dream Days; Royal Flush.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

R Brimley Johnson : Some Little Tales

[List of books read in 1943, in diary for 1943]: 'The Farthing Spinster; Guy Mannering; Whereas I was Blind; And So to Bath; The Story of San Michele; Attack Alarm; The Murders in Praed Street; Lover's Meeting; The Secret Battle; Witch Wood; MD - Doctor of Murder; Murder at the Keyhole; That Girl Ginger; Ten Minute Alibi; Diary of a District Officer; Tarzan the Untamed; Peter Abelard; Pip; Pied Piper; A Man Lay Dead; Random Harvest; Madame Curie; Stalky and Co; Bellarion; Down the Garden Path; The Three Musketeers vol 1; The House in Cornwall; A Tall Ship; The Two Saplings; Farewell Victoria; Quinneys; House of Terror; Penguin Parade 4; Guy Mannering[presumably a re-reading]; The Man Born to be King; Casterton Papers; Old Saint Paul's; The Moon is Down; 1066 and all That; My Brother Jonathon; Gulliver's Travels; Ensign Knightley; Men Against Death; Fame is the Spur; Gone with the Wind; Mesmer; First Nights; The Hound of the Baskervilles; Little Gidding; Beau Geste; Beau Sabreur; The Amazing Theatre; The Pleasure of Your Company; Dandelion Days; Humour and Fantasy; Juno and the Paycock; The Beautiful Years; Teach Yourself to Think; Salar the Salmon; The Cathedral; The Mysterious Mr I; The Picts and the Martyrs; The Dream of Fair Women; The Star-born; Three Short Stories; A Thatched Roof; The Surgeon's Log; The Healing Knife; Nine Ghosts; While Rome Burns; The Star Spangled Manner; The Day Must Dawn; The Tower of London; Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde; The Old Man's Birthday; A little Princess; Ego 5; The Lighter Side of School Life; Kidnapped; The Trail of the Sandhill Stag; Ballet Lover's Notebook; Lorna Doone; The Plays of JM Barrie; Jane Eyre; I'll Leave it to You; Henry Fifth; Longer Poems; Antony and Cleopatra; The Man in Grey; The House in Dormer Forest; The Writing of English; Miss Mapp; The Song of Bernadette; Happy and Glorious; Sixty Poems; The Birth of Romance; The Comedy of Life; Some Little Tales; Dream Days; Royal Flush.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Kenneth Grahame : Dream Days

[List of books read in 1943, in diary for 1943]: 'The Farthing Spinster; Guy Mannering; Whereas I was Blind; And So to Bath; The Story of San Michele; Attack Alarm; The Murders in Praed Street; Lover's Meeting; The Secret Battle; Witch Wood; MD - Doctor of Murder; Murder at the Keyhole; That Girl Ginger; Ten Minute Alibi; Diary of a District Officer; Tarzan the Untamed; Peter Abelard; Pip; Pied Piper; A Man Lay Dead; Random Harvest; Madame Curie; Stalky and Co; Bellarion; Down the Garden Path; The Three Musketeers vol 1; The House in Cornwall; A Tall Ship; The Two Saplings; Farewell Victoria; Quinneys; House of Terror; Penguin Parade 4; Guy Mannering[presumably a re-reading]; The Man Born to be King; Casterton Papers; Old Saint Paul's; The Moon is Down; 1066 and all That; My Brother Jonathon; Gulliver's Travels; Ensign Knightley; Men Against Death; Fame is the Spur; Gone with the Wind; Mesmer; First Nights; The Hound of the Baskervilles; Little Gidding; Beau Geste; Beau Sabreur; The Amazing Theatre; The Pleasure of Your Company; Dandelion Days; Humour and Fantasy; Juno and the Paycock; The Beautiful Years; Teach Yourself to Think; Salar the Salmon; The Cathedral; The Mysterious Mr I; The Picts and the Martyrs; The Dream of Fair Women; The Star-born; Three Short Stories; A Thatched Roof; The Surgeon's Log; The Healing Knife; Nine Ghosts; While Rome Burns; The Star Spangled Manner; The Day Must Dawn; The Tower of London; Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde; The Old Man's Birthday; A little Princess; Ego 5; The Lighter Side of School Life; Kidnapped; The Trail of the Sandhill Stag; Ballet Lover's Notebook; Lorna Doone; The Plays of JM Barrie; Jane Eyre; I'll Leave it to You; Henry Fifth; Longer Poems; Antony and Cleopatra; The Man in Grey; The House in Dormer Forest; The Writing of English; Miss Mapp; The Song of Bernadette; Happy and Glorious; Sixty Poems; The Birth of Romance; The Comedy of Life; Some Little Tales; Dream Days; Royal Flush.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Alexandre Dumas : Count of Monte Cristo, The

'Read "The Count of Monte Cristo" (abridged) which is simply superb. Bought "Song of Bernadette" at last.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Charles Lamb : Some Essays of Elia

'Spent the day reading Lamb [for Higher School Certificate Eng. Lit]. Have decided that if I read an author each fortnight I might manage to finish (by February) "The Age of Wordsworth"'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Charles Lamb : The Best of Lamb

'Spent the day reading Lamb [for Higher School Certificate Eng. Lit]. Have decided that if I read an author each fortnight I might manage to finish (by February) "The Age of Wordsworth"'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Axel Munthe : Story of San Michele, The

'1944 My Favourite: Books: "Peter Abelard". "The Story of San Michele" Authors: Henry Williamson, B. Nichols Poems: Hiawatha. Arabia Writers: Shaw. Dorothy Sayers'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Henry Williamson : unknown

'1944 My Favourite: Books: "Peter Abelard". "The Story of San Michele" Authors: Henry Williamson, B. Nichols Poems: Hiawatha. Arabia Writers: Shaw. Dorothy Sayers'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Walter de la Mare : Arabia

'1944 My Favourite: Books: "Peter Abelard". "The Story of San Michele" Authors: Henry Williamson, B. Nichols Poems: Hiawatha. Arabia Writers: Shaw. Dorothy Sayers'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Eleanor Smith : Life's a Circus

[List of books read during 1944]: 'The Specialist; All This and Heaven Too; Antony; Uncle Tom's Cabin; Roper's Row; Tom Brown's Schooldays; Life's a Circus; The Keys of the Kingdom; Two Survived; Hamlet; King's Nurse, Beggar's Nurse; The Snow Goose; Gerald; Early Stages; Cross Creek; Footnotes to the Ballet; The Great Ship; Hungry Hill; Hiawatha; Captain Blood; Scaramouche; Heartbreak House; Fortune's Fool; Fifth Form at St Dominic's; Cold Comfort Farm; The Lost King; The count of Monte Cristo; Diary of a Provincial Lady; Frenchman's Creek; Song of Bernadette; Romeo and Juliet; Rebecca; The Surgeon's Destiny; The Killer and the Slain; Anna; King Solomon's Mines; The Black Moth; Have His Carcase; Peacock Pie; Alice in Wonderland; The Citadel; Good Companions; Our Hearts were Young and Gay; Memoirs of a Fox-hunting Man; The Healing Knife; First Year Out; Saint Joan; Stars Look Down; Bridge of San Luis Rey; Rogue Herries; Caesar and Cleopatra; Xmas at Cold Comfort Farm; Dark Lady of the Sonnets; The Velvet Deer; Leaves from a Surgeon's Case Book; A Christmas Carol; Craft of Comedy; As You Like It; Lottie Dundass; Plays of John Galsworthy; Provincial Lady in America; She Shanties; Peter Abelard; Actor, Soldier, Poet; The Best of Lamb; Some Essay of Elia; Poems, Plays etc; The White Cliffs; Three Men in a Boat; Confessions of an Opium Eater; In Search of England; Wuthering Heights; Pericles, Prince of Tyre; Poems of Contemporary Women; Crime at the Club; Quality Street; Villette; Major Barbara; Pygmalion; You Never Can Tell; King John; Doctor's Dilemma'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Daphne Du Maurier : Gerald

[List of books read during 1944]: 'The Specialist; All This and Heaven Too; Antony; Uncle Tom's Cabin; Roper's Row; Tom Brown's Schooldays; Life's a Circus; The Keys of the Kingdom; Two Survived; Hamlet; King's Nurse, Beggar's Nurse; The Snow Goose; Gerald; Early Stages; Cross Creek; Footnotes to the Ballet; The Great Ship; Hungry Hill; Hiawatha; Captain Blood; Scaramouche; Heartbreak House; Fortune's Fool; Fifth Form at St Dominic's; Cold Comfort Farm; The Lost King; The count of Monte Cristo; Diary of a Provincial Lady; Frenchman's Creek; Song of Bernadette; Romeo and Juliet; Rebecca; The Surgeon's Destiny; The Killer and the Slain; Anna; King Solomon's Mines; The Black Moth; Have His Carcase; Peacock Pie; Alice in Wonderland; The Citadel; Good Companions; Our Hearts were Young and Gay; Memoirs of a Fox-hunting Man; The Healing Knife; First Year Out; Saint Joan; Stars Look Down; Bridge of San Luis Rey; Rogue Herries; Caesar and Cleopatra; Xmas at Cold Comfort Farm; Dark Lady of the Sonnets; The Velvet Deer; Leaves from a Surgeon's Case Book; A Christmas Carol; Craft of Comedy; As You Like It; Lottie Dundass; Plays of John Galsworthy; Provincial Lady in America; She Shanties; Peter Abelard; Actor, Soldier, Poet; The Best of Lamb; Some Essay of Elia; Poems, Plays etc; The White Cliffs; Three Men in a Boat; Confessions of an Opium Eater; In Search of England; Wuthering Heights; Pericles, Prince of Tyre; Poems of Contemporary Women; Crime at the Club; Quality Street; Villette; Major Barbara; Pygmalion; You Never Can Tell; King John; Doctor's Dilemma'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Caryl Brahms : Footnotes to the Ballet

[List of books read during 1944]: 'The Specialist; All This and Heaven Too; Antony; Uncle Tom's Cabin; Roper's Row; Tom Brown's Schooldays; Life's a Circus; The Keys of the Kingdom; Two Survived; Hamlet; King's Nurse, Beggar's Nurse; The Snow Goose; Gerald; Early Stages; Cross Creek; Footnotes to the Ballet; The Great Ship; Hungry Hill; Hiawatha; Captain Blood; Scaramouche; Heartbreak House; Fortune's Fool; Fifth Form at St Dominic's; Cold Comfort Farm; The Lost King; The count of Monte Cristo; Diary of a Provincial Lady; Frenchman's Creek; Song of Bernadette; Romeo and Juliet; Rebecca; The Surgeon's Destiny; The Killer and the Slain; Anna; King Solomon's Mines; The Black Moth; Have His Carcase; Peacock Pie; Alice in Wonderland; The Citadel; Good Companions; Our Hearts were Young and Gay; Memoirs of a Fox-hunting Man; The Healing Knife; First Year Out; Saint Joan; Stars Look Down; Bridge of San Luis Rey; Rogue Herries; Caesar and Cleopatra; Xmas at Cold Comfort Farm; Dark Lady of the Sonnets; The Velvet Deer; Leaves from a Surgeon's Case Book; A Christmas Carol; Craft of Comedy; As You Like It; Lottie Dundass; Plays of John Galsworthy; Provincial Lady in America; She Shanties; Peter Abelard; Actor, Soldier, Poet; The Best of Lamb; Some Essay of Elia; Poems, Plays etc; The White Cliffs; Three Men in a Boat; Confessions of an Opium Eater; In Search of England; Wuthering Heights; Pericles, Prince of Tyre; Poems of Contemporary Women; Crime at the Club; Quality Street; Villette; Major Barbara; Pygmalion; You Never Can Tell; King John; Doctor's Dilemma'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Daphne Du Maurier : Hungry Hill

[List of books read during 1944]: 'The Specialist; All This and Heaven Too; Antony; Uncle Tom's Cabin; Roper's Row; Tom Brown's Schooldays; Life's a Circus; The Keys of the Kingdom; Two Survived; Hamlet; King's Nurse, Beggar's Nurse; The Snow Goose; Gerald; Early Stages; Cross Creek; Footnotes to the Ballet; The Great Ship; Hungry Hill; Hiawatha; Captain Blood; Scaramouche; Heartbreak House; Fortune's Fool; Fifth Form at St Dominic's; Cold Comfort Farm; The Lost King; The count of Monte Cristo; Diary of a Provincial Lady; Frenchman's Creek; Song of Bernadette; Romeo and Juliet; Rebecca; The Surgeon's Destiny; The Killer and the Slain; Anna; King Solomon's Mines; The Black Moth; Have His Carcase; Peacock Pie; Alice in Wonderland; The Citadel; Good Companions; Our Hearts were Young and Gay; Memoirs of a Fox-hunting Man; The Healing Knife; First Year Out; Saint Joan; Stars Look Down; Bridge of San Luis Rey; Rogue Herries; Caesar and Cleopatra; Xmas at Cold Comfort Farm; Dark Lady of the Sonnets; The Velvet Deer; Leaves from a Surgeon's Case Book; A Christmas Carol; Craft of Comedy; As You Like It; Lottie Dundass; Plays of John Galsworthy; Provincial Lady in America; She Shanties; Peter Abelard; Actor, Soldier, Poet; The Best of Lamb; Some Essay of Elia; Poems, Plays etc; The White Cliffs; Three Men in a Boat; Confessions of an Opium Eater; In Search of England; Wuthering Heights; Pericles, Prince of Tyre; Poems of Contemporary Women; Crime at the Club; Quality Street; Villette; Major Barbara; Pygmalion; You Never Can Tell; King John; Doctor's Dilemma'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Daphne Du Maurier : Frenchman's Creek

[List of books read during 1944]: 'The Specialist; All This and Heaven Too; Antony; Uncle Tom's Cabin; Roper's Row; Tom Brown's Schooldays; Life's a Circus; The Keys of the Kingdom; Two Survived; Hamlet; King's Nurse, Beggar's Nurse; The Snow Goose; Gerald; Early Stages; Cross Creek; Footnotes to the Ballet; The Great Ship; Hungry Hill; Hiawatha; Captain Blood; Scaramouche; Heartbreak House; Fortune's Fool; Fifth Form at St Dominic's; Cold Comfort Farm; The Lost King; The count of Monte Cristo; Diary of a Provincial Lady; Frenchman's Creek; Song of Bernadette; Romeo and Juliet; Rebecca; The Surgeon's Destiny; The Killer and the Slain; Anna; King Solomon's Mines; The Black Moth; Have His Carcase; Peacock Pie; Alice in Wonderland; The Citadel; Good Companions; Our Hearts were Young and Gay; Memoirs of a Fox-hunting Man; The Healing Knife; First Year Out; Saint Joan; Stars Look Down; Bridge of San Luis Rey; Rogue Herries; Caesar and Cleopatra; Xmas at Cold Comfort Farm; Dark Lady of the Sonnets; The Velvet Deer; Leaves from a Surgeon's Case Book; A Christmas Carol; Craft of Comedy; As You Like It; Lottie Dundass; Plays of John Galsworthy; Provincial Lady in America; She Shanties; Peter Abelard; Actor, Soldier, Poet; The Best of Lamb; Some Essay of Elia; Poems, Plays etc; The White Cliffs; Three Men in a Boat; Confessions of an Opium Eater; In Search of England; Wuthering Heights; Pericles, Prince of Tyre; Poems of Contemporary Women; Crime at the Club; Quality Street; Villette; Major Barbara; Pygmalion; You Never Can Tell; King John; Doctor's Dilemma'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Daphne Du Maurier : Rebecca

[List of books read during 1944]: 'The Specialist; All This and Heaven Too; Antony; Uncle Tom's Cabin; Roper's Row; Tom Brown's Schooldays; Life's a Circus; The Keys of the Kingdom; Two Survived; Hamlet; King's Nurse, Beggar's Nurse; The Snow Goose; Gerald; Early Stages; Cross Creek; Footnotes to the Ballet; The Great Ship; Hungry Hill; Hiawatha; Captain Blood; Scaramouche; Heartbreak House; Fortune's Fool; Fifth Form at St Dominic's; Cold Comfort Farm; The Lost King; The count of Monte Cristo; Diary of a Provincial Lady; Frenchman's Creek; Song of Bernadette; Romeo and Juliet; Rebecca; The Surgeon's Destiny; The Killer and the Slain; Anna; King Solomon's Mines; The Black Moth; Have His Carcase; Peacock Pie; Alice in Wonderland; The Citadel; Good Companions; Our Hearts were Young and Gay; Memoirs of a Fox-hunting Man; The Healing Knife; First Year Out; Saint Joan; Stars Look Down; Bridge of San Luis Rey; Rogue Herries; Caesar and Cleopatra; Xmas at Cold Comfort Farm; Dark Lady of the Sonnets; The Velvet Deer; Leaves from a Surgeon's Case Book; A Christmas Carol; Craft of Comedy; As You Like It; Lottie Dundass; Plays of John Galsworthy; Provincial Lady in America; She Shanties; Peter Abelard; Actor, Soldier, Poet; The Best of Lamb; Some Essay of Elia; Poems, Plays etc; The White Cliffs; Three Men in a Boat; Confessions of an Opium Eater; In Search of England; Wuthering Heights; Pericles, Prince of Tyre; Poems of Contemporary Women; Crime at the Club; Quality Street; Villette; Major Barbara; Pygmalion; You Never Can Tell; King John; Doctor's Dilemma'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Walter de la Mare : Peacock Pie

[List of books read during 1944]: 'The Specialist; All This and Heaven Too; Antony; Uncle Tom's Cabin; Roper's Row; Tom Brown's Schooldays; Life's a Circus; The Keys of the Kingdom; Two Survived; Hamlet; King's Nurse, Beggar's Nurse; The Snow Goose; Gerald; Early Stages; Cross Creek; Footnotes to the Ballet; The Great Ship; Hungry Hill; Hiawatha; Captain Blood; Scaramouche; Heartbreak House; Fortune's Fool; Fifth Form at St Dominic's; Cold Comfort Farm; The Lost King; The count of Monte Cristo; Diary of a Provincial Lady; Frenchman's Creek; Song of Bernadette; Romeo and Juliet; Rebecca; The Surgeon's Destiny; The Killer and the Slain; Anna; King Solomon's Mines; The Black Moth; Have His Carcase; Peacock Pie; Alice in Wonderland; The Citadel; Good Companions; Our Hearts were Young and Gay; Memoirs of a Fox-hunting Man; The Healing Knife; First Year Out; Saint Joan; Stars Look Down; Bridge of San Luis Rey; Rogue Herries; Caesar and Cleopatra; Xmas at Cold Comfort Farm; Dark Lady of the Sonnets; The Velvet Deer; Leaves from a Surgeon's Case Book; A Christmas Carol; Craft of Comedy; As You Like It; Lottie Dundass; Plays of John Galsworthy; Provincial Lady in America; She Shanties; Peter Abelard; Actor, Soldier, Poet; The Best of Lamb; Some Essay of Elia; Poems, Plays etc; The White Cliffs; Three Men in a Boat; Confessions of an Opium Eater; In Search of England; Wuthering Heights; Pericles, Prince of Tyre; Poems of Contemporary Women; Crime at the Club; Quality Street; Villette; Major Barbara; Pygmalion; You Never Can Tell; King John; Doctor's Dilemma'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Alice Duer Miller : White Cliffs, The

[List of books read during 1944]: 'The Specialist; All This and Heaven Too; Antony; Uncle Tom's Cabin; Roper's Row; Tom Brown's Schooldays; Life's a Circus; The Keys of the Kingdom; Two Survived; Hamlet; King's Nurse, Beggar's Nurse; The Snow Goose; Gerald; Early Stages; Cross Creek; Footnotes to the Ballet; The Great Ship; Hungry Hill; Hiawatha; Captain Blood; Scaramouche; Heartbreak House; Fortune's Fool; Fifth Form at St Dominic's; Cold Comfort Farm; The Lost King; The count of Monte Cristo; Diary of a Provincial Lady; Frenchman's Creek; Song of Bernadette; Romeo and Juliet; Rebecca; The Surgeon's Destiny; The Killer and the Slain; Anna; King Solomon's Mines; The Black Moth; Have His Carcase; Peacock Pie; Alice in Wonderland; The Citadel; Good Companions; Our Hearts were Young and Gay; Memoirs of a Fox-hunting Man; The Healing Knife; First Year Out; Saint Joan; Stars Look Down; Bridge of San Luis Rey; Rogue Herries; Caesar and Cleopatra; Xmas at Cold Comfort Farm; Dark Lady of the Sonnets; The Velvet Deer; Leaves from a Surgeon's Case Book; A Christmas Carol; Craft of Comedy; As You Like It; Lottie Dundass; Plays of John Galsworthy; Provincial Lady in America; She Shanties; Peter Abelard; Actor, Soldier, Poet; The Best of Lamb; Some Essay of Elia; Poems, Plays etc; The White Cliffs; Three Men in a Boat; Confessions of an Opium Eater; In Search of England; Wuthering Heights; Pericles, Prince of Tyre; Poems of Contemporary Women; Crime at the Club; Quality Street; Villette; Major Barbara; Pygmalion; You Never Can Tell; King John; Doctor's Dilemma'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Jerome K. Jerome : Three Men in a Boat

[List of books read during 1944]: 'The Specialist; All This and Heaven Too; Antony; Uncle Tom's Cabin; Roper's Row; Tom Brown's Schooldays; Life's a Circus; The Keys of the Kingdom; Two Survived; Hamlet; King's Nurse, Beggar's Nurse; The Snow Goose; Gerald; Early Stages; Cross Creek; Footnotes to the Ballet; The Great Ship; Hungry Hill; Hiawatha; Captain Blood; Scaramouche; Heartbreak House; Fortune's Fool; Fifth Form at St Dominic's; Cold Comfort Farm; The Lost King; The count of Monte Cristo; Diary of a Provincial Lady; Frenchman's Creek; Song of Bernadette; Romeo and Juliet; Rebecca; The Surgeon's Destiny; The Killer and the Slain; Anna; King Solomon's Mines; The Black Moth; Have His Carcase; Peacock Pie; Alice in Wonderland; The Citadel; Good Companions; Our Hearts were Young and Gay; Memoirs of a Fox-hunting Man; The Healing Knife; First Year Out; Saint Joan; Stars Look Down; Bridge of San Luis Rey; Rogue Herries; Caesar and Cleopatra; Xmas at Cold Comfort Farm; Dark Lady of the Sonnets; The Velvet Deer; Leaves from a Surgeon's Case Book; A Christmas Carol; Craft of Comedy; As You Like It; Lottie Dundass; Plays of John Galsworthy; Provincial Lady in America; She Shanties; Peter Abelard; Actor, Soldier, Poet; The Best of Lamb; Some Essay of Elia; Poems, Plays etc; The White Cliffs; Three Men in a Boat; Confessions of an Opium Eater; In Search of England; Wuthering Heights; Pericles, Prince of Tyre; Poems of Contemporary Women; Crime at the Club; Quality Street; Villette; Major Barbara; Pygmalion; You Never Can Tell; King John; Doctor's Dilemma'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

H.V. Morton : In Search of England

[List of books read during 1944]: 'The Specialist; All This and Heaven Too; Antony; Uncle Tom's Cabin; Roper's Row; Tom Brown's Schooldays; Life's a Circus; The Keys of the Kingdom; Two Survived; Hamlet; King's Nurse, Beggar's Nurse; The Snow Goose; Gerald; Early Stages; Cross Creek; Footnotes to the Ballet; The Great Ship; Hungry Hill; Hiawatha; Captain Blood; Scaramouche; Heartbreak House; Fortune's Fool; Fifth Form at St Dominic's; Cold Comfort Farm; The Lost King; The count of Monte Cristo; Diary of a Provincial Lady; Frenchman's Creek; Song of Bernadette; Romeo and Juliet; Rebecca; The Surgeon's Destiny; The Killer and the Slain; Anna; King Solomon's Mines; The Black Moth; Have His Carcase; Peacock Pie; Alice in Wonderland; The Citadel; Good Companions; Our Hearts were Young and Gay; Memoirs of a Fox-hunting Man; The Healing Knife; First Year Out; Saint Joan; Stars Look Down; Bridge of San Luis Rey; Rogue Herries; Caesar and Cleopatra; Xmas at Cold Comfort Farm; Dark Lady of the Sonnets; The Velvet Deer; Leaves from a Surgeon's Case Book; A Christmas Carol; Craft of Comedy; As You Like It; Lottie Dundass; Plays of John Galsworthy; Provincial Lady in America; She Shanties; Peter Abelard; Actor, Soldier, Poet; The Best of Lamb; Some Essay of Elia; Poems, Plays etc; The White Cliffs; Three Men in a Boat; Confessions of an Opium Eater; In Search of England; Wuthering Heights; Pericles, Prince of Tyre; Poems of Contemporary Women; Crime at the Club; Quality Street; Villette; Major Barbara; Pygmalion; You Never Can Tell; King John; Doctor's Dilemma'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Wilfred Massey : Crime at the Club

[List of books read during 1944]: 'The Specialist; All This and Heaven Too; Antony; Uncle Tom's Cabin; Roper's Row; Tom Brown's Schooldays; Life's a Circus; The Keys of the Kingdom; Two Survived; Hamlet; King's Nurse, Beggar's Nurse; The Snow Goose; Gerald; Early Stages; Cross Creek; Footnotes to the Ballet; The Great Ship; Hungry Hill; Hiawatha; Captain Blood; Scaramouche; Heartbreak House; Fortune's Fool; Fifth Form at St Dominic's; Cold Comfort Farm; The Lost King; The count of Monte Cristo; Diary of a Provincial Lady; Frenchman's Creek; Song of Bernadette; Romeo and Juliet; Rebecca; The Surgeon's Destiny; The Killer and the Slain; Anna; King Solomon's Mines; The Black Moth; Have His Carcase; Peacock Pie; Alice in Wonderland; The Citadel; Good Companions; Our Hearts were Young and Gay; Memoirs of a Fox-hunting Man; The Healing Knife; First Year Out; Saint Joan; Stars Look Down; Bridge of San Luis Rey; Rogue Herries; Caesar and Cleopatra; Xmas at Cold Comfort Farm; Dark Lady of the Sonnets; The Velvet Deer; Leaves from a Surgeon's Case Book; A Christmas Carol; Craft of Comedy; As You Like It; Lottie Dundass; Plays of John Galsworthy; Provincial Lady in America; She Shanties; Peter Abelard; Actor, Soldier, Poet; The Best of Lamb; Some Essay of Elia; Poems, Plays etc; The White Cliffs; Three Men in a Boat; Confessions of an Opium Eater; In Search of England; Wuthering Heights; Pericles, Prince of Tyre; Poems of Contemporary Women; Crime at the Club; Quality Street; Villette; Major Barbara; Pygmalion; You Never Can Tell; King John; Doctor's Dilemma'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Aeropagitica

'With my scanty pocket-money, high-priced books were beyond my reach; but I was lucky enough, when hunting, as was my want, among the second-hand bookstalls in Newcastle market-place, to light upon some off volumes of Milton?s prose works, which I bought for a few shillings. I read them all ? politics, theology, travels, with touches of autobiography- nothing came amiss to my voracious appetite. Over and over again did I read the Areopagitica, ?that sublime treatise? which, Macaulay tells us, ?every statesman should wear as a sign upon his hand and as frontlets between his eyes?.?

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Burt      Print: Book

  

John Milton : [poems]

?The gentle Cowper was my earliest favourite, a small second-hand copy of his poems, which I bought for eighteen pence, being the first book I bought for myself. It emptied my pocket, but I walked home, as I had walked to Newcastle (a distance some eighteen miles to and fro) with a light head, now and then reading as I fared along. Longfellow, Pope, Milton, Wordsworth and other poets were soon afterwards added to my little collection. I read them all. Many passages have clung to my memory, a life-long possession, giving, with their music, sometimes inspiration, sometimes solace in the conflicts and sorrows of life.?

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Burt      Print: Book

  

Alexander van Humboldt : Cosmos

?Two or three years my senior, Sam, like myself, was acquiring a taste for books. Our tastes were not wholly dissimilar. Both of us read and enjoyed poetry; but while Sam?s more solid reading was in science, especially in astronomy and geology, mine was in history, biography, logic, languages, oratory, and general literature. Sam?s favourite books at this time were Alison?s "History of Europe" and Humboldt?s "Cosmos".?

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Bailey      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babbington Macaulay : History of England

?Macaulay, who had recently died, was greatly in vogue. I had read with enjoyment and advantage his "History of England" and some of his essays.?

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Burt      Print: Book

  

Homer : Odyssey

'In the even read part of Homer's "Odyssey", translated by Alexander Pope, which I like very well, the language being vastly good and the turn of thought and expression beautiful.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Turner      Print: Book

  

Countess Claire-Elisabeth de Remusat : Correspondence (vols 6 and 7)

Henry James to Thomas Seregant Perry, 25 November 1883: "I have just been reading the two last [sixth and seventh] volumes of Mme de Remusat, just out -- her correspondence with her son -- and finding them interestng ..."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Book

  

Francis Parkman : Montcalm and Wolfe

Henry James to Francis Parkman, 24 August 1884: " ... I cannot hold my hand from telling you ... with what high appreciation and genuine gratitude I have been reading your Wolfe and Montcalm ... I have found the right time to read it only during the last fortnight, and it has fascinated me from the first page to the last."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Book

  

Henry James Sr and William James : The Literary Remains of the Late Henry James

Henry James to William James, 2 January 1885: "Three days ago ... came the two copies of Father's (and your) book ... All I have had time to read as yet is the introduction ..."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Book, Unknown

  

Guy de Maupassant : Bel-Ami

Henry James to Theodore E. Child, 30 May 1885: "I ought already to have thanked you for your friendly thought and delicate attention in sending me Maupassant's ineffable novel, which I fell upon and devoured, with the utmost relish and gratitude. It brightened me up, here, for a day or two, amazingly."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Book

  

Henry James : Portrait of a Lady

Robert Louis Stevenson to Henry James, November-early December 1887: "I must break out with the news that I can't bear the Portrait of a Lady. I read it all, and I wept, too; but I can't stand your having written it, and I beg you will write no more of the like."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Louis Stevenson      Print: Unknown

  

William Mason : [items in Dodsley's Miscellanies]

'In Dodsley's "Miscellanies" there are two or three pretty pieces of Mr Mason. Bacon's "Life by Mr Mallet" perhaps you have seen. He is not near so good a Man, I fear, as Mr Mason'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Richardson      Print: Book

  

David Mallett : [Life of Bacon]

'In Dodsley's "Miscellanies" there are two or three pretty pieces of Mr Mason. Bacon's "Life" by Mr Mallet perhaps you have seen. He is not near so good a Man, I fear, as Mr Mason.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Richardson      Print: Book

  

Comtesse de Segur : Les Petites Filles Mod?les

'Rudie inspired in all his children a love of literature, reading aloud to them from his own favourites, the great Victorians, particularly Dickens, and helping them to choose from the library shelves. "I had the run of my father's library", Rosamond remembered. "I was allowed to read anything and did". There was a bookcase in the hall where he would put books sent to him for review, and from these Rosamond, graduating from her beloved Hans Andersen, E. Nesbit and "Les Petites Filles Modeles", began to discover some of the more adult novelists'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Rosamond Lehmann      Print: Book

  

Adam Smith : Wealth of Nations

?There were other books which I then read and studied with care, including Adam Smith?s "Wealth of Nations" and Mill?s "Political Economy". This was not a kind of literature to borrow from public libraries, but to have in one?s possessions.?

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Burt      Print: Book

  

John Stuart Mill : Political Economy

?There were other books which I then read and studied with care, including Adam Smith?s "Wealth of Nations" and Mill?s "Political Economy". This was not a kind of literature to borrow from public libraries, but to have in one?s possessions.?

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Burt      Print: Book

  

Compton McKenzie : Sinister Street

'I infinitely regret to say that having read the 2 vols of "Sinister Street", I don?t think it is permanent work; the beginning & the end are the best.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Arnold Bennett      Print: Book

  

Louis Sebastien Mercier : Mon Bonnet de Nuit

'While at Mitchelstown she brushed up on her French by reading Madame de Genlis's "Letters on Education", Louis Sebastien Mercier's comedy "Mon Bonnet de Nuit", and the Baroness de Montoliere's novel "Caroline de Litchfield". The first she pronounced "wonderfully clever", and it may well have proved helpful to her as a teacher; the last she described as "One of the prettiest things I have ever read", and it perhaps suggested that her own life could serve as the basis of a sentimental novel'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Wollstonecraft      Print: Book

  

Baroness de Montoliere : Caroline de Litchfield

'While at Mitchelstown she brushed up on her French by reading Madame de Genlis's "Letters on Education", Louis Sebastien Mercier's comedy "Mon Bonnet de Nuit", and the Baroness de Montoliere's novel "Caroline de Litchfield". The first she pronounced "wonderfully clever", and it may well have proved helpful to her as a teacher; the last she described as "One of the prettiest things I have ever read", and it perhaps suggested that her own life could serve as the basis of a sentimental novel'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Wollstonecraft      Print: Book

  

Guy de Maupassant : Notre Coeur

Henry James to Henrietta Reubell, 7 July 1890: "I have read Notre Coeur but haven't looked at Bourget in the Figaro."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Unknown

  

[probably] Christian Gotthilf Salzmann : [probably] Moralisches Elementarbuch

'I am so fatigued with poring over a German book, I scarcely can collect my thoughts or even spell English words.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Wollstonecraft      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

'Whenever I read Milton's description of paradise - the happiness, which he so poetically describes fills me with benevolent satisfaction - yet, I cannot help viewing them, I mean the first pair - as if they were my inferiors - inferiors because they could find happiness in a world like this.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Wollstonecraft      Print: Book

  

William James : Principles of Psychology

Henry James to William James, 6 February 1891: " ... I blush to say I haven't had freedom of mind or cerebral freshness ... to tackle -- more than dipping in here and there -- your mighty and magnificent book ..."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Book

  

August Heinrich Hoffmann von Fallersleben : [a bacchanalian poem]

'When the cigars came, Hoffmann was requested to read some of his poetry, and he gave us a bacchanalian poem with great spirit... little rain sent us into the house, and when we were seated in an elegant drawing room, opening into a large music salon, we had more reading from Hoffmann, and from the French artist who with a tremulous voice pitched in a minor key, read us some rather pretty sentimentalities of his own'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot (pseud)      Manuscript: Unknown, own poem

  

Donagh McDonagh : Letters of People in Love

'Read "Letters of People in Love". Quite good.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Walter de la Mare : Henry Brocken

'Read "Henry Brocken" all evening, as had finished prep. It's enchanting.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Maurice Maeterlinck : Life of the Bee, The

'Spent evening dancing, and reading Maeterlinck's "Life of the Bee".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

'We read "Paradise Lost" in Gen. English & I tried to look enthusiastic, but I really can't appreciate Milton. He's so unreal and unalive. I must try to read a lot of him and get over this.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Thomas Moore : Memoirs of the Life of Sheridan

'Bad headache all day. Gross Cophta in the evening. Looked through Moore's Life of Sheridan in the morning - a firstrate specimen of bad biographical writing'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

Thomas Armstrong : Crowthers of Bankdam

[In bed recovering from gastro-enteritis] 'I read "Crowthers" all day, and loved it.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Naomi Michison : Conquered, The

'I finished "The Conquered", and wrote to Uncle John, who sent me a really wizard book - 10/ - called "People and Places"'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

A.G. Macdonell : England their England

'Spent afternoon reading "Twelfth Night"... read more of "England their England" which is a scream.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Christopher Marlowe : Jew of Malta, The

'Reading "The Jew of Malta", which in spite of critics is the most interesting of the plays I've read.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Thomas More : Utopia

'Slept all morning, then read quite a lot of "Utopia" in afternoon, & really it is very interesting (once you get over the spelling), & he had some very advanced ideas.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Thomas More : Utopia

'Settled down to 3 hours solid slogging at "Utopia", & got it read & notes begun. Spent evening finishing "England their England", which I loved - it's most clever & interesting.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

A.G. Macdonell : England their England

'Settled down to 3 hours solid slogging at "Utopia", & got it read & notes begun. Spent evening finishing "England their England", which I loved - it's most clever & interesting.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

John Milton : unknown

'Had a really wizard lecture from [Prof.] Renwick on Milton, in which he read a good lot of Milton and Shakespeare to us, and he certainly can read.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Marcelin Marbot : Memoires

Henry James to Robert Louis Stevenson, 15 April 1892: "I send you by this post the magnificent Memoires de Marbot, which should have gone to you sooner by my hand if I had sooner read them ..."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Book

  

Alice James : The Diary of Alice James

Henry James, in letters to his brother, and sister-in-law, Mr and Mrs William James (25 May 1894; 28 May 1894) discusses his reading of his copy of his sister Alice James's diary.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Book

  

George Meredith : Lord Ormont and His Aminta

Henry James to Edmund Gosse, 22 August 1894: " ... I have vowed not to open Lourdes [by Zola] till I shall have closed with a furious bang the unspeakable Lord Ormont, which I have been reading at the maximum rate of ten pages -- ten insufferable and unprofitable pages, a day ... I have finished, at this rate, but the first volume ..."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Book

  

Henry James : stories

Henry James to Mrs. Henry James Sr., 8 May 1876: "The other day I was at the house of a dreadful old lion huntress, Mme. Blaze de Bury -- an Englishwoman with a French husband and daughter. She invited me, unsolicited, from having read my threadbare tales in the Revue des Deux Mondes ..."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Mme. Blaze de Bury      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : Life

Henry James to Mrs. Henry James Sr., 8 May 1876: "I have been reading Macaulay's Life with extreme interest and entertainment, and admiration of the intellectual robustness of the man."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Book

  

Henry James : Roderick Hudson

Henry James to Wiliam James, 28 February 1877: " ... [Henry Sidgwick] has read Roderick Hudson (!) and asked me to stop with him at Cambridge."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Sidgwick      Print: Unknown

  

Henry James : The American

Henry James to Henry James Sr., 19 April 1878: "Two days since I dined with Frederick Macmillan to meet Mr Grove, the editor of their magazine, who had just been reading The American ... 'with great delight.'"

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Archibald Grove      Print: Unknown

  

Henry James : "French essays"

Henry James to Henry James Sr., 29 May 1878: " ... Sir Charles Dilke ... appears to have found time ... to read and be 'struck' by my French essays."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Sir Charles Dilke      Print: Unknown

  

Homer : [hymn to Aphrodite]

'Gruppe read us a translation of one of the Homeric Hymns - Aphrodite - which is really beautiful. It is a sort of Gegenstuck to "Der Gott und die Bayadere". He has struck out 150 lines which he believes to be interpolated and the connection of the poem appears perfect'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: [Professor] Gruppe      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : History of England

'In the evening began Macaulay's History of England. Richard III and G's M.S. on Goethe's scientific labours'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

Cumming : unknown

'Began... to read Cumming for article in Westminster'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

Sydney Smith : [Letters]

'We are reading in the evenings now, Sydney Smith's letters, Boswell, Whewell's History of Inductive Sciences, the Odyssey and occasionally Heine's Reisebilder. I began the second Book of the Iliad in Greek this morning'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot and G.H. Lewes     Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

William James : article on "Brute and Human Intellect"

Henry James to Mrs Henry James Sr., 18 January 1879: "I have just been reading ... [William James's] two articles -- the Brute and Human Intellect and the one in Mind ... I perused them with great interest, sufficient comprehension, and extreme profit."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Serial / periodical

  

William James : article

Henry James to Mrs Henry James Sr., 18 January 1879: "I have just been reading ... [William James's] two articles -- the Brute and Human Intellect and the one in Mind ... I perused them with great interest, sufficient comprehension, and extreme profit."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Henry James : Daisy Miller

Henry James to Mrs F. H. Hill, 21 March 1879, on his characterisation of Lord Lambeth in Daisy Miller: "That he says 'I say' rather too many times is very probable (I thought so, quite, myself, in reading over the thing as a book): but that strikes me as a rather venial flaw."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Book

  

Henry James Sr : [book]

Henry James to Mrs Henry James Sr., 8 April 1879: "I have received father's book from Trubner -- but really to read it I must lay it aside till the summer. I have however dipped into it and found it a great fascination."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Book

  

Henry James : review of Correspondence de C. A. Sainte-Beuve

Henry James to Henry James Sr., 11 January 1880: "I know there are quite too many 'I's' in my Sainte-Beuve -- they shocked me very much when I saw it in print, and they would never have stayed had I seen it in proof."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Henry James : Daisy Miller

Leon Edel notes: "In the weeks after his mother's death H[enry]J[ames] converted 'Daisy Miler' into a play, and before sailing read it to Mrs. [Isabella Stewart]Gardner."

Unknown
Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      

  

William James : letter to Henry James Sr

Henry James to William James, 1 January 1883, on having received William's farewell letter to their father too late for Henry James Sr to see it before he died: "I went out yesterday (Sunday) morning, to the Cambridge cemetary ... and stood beside his grave a long time and read him your letter of farewell -- which I am sure he heard somewhere out of the depths of the still, bright winter air."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Manuscript: Letter

  

G. W. Smalley : article on American novels

Henry James to G. W. Smalley, 21 February 1883: "I have just been reading in the Tribune your letter of Jan. 25, in which you devote a few lines to the silly article in the Quarterly on American Novels, etc [goes on to correct points in this]."

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Homer : Iliad

?About this time I was delighted by the acquisition of two books, the existence of which, until then, had been unknown to me. One was the second volume of Homer?s "Iliad", translated by Alexander Pope, with notes by Madame Dacier; and the other was a small volume of miscellaneous poems, by John Milton. Homer I read with an absorbed attention which soon enabled me to commit nearly every line to memory.?

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Bamford      Print: Book

  

John Milton : [miscellaneous poems]

?About this time I was delighted by the acquisition of two books, the existence of which, until then, had been unknown to me. One was the second volume of Homer?s "Iliad", translated by Alexander Pope, with notes by Madame Dacier; and the other was a small volume of Miscellaneous Poems, by John Milton. Homer I read with an absorbed attention which soon enabled me to commit nearly every line to memory.?

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Bamford      Print: Book

  

Homer : Iliad

?Whilst in Mr W?s employ, I combined my poetic readings at all leisure moments. I procured and read speedily a complete "Iliad" in English. Some of Shakespeare?s works having fallen in my way, I read them with avidity, as I did almost every other book, and though deeply interested by his historical characters and passages, I never either then or since relished his blank verse, or that of any other poet.?

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Bamford      Print: Book

  

John Milton : [miscellaneous works]

?Milton?s miscellaneous works were still my favourites. I copied many of his poems into a writing book, and this I did, not only an account of the pleasure which I felt in their repetition, and in the appropriation ? so to speak ? of the ideas, but also as a means for improvement of my handwriting, which had continued to be very indifferent. The "Odyssey" and "Aeniad", which I also procured and read about this time, seemed tame and languid, whilst the stirring call of the old Iliadic battle trumpet was ringing in my ears, and vibrating within my heart. In short, I read or attentively conned [sic] over, every book I could buy or borrow, and as I retained a pretty clear idea of what I read, I became rather more than commonly proficient in book knowledge considering that I was only a better sort of porter in a warehouse.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Bamford      Print: Book

  

Jean le Rond D'Alembert : Unknown

'You are not to think that I am fretful. I have long accustomed my mind to look upon the future with a sedate aspect; and at any rate, my hopes have never yet failed me. A French Author (D'Alembert, one of the few persons who deserve the honourable epithet of honest man) whom I was lately reading, remarks that one who devotes his life to learning ought to carry for his motto-Liberty, Truth, Poverty; for her that fears the latter can never have the former.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carlyle      Print: Unknown

  

Oliver Goldsmith : History of England

?As spring and autumn were our only really busy seasons, I had occasionally , during other parts of the year, considerable leisure, which, if I could procure a book that I considered at all worth the reading, was spent with such a book of my desk, in the little recess of the packing room. Here, therefore, I had opportunities for reading many books of which I had only heard the names before, such as Robertson?s "History of Scotland", Goldsmith?s "History of England", Rollin?s "Ancient History", Hume?s "Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire", Anachaises? "Travels in Greece"; and many other works on travels, geography, and antiquities.?

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Bamford      Print: Book

  

David Hume : Decline and fall of the Roman empire

?As spring and autumn were our only really busy seasons, I had occasionally , during other parts of the year, considerable leisure, which, if I could procure a book that I considered at all worth the reading, was spent with such a book of my desk, in the little recess of the packing room. Here, therefore, I had opportunities for reading many books of which I had only heard the names before, such as Robertson?s "History of Scotland", Goldsmith?s "History of England", Rollin?s "Ancient History", Hume?s "Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire", Anachaises? "Travels in Greece"; and many other works on travels, geography, and antiquities.?

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Bamford      Print: Book

  

James Macpherson : Ossian

'... I also enlarged my acquaintance with English literature, read Johnson's "Lives of the Poets", and, as a consequence, many of their productions also. Macpherson's "Ossain", whilst it gave me a glimpse of our most ancient love, interested my feelings and absorbed my attention. I also bent my thoughts on more practical studies, and at one time had nearly the whole of Lindsey Murray's Grammar stored in my memory, although I never so far benefited by it as to become ready at pausing.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Bamford      Print: Book

  

Lindley Murray : Murray's Grammar

'... I also enlarged my acquaintance with English literature, read Johnson's "Lives of the Poets", and, as a consequence, many of their productions also. Macpherson's "Ossain", whilst it gave me a glimpse of our most ancient love, interested my feelings and absorbed my attention. I also bent my thoughts on more practical studies, and at one time had nearly the whole of Lindley Murray's "Grammar" stored in my memory, although I never so far benefited by it as to become ready at pausing.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Bamford      Print: Book

  

Mostyn John Armstrong : Scotch Atlas; or description of the kingdom of Scotland: divided into counties, with the subdivisions of sherifdoms; shewing their respective boundaries and extent, soil, produce, ... also their cities, chief towns, seaports, mountains, ...

[Marginalia]: Three entries (Perth, Haddington and Fife & Kinross) have been annotated with some extra information ex. from the Perth entry 'At a small village calld [sic] Pitcaithly within a mile of Dumbarny, 25 miles from Perth, is a well whose water is remarkable for curing sore eyes. Near Loch Dochart in Breadalbane, is Ben More, among the highest hills in Scotland.'

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis Wemyss      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

'It was about this time that I first met with Milton's "Paradise Lost", in a thick volume with engravings and copious notes, probably a copy of Bishop Newton's edition of that noble poem. I found it, however, little better than "a sealed book". Its versification puzzled me, while the loftiness of its subjects confused my understanding.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

James Thomson : The Seasons

'I had been made the more anxious to get some spare time, because several books which I had not before seen now fell in my way. This was through the courtesy of my young master whose kindly feelings I have already noticed. He now gave me free access to his little library, in which were Enfield's "Speaker", Goldsmith's "Geography", an abridged "History of Rome", a "History of England", Thomson's "Seasons", "The Citizen of the World", "The Vicar of Wakefield", and some other books the titles of which I do not now remember. These books furnished me with a large amount of amusing and instructive reading.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

Oliver Goldsmith : Citizen of the World, The

'I had been made the more anxious to get some spare time, because several books which I had not before seen now fell in my way. This was through the courtesy of my young master whose kindly feelings I have already noticed. He now gave me free access to his little library, in which were Enfield's "Speaker", Goldsmith's "Geography", an abridged "History of Rome", a "History of England", Thomson's "Seasons", "The Citizen of the World", "The Vicar of Wakefield", and some other books the titles of which I do not now remember. These books furnished me with a large amount of amusing and instructive reading.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

Oliver Goldsmith : Vicar of Wakefield, The

'I had been made the more anxious to get some spare time, because several books which I had not before seen now fell in my way. This was through the courtesy of my young master whose kindly feelings I have already noticed. He now gave me free access to his little library, in which were Enfield's "Speaker", Goldsmith's "Geography", an abridged "History of Rome", a "History of England", Thomson's "Seasons", "The Citizen of the World", "The Vicar of Wakefield", and some other books the titles of which I do not now remember. These books furnished me with a large amount of amusing and instructive reading.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

James Thomson : Seasons, The

'I pursued each of them with much interest, but especially the "Seasons". I found this to be just the book I had wanted. It commended itself to my warmest approbation, immediately on my perceiving its character and design...'[continues to describe impact of the book at length]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

David Simpson : A Plea for Religion and the Sacred Writings

'Somewhere about this time I met with a volume to which I am much indebted. This was a copy of Simpson's "Plea for Religion and the Sacred Writings" - concerning which I have heard it said that it ought rather to have been called "A Plea for Infidelity" because of its dwelling so much upon the corruptions of Christianity and the inconsistent deportment of some among its ministers.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

George Meredith : The Shaving of Shagpat: An Arabian Entertainment

'Read the Shaving of Shagpat'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: Book

  

David Masson : [essay on the Life of Chatterton]

'In the evenings I have been reading Masson's Essays - "The Three Devils" and Chatterton's Life - and this evening I have read some of Trench's Calderon'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: Unknown

  

David Masson : 'The Three Devils'

'In the evenings I have been reading Masson's Essays - "The Three Devils" and Chatterton's Life - and this evening I have read some of Trench's Calderon'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Unknown, probably inbook publ. 1856

  

Pierre Beaumarchais : M?moires contre Goezman

'I am reading in the evenings the Memoirs of Beaumarchais and Milne Edwards's Zoology'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

Henri Milne-Edwards : [work on Zoology]

'I am reading in the evenings the Memoirs of Beaumarchais and Milne Edwards's Zoology'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

Henri Milne-Edwards : [work on Zoology]

'I have continued reading Milne-Edwards aloud, and have also read Harriet Martineau's article on Missions in the "Westminster", and one or two articles in the "National". Reading to myself Harvey's "Sea-side Book", and "The Lover's Seat".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot (pseud)      Print: Book

  

Harriet Martineau : [article on Missions in the Westminster Review]

'I have continued reading Milne-Edwards aloud, and have also read Harriet Martineau's article on Missions in the "Westminster", and one or two articles in the "National". Reading to myself Harvey's "Sea-side Book", and "The Lover's Seat".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot (pseud)      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Harriet Martineau : History of the Peace: Being a History of England from 1816 to 1854

'Began the Ajax of Sophocles. Also Miss Martineau's History of the Peace'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

Harriet Martineau : The history of the British Empire in India

'In the evenings of late, we have been reading Harriet Martineau's sketch of "The British Empire in India", and are now following it up with Macaulay's articles of Clive and Hastings. We have lately read H.M.'s Introduction to the "History of the Peace" and have begun the "History of the Thirty Years Peace".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group:      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : Essays on Lord Clive And Warren Hastings

'In the evenings of late, we have been reading Harriet Martineau's sketch of "The British Empire in India", and are now following it up with Macaulay's articles of Clive and Hastings. We have lately read H.M.'s Introduction to the "History of the Peace" and have begun the "History of the Thirty Years Peace".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group:      Print: Book

  

Harriet Martineau : The history of England during the thirty years' peace : 1816-1846

'In the evenings of late, we have been reading Harriet Martineau's sketch of "The British Empire in India", and are now following it up with Macaulay's articles of Clive and Hastings. We have lately read H.M.'s Introduction to the "History of the Peace" and have begun the "History of the Thirty Years Peace".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group:      Print: Book

  

Bernard de Montfaucon : Antiquity explained, and represented in sculptures, by the learned Father Montfaucon, translated into English by David Humphreys,

[Marginalia]; Several pp of ms notes copied from another related work laid into v.1. Notes are entitled 'Extract from the 1st volume of Voyages et Recherches dans la Grece par le Chev.er P.O. Brondsted de l'Ile de Ceos'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Drummond Erskine      Print: Book

  

Bernard de Montfaucon : Antiquity explained, and represented in sculptures, by the learned Father Montfaucon, translated into English by David Humphreys

[Marginalia]: very brief annotations, bookmarks and marginal marks, indicating active use when on visit to Paris. Also has several tiny samples of fabric pinned into inside back cover with some notes eg "'ong gloves 2-16'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Magdalene Erskine      Print: Book

  

John Milton : [poems]

'It was at this time that I read the remaining seven volumes of the "Spectator"; to which I added the "Rambler", the "Tatler", and some others of the "British Essayists". I also read the poetical works of Milton, Addison, Goldsmith, Gray, Collins, Falconer, Pomfret, Akenside, Mrs. Rowe, with others which I cannot now clearly call to mind. I remember, however, to have read Gay's poems. These gave me more than usual satisfaction. I was much amused with his "Trivia, or the Art of Walking London Streets" but I was especially pleased with his admirably burlesque "pastorals". These just squared with my humour, for I had then, as I have ever had, an utter dislike to the sickening stuff that is called the pastoral poetry...I must not omit to mention the pleasure I derived from reading a poem called "The Village Curate", which, I think, has fallen into unmerited oblivion.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

Jeanne-Antoinette Poisson marquise de Pompadour : Suite d'estampes gravees par Madame la marquise de Pompadour d'apres les pierre gravees de Guay graveur du Roy

[Marginalia]: 8 leaves of ms notes, in ink, in French, have been bound in at the beginning of the volume. They consist of an introduction praising those who protect and encourage the arts, including Madame la Pompadour, 'who brought fame to this series of etchings', followed by a description of each etching. There is also a single sheet, in a different hand, containing more notes related to the item.

Century:      Reader/Listener/Group: Anon      Print: Book

  

Christoph Christian Sturm : Reflections on the Works of God and of His Providence

'While walking to Hampstead, I strayed into a copse not far from my road, where I seated myself upon the trunk of a tree, and read, with no small pleasure, several of the papers contained in that highly entertaining book, "Sturm's Reflections on the Works of God". As I read these, surrounded by many of the objects upon which they so pleasingly descant, I was enabled to look "through nature up to nature's God"; to hold, as it were, converse with that glorious and beneficient Being, and to recognise Him as a father and a friend.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

Harriet Martineau : History of the Thirty Years Peace

'Gave up Miss Martineau's "History" last night after reading some hundred pages in the second volume. She has a sentimental, rhetorical style in this history which is fatiguing and not instructive. But her history of the Reform Movement is very interesting'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot (pseud)      Print: Book

  

Edward Holton James : two stories

Henry James to Edward Holton James, 15 February 1896: 'For the two stories in the "Harvard Magazine" I am [...] gratefully indebted to you. I have read them with a searching of spirit (to begin with) inevitable to one who has in a manner set an example and who sees it (in his afternoon of life) inexorably and fatally followed.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Lady Sidney Owenson Morgan : France

'I know not if there be a Goddess of Sloth - tho' considering that this of all our passions is the least turbulent and most victorious, it could not without partiality be left destitute - But if there be, she certainly looks on with an approving smile - when in a supine posture, I lie for hours with my eyes fixed upon the pages of Lady Morgan's France or the travels of Faujas St Fond - my mind seldon taking the pains even to execrate the imbecile materialism, the tawdry gossiping of the former, or to pity the infirm speculations and the already antiquated mineralogy of the latter.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carlyle      Print: Book

  

Lady Sidney Morgan : Roderick, the Last of the Goths

'I know not if there be a Goddess of Sloth - tho' considering that this of all our passions is the least turbulent and most victorious, it could not without partiality be left destitute - But if there be, she certainly looks on with an approving smile - when in a supine posture, I lie for hours with my eyes fixed upon the pages of Lady Morgan's France or the travels of Faujas St Fond ... What shall I say to the woebegone Roderick last of the Goths; and others of a similar stamp? They go through my brain as light goes thro' an achromatic telescope.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carlyle      Print: Book

  

Christopher Marlowe : 

'In the [italics]Autobiography[end italics] he tells us of the impact of Byron on him and his friend Dave: "His influence on Dave was so great that it was publicly shown to all the boys and girls in the chapel's schoolroom... While we were playing kiss in the ring, singing and laughing... Dave would lean his figure... against a pillar, biting his lips and frowning at our merrymaking"... His friend soon tired of this Byronic posing, but Davies marks the occasion as the first time he was really attracted to poetry with enjoyment and serious purpose. He went on to read Shelley, Marlowe's plays, and some further Shakespeare. Wordsworth failed to attract him, though he later studied him very diligently'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: William Henry Davies      Print: Book

  

J. W. Mackail : The Life of William Morris

Henry James to Charles Eliot Norton, 28 November 1899 (in letter begun 24 November 1899): 'I gather [...] that you have read Mackail's Morris [...] I felt much moved, after reading the book, to try to write [...] something positively vivid about it; but we are in a moment of such excruciating vulgarity that nothing worth doing about anything or anyone seems to be wanted or welcomed anywhere.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Book

  

Katherine Prescott Wormeley : MS notes to Balzac's Letters

Henry James to Katherine Prescott Wormeley, 8 February 1900, thanking her for sending him a proof copy of her preface to her translation [of Balzac's Letters], and accompanying MS notes: 'I deeply appreciate the admirable and generous labour that prepared for me the ms. notes to Balzac's Letters and that accompanied the Preface to your translation. [...] I have read with care every word of your preface and notes -- as I had already read the "Roman d'Amour", and bought and read much of the "Lettres a l'Etrangere".'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Katherine Prescott Wormeley : Preface [on Balzac]

Henry James to Katherine Prescott Wormeley, 8 February 1900, thanking her for sending him a proof copy of her preface to her translation [of Balzac's Letters], and accompanying MS notes: 'I deeply appreciate the admirable and generous labour that prepared for me the ms. notes to Balzac's Letters and that accompanied the Preface to your translation. [...] I have read with care every word of your preface and notes -- as I had already read the "Roman d'Amour", and bought and read much of the "Lettres a l'Etrangere".'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: proof

  

Urbain Mengin : Italie des Romantiques

Henry James to Urbain Mengin, 1 January 1903: 'Your great handsome wide-margined large-printed, yellow-covered "Italie des Romantiques" came to me safely more months ago than I have the courage to confess to in round numbers [...] I have in any case attentively and appreciatively read it; finding in it much entertaining matter very succinctly and agreeably presented'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Book

  

David Ramsay : History of the American Revolution, The

'When at home I usually retired to my garret, where I employed myself in either reading or working... In reading I usually sat in the Oriental, or, to use a less pompous word, in the tailor's posture, and thus had no need of either chair or table... The books I read at this time related chiefly to North America. Among the chief of them were Ramsay's "History of the American Revolution", Smith's "Travels in Canada and the United States", and Parkinson's "Travels in North America".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

John Smith : Travels in Canada and the United States

'When at home I usually retired to my garret, where I employed myself in either reading or working... In reading I usually sat in the Oriental, or, to use a less pompous word, in the tailor's posture, and thus had no need of either chair or table... The books I read at this time related chiefly to North America. Among the chief of them were Ramsay's "History of the American Revolution", Smith's "Travels in Canada and the United States", and Parkinson's "Travels in North America".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

Auguste Comte : Catechism Of Positive Religion, The

'We have just finished reading aloud "Pere Goriot" - a hateful book... I have been reading lately and have nearly finished Comte's "Catechism". We have also read aloud "Tom Brown's School Days" with much disappointment. It is an unpleasant, unveracious book'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot (pseud)      Print: Book

  

Thomas a Kempis : Imitation of Christ, The (?)

'I am reading Thomas a Kempis.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot (pseud)      Print: Book

  

Robert Bloomfield : [Poems]

'At one of these sales I bought a copy of "Bloomfield's Poems", but not so cheaply as to encourage me to combine my biddings. I read Bloomfield with much interest, as I also did a copy of Montgomery's "Wanderer in Switzerland, and other Poems". Being at the time in poor health of body, at which times my imaginative faculty has always been morbibly active, I was unwise to read poetry of this class, which, under the circumstances, was more likely to excite uneasy feelings than to invigorate the mind. And thus it fell out; for while I read of rural scenes and also of the comparative quietude and the superior happiness of country life, I grew uneasy and heartsick of the noisy and restless town...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

James Montgomery : Wanderer in Switzerland, and other Poems

'At one of these sales I bought a copy of "Bloomfield's Poems", but not so cheaply as to encourage me to combine my biddings. I read Bloomfield with much interest, as I also did a copy of Montgomery's "Wanderer in Switzerland, and other Poems". Being at the time in poor health of body, at which times my imaginative faculty has always been morbibly active, I was unwise to read poetry of this class, which, under the circumstances, was more likely to excite uneasy feelings than to invigorate the mind. And thus it fell out; for while I read of rural scenes and also of the comparative quietude and the superior happiness of country life, I grew uneasy and heartsick of the noisy and restless town...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

William James : [Unidentified recently published writings]

Henry James to William James, 23 November 1905: 'I can read [italics]you[end italics] with rapture -- having three weeks ago spent three or four days with Manton Marble at Brighton and found in his hands ever so many of your recent papers and discourses, which having margins of mornings in my room, through both breakfasting and lunching there [...] I found time to read several of'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Unknown

  

Henry James : "Covering End"

Leon Edel notes, regarding Henry James's letter to James B. Pinker of 14 October 1907: 'The eminent actor Johnston Forbes-Robertson read H[enry]J[ames]'s story "Covering End" in "The Two Magics" (1898) and proposed that the novelist turn it into a play for him.'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Johnston Forbes-Robertson      Print: Book

  

William James : Pragmatism: A New Name for Some Old Ways of Thinking

Henry James to William James, 17 October 1907: 'Why the devil I didn't write to you after reading your "Pragmatism" [...] I can't now explain save by the very fact of the spell itself (of interest and enthralment) that the book cast upon me'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Book

  

William James : journal articles on psychology

Henry James to William James, 17 October 1907: 'Why the devil I didn't write to you after reading your "Pragmatism" [...] I can't now explain save by the very fact of the spell itself (of interest and enthralment) that the book cast upon me [...] I have been absorbing a number more of your followings-up of the matter in the American (Journal of Psychology[?]) which your devouring devotee Manton Marble of Brighton [...] plied'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Serial / periodical

  

George Meredith : Letters

Henry James to Edmund Gosse, 10 October 1912: 'I have received within a day or two dear old George Meredith's "Letters"; and, though I haven't been able yet very much to go into them, I catch their emanation of something so admirable, and, on the whole, so baffled and so tragic. We must have some more talk of them -- and also of Wells's book ["Marriage"], with which I am however having much difficulty. I am not so much struck with its hardness as with its weakness and looseness, the utter going by the board of any real self respect of composition and expression.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Book

  

Thomas Campbell : The Pleasures of Hope

'It was about this time that I first read that very beautiful poem, "The Pleasures of Hope". I also repersued a large portion of Cowper's Poems; and, in spite of the unfavourable accounts of it given by critics, resolved upon reading Thomson's "Liberty". This resolution I carried into effect, to my very considerable amusement, if not instruction. As to its poetical merits, I did not venture to sit in judgement upon them.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

James Thomson : Liberty, a Poem

'It was about this time that I first read that very beautiful poem, "The Pleasures of Hope". I also repersued a large portion of Cowper's Poems; and, in spite of the unfavourable accounts of it given by critics, resolved upon reading Thomson's "Liberty". This resolution I carried into effect, to my very considerable amusement, if not instruction. As to its poetical merits, I did not venture to sit in judgement upon them.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

Homer : Iliad

'By courtesy of a friend I had the loan of Mr. Pope's poetical works together with his translations of Homer's "Iliad" and "Odyssey". I also read Mr. Hervey's "Theron and Aspasia", but with no great pleasure, because of its chiefly dwelling upon controverted points of theology. I was induced to read it by a sense of what was due to the request of a valued friend. As to Mr. Pope's works and translations, I read them with much satisfaction. In passing, I must observe that of Homer's poems I greatly preferred the "Odyssey"; for the "Iliad" was too full of warlike descriptions for one of my pacific temper. I still retain this preference. My reading times were at my meals, and after I had left work in the evening.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

Homer : Odyssey

'By courtesy of a friend I had the loan of Mr. Pope's poetical works together with his translations of Homer's "Iliad" and "Odyssey". I also read Mr. Hervey's "Theron and Aspasia", but with no great pleasure, because of its chiefly dwelling upon controverted points of theology. I was induced to read it by a sense of what was due to the request of a valued friend. As to Mr. Pope's works and translations, I read them with much satisfaction. In passing, I must observe that of Homer's poems I greatly preferred the "Odyssey"; for the "Iliad" was too full of warlike descriptions for one of my pacific temper. I still retain this preference. My reading times were at my meals, and after I had left work in the evening.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

Henry Mackenzie : Man of Feeling and other tales

'I was unable to work for a fortnight through lameness... While laid by from work, I read Mr. MacKenzie's "Man of Feeling" and other tales. I thought them a little too highly coloured to be of any great use, considered as pictures of men and manners.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

Barry Edward O'Meara : Napoleon in Exile, or a Voice from St Helena

'During this year I read an odd volume of that curious publication, the "Anti-Jacobin-Review", from which I gathered a little that pleased me. Among other things I met with some views respecting the conduct of Judas Iscariot towards his Divine Master which to me were quite new. I, however, thought them both reasonable and probable. I also read Mr. O'Meara's "Voice from St Helena", Dr. Henderson's "Travels in Iceland", and Captain Parry's "Narrative" of his Arctic Voyage. I must here beg the reader to remember that henceforth when I say that I have read any book it will only mean that I gave it a hasty perusal, for I had no time for close reading.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

J.-C.-L. Simonde de Sismondi : Historical View of the Literature of the South of Europe

'By favour of my friendly draper I also had the satisfaction of looking over the elegantly written and very entertaining "Letters" of Mr. Gray together with M. Sismondi's "History of the Literature of the South of Europe".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

Mary Wortley, Lady Montagu : Letters

?While in this state I read the "Letters" of Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, and some of Dr Beattie?s and Mr Hume?s ?Essays?, together with part of Dr Beattie?s ?Essay on Truth?.?

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

James Arminius : [works on theology and account of his life]

?As to reading, I had neither time not strength for more than a very little, yet I did something; as I looked through a translation of the works of that eminent divine, James Arminius, with which I was well satisfied, but especially so with the prefixed memoir of his life. I had also, for a few days, the loan of Mr. Montgomery?s ?Lectures on poetry?, a book which I should have been glad to read thoroughly.?

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

James Montgomery : Lectures on poetry

?As to reading, I had neither time not strength for more than a very little, yet I did something; as I looked through a translation of the works of that eminent divine, James Arminius, with which I was well satisfied, but especially so with the prefixed memoir of his life. I had also, for a few days, the loan of Mr. Montgomery?s ?Lectures on poetry?, a book which I should have been glad to read thoroughly.?

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

Compton Mackenzie : Sinister Street (vol.1)

Henry James to Compton Mackenzie, 21 January 1914: 'When I wrote to [James B.] Pinker I had only read "S[inister].S[treet]"., but I have now taken "Carnival" in persistent short draughts -- which is how I took "S[inister].S[treet]". and is how I take anything I take at all'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Book

  

Compton Mackenzie : Carnival

Henry James to Compton Mackenzie, 21 January 1914: 'When I wrote to [James B.] Pinker I had only read "S[inister].S[treet]"., but I have now taken "Carnival" in persistent short draughts -- which is how I took "S[inister].S[treet]". and is how I take anything I take at all'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Book

  

Compton Mackenzie : Sinister Street (vol 2)

Henry James, in letter of 21 November 1914 to Hugh Walpole, writes of his bemusement at the second volume of Compton Mackenzie's "Sinister Street": 'I don't know what it means [...] the thing affects me on the whole as a mere wide waste.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry James      Print: Book

  

John Middleton : The laws and acts of the first Parliament

[Marginalia]: brief ink additions to some 6 pp of the text e.g p.57 against XXXVIII is the note 'This act is ... to be payed from imported commodities ...'; p. 49 against XXVIII is the note 'This act [word deleted] reshinded [sic]'.

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Johannes [ie John] Chrystie      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babbington Macaulay : [essays]

?Macaulay, who had recently died, was greatly in vogue. I had read with enjoyment and advantage his "History of England" and some of his essays.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Burt      Print: Unknown

  

John Millar : Historical View of the English Government, An

'Without reluctance, I push aside the massy quarto of Millar on the English government, to perform ther more pelasing duty of writing a few lines to you, by the conveyance of Mr Duncan.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carlyle      Print: Book

  

John Millar : Historical View of the English Government, An

'I have read Millar on the English government &c-'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carlyle      Print: Book

  

Mary Russell Mitford : Our Village

'The title is, The Neighbours ? just a title for Miss Austen you see! ? And for Miss Austen, you shall praise her as much as you please. She is delightful exquisite in her degree! ? only I wdnt have one of your dear hands "cut off" that you shd "write one page like her?s with the other", - because, really & earnestly, your Village and Belford Regis are more charming to me than her pages in congregation. She wants (admit it honestly, because you know she wants it) she wants a little touch of poetry. Her "neighbours" walk about & gossip, all unconscious of the sunshine & the trees & the running waters ? to say nothing of the God of nature & providence. "Persuasion" (ah! You are cunning to bring "Persuasion" to me!) is the highest & most touching of her works ? and I agree with you gladly that it is perfect in its kind, & with touches of a higher impulse in it than we look generally to receive from her genius.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Mary Russell Mitford : Belford Regis

'The title is, The Neighbours ? just a title for Miss Austen you see! ? And for Miss Austen, you shall praise her as much as you please. She is delightful exquisite in her degree! ? only I wdnt have one of your dear hands "cut off" that you shd "write one page like her?s with the other", - because, really & earnestly, your Village and Belford Regis are more charming to me than her pages in congregation. She wants (admit it honestly, because you know she wants it) she wants a little touch of poetry. Her "neighbours" walk about & gossip, all unconscious of the sunshine & the trees & the running waters ? to say nothing of the God of nature & providence. "Persuasion" (ah! You are cunning to bring "Persuasion" to me!) is the highest & most touching of her works ? and I agree with you gladly that it is perfect in its kind, & with touches of a higher impulse in it than we look generally to receive from her genius.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : Diary and Letters of Madame d'Arblay

'Did you see ? what I am reading just too late (but we must be benighted sometimes) in the number before the last of the Edinburgh Review, a notice of Madme d?Arblay, very admirable in all ways, but chiefly interesting to you for the sake of the high estimate of your Miss Austen, who is called second to Shakespeare in the nice delineation of character.' [the review was in the January 1843 issue].

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Felicia Hemans : [poems]

'It is a long argument ? but I have been reading quite lately & for your sake & for the third time, her two best works ? Persuasion & Mansfield Park: & really my impressions do grow stronger & stronger in their old places. She is perfect after her kind ? true to the nature she SAW - & with a sufficient sense of the Beautiful, for grace. Like Mrs Hemans, she is too obviously a lady. I have put it in the shape of blame - & many might remark the same thing for praise: I mean however, that her ladyhood is always stronger in her than her humanity. Not that she is defective in strength as Mrs Hemans sometimes is ? she can "always do the thing she would" better than anybody else. Surely, surely I am not a niggard in my praise of Jane Austen! To call her a great writer & learned in the secrets, heights & depths of our nature, or a poet in anywise, is all that I refuse to call her ? and indeed I have not breath & articulation for such an opinion: & it astonishes me that you shd be so exorbitant my dearest Miss Mitford, in your claim for her!'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Barrett      Print: Book

  

Tobias Smollett : Humphry Clinker

November 19, 1880 [Paris] 'I have been reading with great interest Humphrey Clinker [sic], which I like much the best of Smollett's works. I read Peregrine Pickle some years ago on the Continent, and from what I remember of it, I consider it superior to Roderick Random, which I finished a week or two ago. As to Mr. Bramble, he takes me back into the last century, and is quite inimitable. I am now reading the Sentimental Journey, which I do not like so well.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Charlotte Schreiber      Print: Book

  

Tobias Smollett : Roderick Random

November 19, 1880 [Paris] 'I have been reading with great interest Humphrey Clinker [sic], which I like much the best of Smollett's works. I read Peregrine Pickle some years ago on the Continent, and from what I remember of it, I consider it superior to Roderick Random, which I finished a week or two ago. As to Mr. Bramble, he takes me back into the last century, and is quite inimitable. I am now reading the Sentimental Journey, which I do not like so well.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Charlotte Schreiber      Print: Book

  

Charles Lamb : [works]

'In my hours of leisure I read the works of Mr Charles Lamb, Mr Holcroft's memoirs, and the "Life of General Washington".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

Harriet Martineau : [works]

'From that time [summer 1840] to the present [1845] I have not read much. I have, however, looked through Lord Byron's works, the "Memoirs of Mr William Hutton", and Dr Stilling's Autobiography; with some of the works of Sir Walter Scott, Dr Southey, and Miss Martineau.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

John Campbell : The Universal History

?With this proposal I of course readily closed and accordingly the next day my father gave me the 1st vol of the "Universal History" (beginning with the life of Mohamed) and the 1st of Rapin?s "History of England", to begin with, an each of which in turn, I bestowed an hour in reading on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Friday mornings, allotting the other two mornings to a more amusing kind of reading such as Dryden?s "Virgil", "Telamachus", "Charles 12th". etc. I also began a translation of "Diable Boiteaux" & a prose one of Virgil?s "Eneid".?

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Marsh      Print: Book

  

Oliver Goldsmith : History of England from the earliest times to the death of George II

?The day after this being the last of the year, I managed to finish reading Blackstone?s Commentaries and Goldsmith?s History of England, both for the 2d time over & in the evening danced out the year at the Assembly.?

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Marsh      Print: Book

  

Hume : unknown

'I am glad you ha[ve] attacked Hume. Your remarks are just as far as I can determine'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John A. Carlyle      Print: Book

  

John Milton : [various]

'With my scanty pocket-money, high-priced books were beyond my reach; but I was lucky enough, when hunting, as was my want, among the second-hand bookstalls in Newcastle market-place, to light upon some off volumes of Milton?s prose works, which I bought for a few shillings. I read them all ? politics, theology, travels, with touches of autobiography- nothing came amiss to my voracious appetite. Over and over again did I read the Areopagitica, ?that sublime treatise? which, Macaulay tells us, ?every statesman should wear as a sign upon his hand and as frontlets between his eyes?.?

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Burt      Print: Book

  

Charlotte Smith : Celestina

'Tuesday the 4th being a very wet day we were obliged to keep pretty close to our miserably dull apartments the walls of w'ch were about a yard thick & the windows very small. We however at the library (consisting of about 400 volumes) got Mrs Smiths [sic] novel of "Celestina" & "Humphrey Clinker" to amuse us.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Marsh, Elizabeth Marsh and Miss White     Print: Book

  

Tobias Smollett : The expedition of Humphrey Clinker

'Tuesday the 4th being a very wet day we were obliged to keep pretty close to our miserably dull apartments the walls of w'ch were about a yard thick & the windows very small. We however at the library (consisting of about 400 volumes) got Mrs Smiths [sic] novel of "Celestina" & "Humphrey Clinker" to amuse us.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Marsh, Elizabeth Marsh and Miss White     Print: Book

  

Grahame : History of America

Fanny Kemble, 9 October 1832: 'I have begun Grahame's "History of America", and like it "mainly," as the old plays say'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Fanny Kemble      Print: Book

  

Dr Combe : Principles of Physiology

Fanny Kemble, journal letter to Harriet St. Leger, 27 June 1835, listing 'the books just now lying on my table, all of which I have been reading lately': 'Alfieri's "Life", by himself, a curious and interesting work; Washington Irving's last book, "A Tour on the Prairies", rather an ordinary book, upon a not ordinary subject, but not without sufficiently interesting matter in it too; Dr. Combe's "Principles of Physiology"; and a volume of Marlowe's plays, containing "Dr. Faustus". I have just finished Hayward's Translation of Goethe's "Faust", and wanted to see the old English treatment of the subject. I have read Marlowe's play with more curiosity than pleasure. This is, after all, but a small sample of what I read, but if you remember the complexion of my studies when I was a girl at Heath Farm and read Jeremy Taylor and Byron together, I can only say that they are still apt to be of the same heterogenous quality. But my brain is kept in a certain state of activity by them, and that, I suppose, is one of the desirable results of reading.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Fanny Kemble      Print: Book

  

Christopher Marlowe : Doctor Faustus

Fanny Kemble, journal letter to Harriet St. Leger, 27 June 1835, listing 'the books just now lying on my table, all of which I have been reading lately': 'Alfieri's "Life", by himself, a curious and interesting work; Washington Irving's last book, "A Tour on the Prairies", rather an ordinary book, upon a not ordinary subject, but not without sufficiently interesting matter in it too; Dr. Combe's "Principles of Physiology"; and a volume of Marlowe's plays, containing "Dr. Faustus". I have just finished Hayward's Translation of Goethe's "Faust", and wanted to see the old English treatment of the subject. I have read Marlowe's play with more curiosity than pleasure. This is, after all, but a small sample of what I read, but if you remember the complexion of my studies when I was a girl at Heath Farm and read Jeremy Taylor and Byron together, I can only say that they are still apt to be of the same heterogenous quality. But my brain is kept in a certain state of activity by them, and that, I suppose, is one of the desirable results of reading.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Fanny Kemble      Print: Book

  

Fanny Kemble : English Tragedy

Fanny Kemble to Harriet St. Leger, letter composed between 29 October-3 November 1838: 'I have just finished the play of which you read the beginning in England -- my "English Tragedy" [Kemble's third play]'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet St. Leger      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Carl Philipp Moritz : Travels of a German through England in 1782

'To amuse ourselves at the inns on this road we brought with us Jackson's "30 Letters" & Moritz's "Travels in England" (both in our Society) but having finish'd the latter (w'ch John was now reading) & Mrs M being reading the other, I got Mrs Radcliffe's novel of the "Sicilian Romance" from the Library there, which I this day began reading & was much pleased with.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Marsh      Print: Book

  

Carl Philipp Moritz : Travels of a German through England in 1782

'To amuse ourselves at the inns on this road we brought with us Jackson's "30 Letters" & Moritz's "Travels in England" (both in our Society) but having finish'd the latter (w'ch John was now reading) & Mrs M being reading the other, I got Mrs Radcliffe's novel of the "Sicilian Romance" from the Library there, which I this day began reading & was much pleased with.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Marsh      Print: Book

  

Richard Cumberland : Henry

'To amuse myself during this solitary journey I got Cumberland's "Henry" (then a new publication)... Wishing to reach Maidstone in good time on the follow'g day I ordered the chaise to be ready at 4 in the morning, at w'ch time I sat off & breakfasted at Uckfield the end of my 2d stage, by w'ch time I [had] become much interested in my travelling companion "Henry".'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Marsh      Print: Book

  

Charlotte Smith : The Young Philosopher

'Having finish'd my business in this neighbourhood, I on the next day (Friday the 24th) return'd to London in the coach, in w'ch being alone great part of the way I finished the novel of the "Young Philosopher" & in the evening began that of "Ned Evans" which I sat and read at the Bolt and Tunn, where I found the principal topic of conversation in the coffee room was Sheridan's new play of Pizarro, w'ch came out that evening at Drury Lane.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Marsh      Print: Book

  

Homer : Odyssey

?Milton?s miscellaneous works were still my favourites. I copied many of his poems into a writing book, and this I did, not only an account of the pleasure which I felt in their repetition, and in the appropriation ? so to speak ? of the ideas, but also as a means for improvement of my handwriting, which had continued to be very indifferent. The "Odyssey" and "Aeniad", which I also procured and read about this time, seemed tame and languid, whilst the stirring call of the old Iliadic battle trumpet was ringing in my ears, and vibrating within my heart. In short, I read or attentively conned [sic] over, every book I could buy or borrow, and as I retained a pretty clear idea of what I read, I became rather more than commonly proficient in book knowledge considering that I was only a better sort of porter in a warehouse.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Bamford      Print: Book

  

Harriet Martineau : Deerbrook

'I was reading to-day and I have since finished Miss Martineau's "Deerbrook", a capital novel though it is too full of preaching. It is inferior in execution to Miss Austen's novels in the development of common characters, but is suprior in the higher parts.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Crabb Robinson      Print: Book

  

John Moore : View of Society and Manners in France, Switzerland, and Germany: With Anecdotes Relating to Some Eminent Characters

'When we were speaking of Dr. Moore?s Travels, I told her that the Character of Mr. C.?reminded me of our friend Mr. Seward . . .'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Frances Burney      Print: Book

  

Elizabeth Hamilton : Memoirs of modern philosophers

'Having heard much of Miss Hamilton's celebrated novel of the "Modern Philosopher" we on Wed'y the 14th got it from Humphrey's Library w'ch Edw'd & I afterw'ds read out on even'gs [...] to Mrs M & were all much entertained with it.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Marsh family     Print: Book

  

Hannah More : Shepherd of Salisbury Plain

'at this time there was a great many tracks Come out and their Contents were Chiefly to perswade poor people to be satisfied in their situation and not to murmur at the dispensations of providence for we had not so much punishment as our sins deserved and in fact there was but little else to be heard from the pulpit or the press and those kind of books were often put into my hands in a dictatorial way in order to Convince me of my errors. for instance there was the Sheperd of Salsbury Plain ... the Farmers fireside and discontented Pendulum and many others which drove me almost into despair for I Could see their design.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Mayett      Print: Book, chapbooks

  

Hannah More : Farmer's fireside

'at this time there was a great many tracks Come out and their Contents were Chiefly to perswade poor people to be satisfied in their situation and not to murmur at the dispensations of providence for we had not so much punishment as our sins deserved and in fact there was but little else to be heard from the pulpit or the press and those kind of books were often put into my hands in a dictatorial way in order to Convince me of my errors. for instance there was the Sheperd of Salsbury Plain ... the Farmers fireside and discontented Pendulum and many others which drove me almost into despair for I Could see their design.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Mayett      Print: Book, chapbook

  

Hannah More : Discontented pendulum

'at this time there was a great many tracks Come out and their Contents were Chiefly to perswade poor people to be satisfied in their situation and not to murmur at the dispensations of providence for we had not so much punishment as our sins deserved and in fact there was but little else to be heard from the pulpit or the press and those kind of books were often put into my hands in a dictatorial way in order to convince me of my errors. for instance there was the Sheperd of Salsbury Plain ... the Farmers fireside and discontented Pendulum and many others which drove me almost into despair for I Could see their design.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Mayett      Print: Book, chapbook

  

Daphne du Maurier : unknown

[List of favourite things of 1945]: 'My favourite Books: The Keys of the Kingdom. The Good Companions Authors: Daphne du Maurier Poems: Squinency Wort. The Hound of Heaven Writers: Shaw. Galsworthy'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Francis Thompson : Hound of Heaven, The

[List of favourite things of 1945]: 'My favourite Books: The Keys of the Kingdom. The Good Companions Authors: Daphne du Maurier Poems: Squinency Wort. The Hound of Heaven Writers: Shaw. Galsworthy'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Ernest Hemingway : For Whom the Bell Tolls

[List of books read in 1945]: 'For Whom the Bell Tolls; Henry Brocken; Doctor Faustus; Life of the Bee; The Screwtape Letters; Modern Short Stories; Letters of People in Love; Men and Women; The Headmistress; The People's Government; The Art of Writing; Speech and Sound; Background to the Life of Christ; The House of Prayer; Eleanor in the Fifth; Adventures of Jig and Co; Rendezvous with Fear; Antony and Cleopatra; Hamlet; The Poetry of James Elroy Flecker; Escape; Hangman's Holiday; The Body Behind the Bar; Strong Poison; The Critic; Magic Lantern; Listening Valley; Emma; Dragon Seed; Crowthers of Bankdam; The Rat Trap; The Vortex; Fallen Angels; The Spanish House; O the Brave Music; The Light that Failed; Ghosts; The Antiquary; The Knightes Tale; Luria; The Best of Hazlitt; Pericles; The Rivals; Hamlet [again]; Antony and Cleopatra [again]; Knightes Tale [again]; Julius Caesar; Merchant of Venice; The Critic; The Rivals; Cymbeline; Adventures of a Young Soldier in Search of a Better World; The Nine Tailors; The Conquered; The Professor; Peter Abelard; Then They Pulled Down the Blind; The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club; Portrait of a Man with Red Hair; Winnie-the-Pooh; The House at Pooh Corner; Mrs Parkinson; Adele and Co; Frossia; Cluny Brown; Four Gardens; The World is Square; Being Met Together; Best Sporting Stories; Selected stories by Q; And Five were Foolish; Campaspe; Endimion [by Lyly]; Midas; Dr Faustus; Twelfth Night; Mrs Warrent's Proffession [sic]; The Spanish Tragedy; The Jew of Malta; Galathea; Tambourlaine; Sun is my Undoing; By Greta Bridge; Utopia; England, their England; The Art of Poetry; Old Wives Tale; The Reader is Warned; Long, Long Ago; Friar Bacon & Friar Bungay; James IV of Scotland; The Handsome Langleys; The Dog Beneath the Skin; Death Comes for the Archbishop; The Island of Youth; I'll Say She Does; The Forsyte Saga; In Youth is Pleasure; On Forsyte Change; Genesis to Nehemiah.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Christopher Marlowe : Dr Faustus

[List of books read in 1945]: 'For Whom the Bell Tolls; Henry Brocken; Doctor Faustus; Life of the Bee; The Screwtape Letters; Modern Short Stories; Letters of People in Love; Men and Women; The Headmistress; The People's Government; The Art of Writing; Speech and Sound; Background to the Life of Christ; The House of Prayer; Eleanor in the Fifth; Adventures of Jig and Co; Rendezvous with Fear; Antony and Cleopatra; Hamlet; The Poetry of James Elroy Flecker; Escape; Hangman's Holiday; The Body Behind the Bar; Strong Poison; The Critic; Magic Lantern; Listening Valley; Emma; Dragon Seed; Crowthers of Bankdam; The Rat Trap; The Vortex; Fallen Angels; The Spanish House; O the Brave Music; The Light that Failed; Ghosts; The Antiquary; The Knightes Tale; Luria; The Best of Hazlitt; Pericles; The Rivals; Hamlet [again]; Antony and Cleopatra [again]; Knightes Tale [again]; Julius Caesar; Merchant of Venice; The Critic; The Rivals; Cymbeline; Adventures of a Young Soldier in Search of a Better World; The Nine Tailors; The Conquered; The Professor; Peter Abelard; Then They Pulled Down the Blind; The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club; Portrait of a Man with Red Hair; Winnie-the-Pooh; The House at Pooh Corner; Mrs Parkinson; Adele and Co; Frossia; Cluny Brown; Four Gardens; The World is Square; Being Met Together; Best Sporting Stories; Selected stories by Q; And Five were Foolish; Campaspe; Endimion [by Lyly]; Midas; Dr Faustus [again]; Twelfth Night; Mrs Warrent's Proffession [sic]; The Spanish Tragedy; The Jew of Malta; Galathea; Tambourlaine; Sun is my Undoing; By Greta Bridge; Utopia; England, their England; The Art of Poetry; Old Wives Tale; The Reader is Warned; Long, Long Ago; Friar Bacon & Friar Bungay; James IV of Scotland; The Handsome Langleys; The Dog Beneath the Skin; Death Comes for the Archbishop; The Island of Youth; I'll Say She Does; The Forsyte Saga; In Youth is Pleasure; On Forsyte Change; Genesis to Nehemiah.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

J. Patterson Milne : Adventures of Jig and Co

[List of books read in 1945]: 'For Whom the Bell Tolls; Henry Brocken; Doctor Faustus; Life of the Bee; The Screwtape Letters; Modern Short Stories; Letters of People in Love; Men and Women; The Headmistress; The People's Government; The Art of Writing; Speech and Sound; Background to the Life of Christ; The House of Prayer; Eleanor in the Fifth; Adventures of Jig and Co; Rendezvous with Fear; Antony and Cleopatra; Hamlet; The Poetry of James Elroy Flecker; Escape; Hangman's Holiday; The Body Behind the Bar; Strong Poison; The Critic; Magic Lantern; Listening Valley; Emma; Dragon Seed; Crowthers of Bankdam; The Rat Trap; The Vortex; Fallen Angels; The Spanish House; O the Brave Music; The Light that Failed; Ghosts; The Antiquary; The Knightes Tale; Luria; The Best of Hazlitt; Pericles; The Rivals; Hamlet [again]; Antony and Cleopatra [again]; Knightes Tale [again]; Julius Caesar; Merchant of Venice; The Critic; The Rivals; Cymbeline; Adventures of a Young Soldier in Search of a Better World; The Nine Tailors; The Conquered; The Professor; Peter Abelard; Then They Pulled Down the Blind; The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club; Portrait of a Man with Red Hair; Winnie-the-Pooh; The House at Pooh Corner; Mrs Parkinson; Adele and Co; Frossia; Cluny Brown; Four Gardens; The World is Square; Being Met Together; Best Sporting Stories; Selected stories by Q; And Five were Foolish; Campaspe; Endimion [by Lyly]; Midas; Dr Faustus [again]; Twelfth Night; Mrs Warrent's Proffession [sic]; The Spanish Tragedy; The Jew of Malta; Galathea; Tambourlaine; Sun is my Undoing; By Greta Bridge; Utopia; England, their England; The Art of Poetry; Old Wives Tale; The Reader is Warned; Long, Long Ago; Friar Bacon & Friar Bungay; James IV of Scotland; The Handsome Langleys; The Dog Beneath the Skin; Death Comes for the Archbishop; The Island of Youth; I'll Say She Does; The Forsyte Saga; In Youth is Pleasure; On Forsyte Change; Genesis to Nehemiah.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Lady Eleanor Smith : Magic Lantern

[List of books read in 1945]: 'For Whom the Bell Tolls; Henry Brocken; Doctor Faustus; Life of the Bee; The Screwtape Letters; Modern Short Stories; Letters of People in Love; Men and Women; The Headmistress; The People's Government; The Art of Writing; Speech and Sound; Background to the Life of Christ; The House of Prayer; Eleanor in the Fifth; Adventures of Jig and Co; Rendezvous with Fear; Antony and Cleopatra; Hamlet; The Poetry of James Elroy Flecker; Escape; Hangman's Holiday; The Body Behind the Bar; Strong Poison; The Critic; Magic Lantern; Listening Valley; Emma; Dragon Seed; Crowthers of Bankdam; The Rat Trap; The Vortex; Fallen Angels; The Spanish House; O the Brave Music; The Light that Failed; Ghosts; The Antiquary; The Knightes Tale; Luria; The Best of Hazlitt; Pericles; The Rivals; Hamlet [again]; Antony and Cleopatra [again]; Knightes Tale [again]; Julius Caesar; Merchant of Venice; The Critic; The Rivals; Cymbeline; Adventures of a Young Soldier in Search of a Better World; The Nine Tailors; The Conquered; The Professor; Peter Abelard; Then They Pulled Down the Blind; The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club; Portrait of a Man with Red Hair; Winnie-the-Pooh; The House at Pooh Corner; Mrs Parkinson; Adele and Co; Frossia; Cluny Brown; Four Gardens; The World is Square; Being Met Together; Best Sporting Stories; Selected stories by Q; And Five were Foolish; Campaspe; Endimion [by Lyly]; Midas; Dr Faustus [again]; Twelfth Night; Mrs Warrent's Proffession [sic]; The Spanish Tragedy; The Jew of Malta; Galathea; Tambourlaine; Sun is my Undoing; By Greta Bridge; Utopia; England, their England; The Art of Poetry; Old Wives Tale; The Reader is Warned; Long, Long Ago; Friar Bacon & Friar Bungay; James IV of Scotland; The Handsome Langleys; The Dog Beneath the Skin; Death Comes for the Archbishop; The Island of Youth; I'll Say She Does; The Forsyte Saga; In Youth is Pleasure; On Forsyte Change; Genesis to Nehemiah.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Lady Eleanor Smith : Spanish House, The

[List of books read in 1945]: 'For Whom the Bell Tolls; Henry Brocken; Doctor Faustus; Life of the Bee; The Screwtape Letters; Modern Short Stories; Letters of People in Love; Men and Women; The Headmistress; The People's Government; The Art of Writing; Speech and Sound; Background to the Life of Christ; The House of Prayer; Eleanor in the Fifth; Adventures of Jig and Co; Rendezvous with Fear; Antony and Cleopatra; Hamlet; The Poetry of James Elroy Flecker; Escape; Hangman's Holiday; The Body Behind the Bar; Strong Poison; The Critic; Magic Lantern; Listening Valley; Emma; Dragon Seed; Crowthers of Bankdam; The Rat Trap; The Vortex; Fallen Angels; The Spanish House; O the Brave Music; The Light that Failed; Ghosts; The Antiquary; The Knightes Tale; Luria; The Best of Hazlitt; Pericles; The Rivals; Hamlet [again]; Antony and Cleopatra [again]; Knightes Tale [again]; Julius Caesar; Merchant of Venice; The Critic; The Rivals; Cymbeline; Adventures of a Young Soldier in Search of a Better World; The Nine Tailors; The Conquered; The Professor; Peter Abelard; Then They Pulled Down the Blind; The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club; Portrait of a Man with Red Hair; Winnie-the-Pooh; The House at Pooh Corner; Mrs Parkinson; Adele and Co; Frossia; Cluny Brown; Four Gardens; The World is Square; Being Met Together; Best Sporting Stories; Selected stories by Q; And Five were Foolish; Campaspe; Endimion [by Lyly]; Midas; Dr Faustus [again]; Twelfth Night; Mrs Warrent's Proffession [sic]; The Spanish Tragedy; The Jew of Malta; Galathea; Tambourlaine; Sun is my Undoing; By Greta Bridge; Utopia; England, their England; The Art of Poetry; Old Wives Tale; The Reader is Warned; Long, Long Ago; Friar Bacon & Friar Bungay; James IV of Scotland; The Handsome Langleys; The Dog Beneath the Skin; Death Comes for the Archbishop; The Island of Youth; I'll Say She Does; The Forsyte Saga; In Youth is Pleasure; On Forsyte Change; Genesis to Nehemiah.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

D.A. Smith : O the Brave Music

[List of books read in 1945]: 'For Whom the Bell Tolls; Henry Brocken; Doctor Faustus; Life of the Bee; The Screwtape Letters; Modern Short Stories; Letters of People in Love; Men and Women; The Headmistress; The People's Government; The Art of Writing; Speech and Sound; Background to the Life of Christ; The House of Prayer; Eleanor in the Fifth; Adventures of Jig and Co; Rendezvous with Fear; Antony and Cleopatra; Hamlet; The Poetry of James Elroy Flecker; Escape; Hangman's Holiday; The Body Behind the Bar; Strong Poison; The Critic; Magic Lantern; Listening Valley; Emma; Dragon Seed; Crowthers of Bankdam; The Rat Trap; The Vortex; Fallen Angels; The Spanish House; O the Brave Music; The Light that Failed; Ghosts; The Antiquary; The Knightes Tale; Luria; The Best of Hazlitt; Pericles; The Rivals; Hamlet [again]; Antony and Cleopatra [again]; Knightes Tale [again]; Julius Caesar; Merchant of Venice; The Critic; The Rivals; Cymbeline; Adventures of a Young Soldier in Search of a Better World; The Nine Tailors; The Conquered; The Professor; Peter Abelard; Then They Pulled Down the Blind; The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club; Portrait of a Man with Red Hair; Winnie-the-Pooh; The House at Pooh Corner; Mrs Parkinson; Adele and Co; Frossia; Cluny Brown; Four Gardens; The World is Square; Being Met Together; Best Sporting Stories; Selected stories by Q; And Five were Foolish; Campaspe; Endimion [by Lyly]; Midas; Dr Faustus [again]; Twelfth Night; Mrs Warrent's Proffession [sic]; The Spanish Tragedy; The Jew of Malta; Galathea; Tambourlaine; Sun is my Undoing; By Greta Bridge; Utopia; England, their England; The Art of Poetry; Old Wives Tale; The Reader is Warned; Long, Long Ago; Friar Bacon & Friar Bungay; James IV of Scotland; The Handsome Langleys; The Dog Beneath the Skin; Death Comes for the Archbishop; The Island of Youth; I'll Say She Does; The Forsyte Saga; In Youth is Pleasure; On Forsyte Change; Genesis to Nehemiah.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

A.A. Milne : Winne-the-Pooh

[List of books read in 1945]: 'For Whom the Bell Tolls; Henry Brocken; Doctor Faustus; Life of the Bee; The Screwtape Letters; Modern Short Stories; Letters of People in Love; Men and Women; The Headmistress; The People's Government; The Art of Writing; Speech and Sound; Background to the Life of Christ; The House of Prayer; Eleanor in the Fifth; Adventures of Jig and Co; Rendezvous with Fear; Antony and Cleopatra; Hamlet; The Poetry of James Elroy Flecker; Escape; Hangman's Holiday; The Body Behind the Bar; Strong Poison; The Critic; Magic Lantern; Listening Valley; Emma; Dragon Seed; Crowthers of Bankdam; The Rat Trap; The Vortex; Fallen Angels; The Spanish House; O the Brave Music; The Light that Failed; Ghosts; The Antiquary; The Knightes Tale; Luria; The Best of Hazlitt; Pericles; The Rivals; Hamlet [again]; Antony and Cleopatra [again]; Knightes Tale [again]; Julius Caesar; Merchant of Venice; The Critic; The Rivals; Cymbeline; Adventures of a Young Soldier in Search of a Better World; The Nine Tailors; The Conquered; The Professor; Peter Abelard; Then They Pulled Down the Blind; The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club; Portrait of a Man with Red Hair; Winnie-the-Pooh; The House at Pooh Corner; Mrs Parkinson; Adele and Co; Frossia; Cluny Brown; Four Gardens; The World is Square; Being Met Together; Best Sporting Stories; Selected stories by Q; And Five were Foolish; Campaspe; Endimion [by Lyly]; Midas; Dr Faustus [again]; Twelfth Night; Mrs Warrent's Proffession [sic]; The Spanish Tragedy; The Jew of Malta; Galathea; Tambourlaine; Sun is my Undoing; By Greta Bridge; Utopia; England, their England; The Art of Poetry; Old Wives Tale; The Reader is Warned; Long, Long Ago; Friar Bacon & Friar Bungay; James IV of Scotland; The Handsome Langleys; The Dog Beneath the Skin; Death Comes for the Archbishop; The Island of Youth; I'll Say She Does; The Forsyte Saga; In Youth is Pleasure; On Forsyte Change; Genesis to Nehemiah.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

A.A. Milne : House at Pooh Corner, The

[List of books read in 1945]: 'For Whom the Bell Tolls; Henry Brocken; Doctor Faustus; Life of the Bee; The Screwtape Letters; Modern Short Stories; Letters of People in Love; Men and Women; The Headmistress; The People's Government; The Art of Writing; Speech and Sound; Background to the Life of Christ; The House of Prayer; Eleanor in the Fifth; Adventures of Jig and Co; Rendezvous with Fear; Antony and Cleopatra; Hamlet; The Poetry of James Elroy Flecker; Escape; Hangman's Holiday; The Body Behind the Bar; Strong Poison; The Critic; Magic Lantern; Listening Valley; Emma; Dragon Seed; Crowthers of Bankdam; The Rat Trap; The Vortex; Fallen Angels; The Spanish House; O the Brave Music; The Light that Failed; Ghosts; The Antiquary; The Knightes Tale; Luria; The Best of Hazlitt; Pericles; The Rivals; Hamlet [again]; Antony and Cleopatra [again]; Knightes Tale [again]; Julius Caesar; Merchant of Venice; The Critic; The Rivals; Cymbeline; Adventures of a Young Soldier in Search of a Better World; The Nine Tailors; The Conquered; The Professor; Peter Abelard; Then They Pulled Down the Blind; The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club; Portrait of a Man with Red Hair; Winnie-the-Pooh; The House at Pooh Corner; Mrs Parkinson; Adele and Co; Frossia; Cluny Brown; Four Gardens; The World is Square; Being Met Together; Best Sporting Stories; Selected stories by Q; And Five were Foolish; Campaspe; Endimion [by Lyly]; Midas; Dr Faustus [again]; Twelfth Night; Mrs Warrent's Proffession [sic]; The Spanish Tragedy; The Jew of Malta; Galathea; Tambourlaine; Sun is my Undoing; By Greta Bridge; Utopia; England, their England; The Art of Poetry; Old Wives Tale; The Reader is Warned; Long, Long Ago; Friar Bacon & Friar Bungay; James IV of Scotland; The Handsome Langleys; The Dog Beneath the Skin; Death Comes for the Archbishop; The Island of Youth; I'll Say She Does; The Forsyte Saga; In Youth is Pleasure; On Forsyte Change; Genesis to Nehemiah.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Louis Bromfield : Mrs Parkinson

[List of books read in 1945]: 'For Whom the Bell Tolls; Henry Brocken; Doctor Faustus; Life of the Bee; The Screwtape Letters; Modern Short Stories; Letters of People in Love; Men and Women; The Headmistress; The People's Government; The Art of Writing; Speech and Sound; Background to the Life of Christ; The House of Prayer; Eleanor in the Fifth; Adventures of Jig and Co; Rendezvous with Fear; Antony and Cleopatra; Hamlet; The Poetry of James Elroy Flecker; Escape; Hangman's Holiday; The Body Behind the Bar; Strong Poison; The Critic; Magic Lantern; Listening Valley; Emma; Dragon Seed; Crowthers of Bankdam; The Rat Trap; The Vortex; Fallen Angels; The Spanish House; O the Brave Music; The Light that Failed; Ghosts; The Antiquary; The Knightes Tale; Luria; The Best of Hazlitt; Pericles; The Rivals; Hamlet [again]; Antony and Cleopatra [again]; Knightes Tale [again]; Julius Caesar; Merchant of Venice; The Critic; The Rivals; Cymbeline; Adventures of a Young Soldier in Search of a Better World; The Nine Tailors; The Conquered; The Professor; Peter Abelard; Then They Pulled Down the Blind; The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club; Portrait of a Man with Red Hair; Winnie-the-Pooh; The House at Pooh Corner; Mrs Parkinson; Adele and Co; Frossia; Cluny Brown; Four Gardens; The World is Square; Being Met Together; Best Sporting Stories; Selected stories by Q; And Five were Foolish; Campaspe; Endimion [by Lyly]; Midas; Dr Faustus [again]; Twelfth Night; Mrs Warrent's Proffession [sic]; The Spanish Tragedy; The Jew of Malta; Galathea; Tambourlaine; Sun is my Undoing; By Greta Bridge; Utopia; England, their England; The Art of Poetry; Old Wives Tale; The Reader is Warned; Long, Long Ago; Friar Bacon & Friar Bungay; James IV of Scotland; The Handsome Langleys; The Dog Beneath the Skin; Death Comes for the Archbishop; The Island of Youth; I'll Say She Does; The Forsyte Saga; In Youth is Pleasure; On Forsyte Change; Genesis to Nehemiah.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

E.M. Almedingen : Frossia

[List of books read in 1945]: 'For Whom the Bell Tolls; Henry Brocken; Doctor Faustus; Life of the Bee; The Screwtape Letters; Modern Short Stories; Letters of People in Love; Men and Women; The Headmistress; The People's Government; The Art of Writing; Speech and Sound; Background to the Life of Christ; The House of Prayer; Eleanor in the Fifth; Adventures of Jig and Co; Rendezvous with Fear; Antony and Cleopatra; Hamlet; The Poetry of James Elroy Flecker; Escape; Hangman's Holiday; The Body Behind the Bar; Strong Poison; The Critic; Magic Lantern; Listening Valley; Emma; Dragon Seed; Crowthers of Bankdam; The Rat Trap; The Vortex; Fallen Angels; The Spanish House; O the Brave Music; The Light that Failed; Ghosts; The Antiquary; The Knightes Tale; Luria; The Best of Hazlitt; Pericles; The Rivals; Hamlet [again]; Antony and Cleopatra [again]; Knightes Tale [again]; Julius Caesar; Merchant of Venice; The Critic; The Rivals; Cymbeline; Adventures of a Young Soldier in Search of a Better World; The Nine Tailors; The Conquered; The Professor; Peter Abelard; Then They Pulled Down the Blind; The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club; Portrait of a Man with Red Hair; Winnie-the-Pooh; The House at Pooh Corner; Mrs Parkinson; Adele and Co; Frossia; Cluny Brown; Four Gardens; The World is Square; Being Met Together; Best Sporting Stories; Selected stories by Q; And Five were Foolish; Campaspe; Endimion [by Lyly]; Midas; Dr Faustus [again]; Twelfth Night; Mrs Warrent's Proffession [sic]; The Spanish Tragedy; The Jew of Malta; Galathea; Tambourlaine; Sun is my Undoing; By Greta Bridge; Utopia; England, their England; The Art of Poetry; Old Wives Tale; The Reader is Warned; Long, Long Ago; Friar Bacon & Friar Bungay; James IV of Scotland; The Handsome Langleys; The Dog Beneath the Skin; Death Comes for the Archbishop; The Island of Youth; I'll Say She Does; The Forsyte Saga; In Youth is Pleasure; On Forsyte Change; Genesis to Nehemiah.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Christopher Marlowe : Tambourlaine

[List of books read in 1945]: 'For Whom the Bell Tolls; Henry Brocken; Doctor Faustus; Life of the Bee; The Screwtape Letters; Modern Short Stories; Letters of People in Love; Men and Women; The Headmistress; The People's Government; The Art of Writing; Speech and Sound; Background to the Life of Christ; The House of Prayer; Eleanor in the Fifth; Adventures of Jig and Co; Rendezvous with Fear; Antony and Cleopatra; Hamlet; The Poetry of James Elroy Flecker; Escape; Hangman's Holiday; The Body Behind the Bar; Strong Poison; The Critic; Magic Lantern; Listening Valley; Emma; Dragon Seed; Crowthers of Bankdam; The Rat Trap; The Vortex; Fallen Angels; The Spanish House; O the Brave Music; The Light that Failed; Ghosts; The Antiquary; The Knightes Tale; Luria; The Best of Hazlitt; Pericles; The Rivals; Hamlet [again]; Antony and Cleopatra [again]; Knightes Tale [again]; Julius Caesar; Merchant of Venice; The Critic; The Rivals; Cymbeline; Adventures of a Young Soldier in Search of a Better World; The Nine Tailors; The Conquered; The Professor; Peter Abelard; Then They Pulled Down the Blind; The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club; Portrait of a Man with Red Hair; Winnie-the-Pooh; The House at Pooh Corner; Mrs Parkinson; Adele and Co; Frossia; Cluny Brown; Four Gardens; The World is Square; Being Met Together; Best Sporting Stories; Selected stories by Q; And Five were Foolish; Campaspe; Endimion [by Lyly]; Midas; Dr Faustus [again]; Twelfth Night; Mrs Warrent's Proffession [sic]; The Spanish Tragedy; The Jew of Malta; Galathea; Tambourlaine; Sun is my Undoing; By Greta Bridge; Utopia; England, their England; The Art of Poetry; Old Wives Tale; The Reader is Warned; Long, Long Ago; Friar Bacon & Friar Bungay; James IV of Scotland; The Handsome Langleys; The Dog Beneath the Skin; Death Comes for the Archbishop; The Island of Youth; I'll Say She Does; The Forsyte Saga; In Youth is Pleasure; On Forsyte Change; Genesis to Nehemiah.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

Nehemiah : Book of Nehemiah

[List of books read in 1945]: 'For Whom the Bell Tolls; Henry Brocken; Doctor Faustus; Life of the Bee; The Screwtape Letters; Modern Short Stories; Letters of People in Love; Men and Women; The Headmistress; The People's Government; The Art of Writing; Speech and Sound; Background to the Life of Christ; The House of Prayer; Eleanor in the Fifth; Adventures of Jig and Co; Rendezvous with Fear; Antony and Cleopatra; Hamlet; The Poetry of James Elroy Flecker; Escape; Hangman's Holiday; The Body Behind the Bar; Strong Poison; The Critic; Magic Lantern; Listening Valley; Emma; Dragon Seed; Crowthers of Bankdam; The Rat Trap; The Vortex; Fallen Angels; The Spanish House; O the Brave Music; The Light that Failed; Ghosts; The Antiquary; The Knightes Tale; Luria; The Best of Hazlitt; Pericles; The Rivals; Hamlet [again]; Antony and Cleopatra [again]; Knightes Tale [again]; Julius Caesar; Merchant of Venice; The Critic; The Rivals; Cymbeline; Adventures of a Young Soldier in Search of a Better World; The Nine Tailors; The Conquered; The Professor; Peter Abelard; Then They Pulled Down the Blind; The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club; Portrait of a Man with Red Hair; Winnie-the-Pooh; The House at Pooh Corner; Mrs Parkinson; Adele and Co; Frossia; Cluny Brown; Four Gardens; The World is Square; Being Met Together; Best Sporting Stories; Selected stories by Q; And Five were Foolish; Campaspe; Endimion [by Lyly]; Midas; Dr Faustus [again]; Twelfth Night; Mrs Warrent's Proffession [sic]; The Spanish Tragedy; The Jew of Malta; Galathea; Tambourlaine; Sun is my Undoing; By Greta Bridge; Utopia; England, their England; The Art of Poetry; Old Wives Tale; The Reader is Warned; Long, Long Ago; Friar Bacon & Friar Bungay; James IV of Scotland; The Handsome Langleys; The Dog Beneath the Skin; Death Comes for the Archbishop; The Island of Youth; I'll Say She Does; The Forsyte Saga; In Youth is Pleasure; On Forsyte Change; Genesis to Nehemiah.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hilary Spalding      Print: Book

  

John Milton : [various titles]

'For three years I continued a regular subscriber to the circulating library, during which time I read various works, including Milton's, Shakespeare's, Sterne's, Dr Johnson's, and many others. It was a usual practice for me to sit up to read after the family had retired for the night. I remember it was on one of these occasions that I read Lewis's "Monk". On rising from my seat to go to bed, I was so impressed with dongeon horror, that I took the candle and ? up stairs, not daring to look either right or left, lest some Lady Angela should plunge a dagger into me!'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Christopher Thomson      Print: Book

  

Samuel Smiles : [biographies of men]

'As an apprentice I was a subscriber to the Mechanic's Library, from which I borrowed a great supply of books - my tastes lying largely in the direction of biography ... series of books of Mr Smiles, is still worth the attention of young men in search of wholesome reading.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: James Glass Bertram      Print: Book

  

John Milton : 

'the diverse collection of literature that Christopher Thomson, a sometime shipwright, actor and housepainter, worked his way through [...] included adventure stories such as "Robinson Crusoe" and the imitative "Philip Quarll", books of travel, such as Boyle's "Travels", some un-named religious tracts, a number of "classics" including Milton and Shakespeare, some radical newspapers, particularly Cobbett's "Register" and Wooller's "Black Dwarf", mechanics' magazines, and some occasional items of contemporary literature, including the novels of Scott and the poetry of Byron.'

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Christopher Thomson      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

'Charles Shaw's dependance upon a small Sunday school library in Tunstall [...] imparted a magnificent if involuntary scope to his education: '"I read "Robinson Crusoe" and a few other favourite boys' books [...] After these the most readable I could find was Rollin's "Ancient History". His narratives opened a new world [...] [which] I regarded as remote from Tunstall and England as those other worlds I read of in Dick's "Christian Philosopher," which book I found in the library too ... Then I read Milton's "Paradise Lost", Klopstock's "Messiah", and later on, Pollock's "Course of Time", and Gilfillan's "Bards of the Bible".These books may look a strange assortment for a boy of fourteen or fifteen to read, but [...] they just happened to fall into my hands"'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Shaw      Print: Book

  

Robert Chambers : Chambers's Journal

'One Saturday afternoon in the summer of 1838, whilst crossing Brumsfield links on my way home to Morningside, endeavouring as I walked over the grass to read a story in one of the volumes of "Chambers's Journal", then of a somewhat unwielding size, I was stopped by two gentlemen, one of whom asked what I was reading...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: James Glass Bertram      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Walkingham : arithmetic textbook

David Vincent notes how the nineteenth-century handloom weaver Wiliam Farish '"with Walkingham's arithmetic, and a slate and pencil at my side ... used to con over the problems as I worked the treadles"'.

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: William Farish      Print: Book

  

Chevalier Ramsay : Life of Cyrus

James Burn, on his first contact with literature after years of having seen none: '"In the latter end of the year of 1826, a friend made me a present of an old edition of Chevalier Ramsay's "Life of Cyrus". This little volume opened up to my enquiring mind a rich field of useful knowledge. The apendix to the work contained the [italics]heathen mythology[end italics]: this part of the work completely fascinated me, and for a considerable time became my constant companion."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: James Dawson Burn      Print: Book

  

James Thomson : The Seasons

'Thomas Carter [a nineteenth-century Colchester and London tailor] wrote of "The Seasons" that, "With the exception of the Bible, I know not that I ever read any other book so attentively and regularly. Its beautiful descriptions of nature were delightful to my imagination, while its fine moral reflections [...] were, as I believe, greatly instrumental in promoting my best interests"'.

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

Lindley Murray : Grammar

'When William Lovett arrived in London [from Newlyn, in the 1820s] he possessed a Cornish accent but no useful knowledge, and immediately set about remedying these twin defects with the aid of "Lindley Murray's Grammar".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Lovett      Print: Book

  

Henri Marc-Bonnet : "Histoire des Ordres Religieux"

'Finished reading the four last volumes of the "Histoire des Ordres Religieux". Began "La Beata", a story of Florentine life by T.A. Trollope. I am also reading Sachetti's Novelle, and Sismondi's History of the Italian Republics'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: Book

  

Jean Charles L?onard de Sismondi : History of the Italian Republics

'Finished reading the four last volumes of the "Histoire des Ordres Religieux". Began "La Beata", a story of Florentine life by T.A. Trollope. I am also reading Sachetti's Novelle, and Sismondi's History of the Italian Republics'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: Book

  

W.G. Tenneman : Manual of the History of Philosophy

'Desultory morning, from feebleness of head. Osservatore Fiorentino and Tenneman's Manual of Philosophy'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: Book

  

Charles Montalambert : The Monks of the West

'Read, in the Athenaeum, an interesting article on Bishop Colenso's (of Natal), Letter to the Archbishop of Canterbury on the toleration of Polygamy in converts to Christianity. In the evening read the "Monks of the West".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: Book

  

Auguste Comte : [on the Middle Ages]

'Read Comte on the Middle Ages'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

Henry Hallam : [perhaps The View of the State of Europe during the Middle Ages]

'Read Hallam on the study of Roman law in the Middle Ages'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

Burlamacchi : Life of Savonarola

'Read again Burlamacchi's Life of Savonarola'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot      Print: Book

  

Anna Jameson : Sacred and Legendary Art

'Read Mrs Jameson's "Legendary Art".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: Book

  

Marullus : unknown

'began Marullus. In the evening read Pettigrew on Medical Superstitions.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: Book

  

Manni : [Life of Burchiello]

'Read... Manni's Life of Burchiello, copying extracts'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: Book

  

Anna Jameson : Sacred and Legendary Art

'copied out the Lives of some saints from Mrs Jameson'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: Book

  

Anna Jameson : Legends Of The Monastic Orders As Represented In The Fine Arts

'During our stay [in Malvern] I read Mrs Jameson's book on the Legends of the Monastic orders... and began Marchese's Storia di San Marco'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: Book

  

Marchese : Storia di San Marco

'During our stay [in Malvern] I read Mrs Jameson's book on the Legends of the Monastic orders... and began Marchese's Storia di San Marco'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: Book

  

Niccolo Machiavelli : The Prince (probably)

'Looked through Machiavelli's works'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: Book

  

Ludovico Antonio Muratori : unknown

'Read Villari, making chronological notes. Then Muratori on Proper Names'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: Book

  

Amans-Alexis Monteil : [presumably one of his works on history of French civilisation]

'In the evening read Monteil - a marvellous book: crammed with erudition, yet not dull or tiresome'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

Manni : Veglie Piacevole

'This week I have read a satire of Juvenal, some of Cicero's "De Officiis", part of Epictetus' Enchiridion, two cantos of Pulci, part of the Canti Carnascialeschi, and finished Manni's Veglie Piacevole, besides looking up various things in the classical antquities and peeping into Theocritus'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

Goldwin Smith : [answer to Mansel]

'In the evening read Goldwin Smith's answer to Mansel'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

Scipioni Ammirato : Famiglie Nobili Fiorentini

'Went to the British Museum. Found some details in Ammirato's Famiglie Nobili Fiorentini... In the evening I read Muratori on the Confraternita'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

Ludovico Antonio Muratori : [unknown, on the Confraternita]

'Went to the British Museum. Found some details in Ammirato's "Famiglie Nobili Fiorentini"... In the evening I read Muratori on the Confraternita'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

Conyers Middleton : Dr. Middleton's Letter From Rome, Showing an Exact Conformity Between Popery and Paganism

'Read through Middleton's Letter from Rome'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

Malmantile : [unknown]

'Read the Malmantile'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

Emile Du Bois Reymond : [book on Johannes Mueler]

'Read passage from Du Bois Reymond's book on Johannes Mueller, a propos of visions. Finished Libro 1 of Machiavelli's Istorie. Read "Blackwood"'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

Niccolo Machiavelli : Istorie fiorentine

'Read passage from Du Bois Reymond's book on Johannes Mueller, a propos of visions. Finished Libro 1 of Machiavelli's Istorie. Read "Blackwood"'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

Charlotte Mew : 'The Changeling'

'Charlotte [Mew] used to read [...] [lines from her 1912 poem "The Changeling", in which a child speaker ponders reasons for its own existence] aloud [...] to children of her acquaintance, giving no explanation, because she believed [...] that none would be needed. They understood her at once.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Charlotte Mew      Print: Unknown

  

Coventry Patmore : 

'As to what they read [at the Gower Street School in the 1880s] -- and [...] Lucy Harrison [headmistress] read aloud to them untiringly -- it must be what went deepest and lifted highest -- Shakespeare, Dante in Cary's translation, Blake, Wordsworth, and [...] [Miss Harrison's] own favourites, Emily Bronte, Christina Rossetti, the Brownings, Coventry Patmore [...] A reading which all [...] [Miss Harrison's] pupils heard often, and never forgot, was from Alice Meynell's "Preludes" of 1875 -- the sonnet "To a Daisy"'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Lucy Harrison, headmistress, Charlotte Mew, and other pupils at Gower Street school     Print: Book

  

Alice Meynell : Preludes

'As to what they read [at the Gower Street School in the 1880s] -- and [...] Lucy Harrison [headmistress] read aloud to them untiringly -- it must be what went deepest and lifted highest -- Shakespeare, Dante in Cary's translation, Blake, Wordsworth, and [...] [Miss Harrison's] own favourites, Emily Bronte, Christina Rossetti, the Brownings, Coventry Patmore [...] A reading which all [...] [Miss Harrison's] pupils heard often, and never forgot, was from Alice Meynell's "Preludes" of 1875 -- the sonnet "To a Daisy"'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Lucy Harrison, headmistress, Charlotte Mew, and other pupils at Gower Street school     Print: Book

  

Alice Meynell : "To A Daisy"

'As to what they read [at the Gower Street School in the 1880s] -- and [...] Lucy Harrison [headmistress] read aloud to them untiringly -- it must be what went deepest and lifted highest -- Shakespeare, Dante in Cary's translation, Blake, Wordsworth, and [...] [Miss Harrison's] own favourites, Emily Bronte, Christina Rossetti, the Brownings, Coventry Patmore [...] A reading which all [...] [Miss Harrison's] pupils heard often, and never forgot, was from Alice Meynell's "Preludes" of 1875 -- the sonnet "To a Daisy"'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Lucy Harrison, headmistress, Charlotte Mew, and other pupils at Gower Street school     Print: Book

  

Charlotte Mew : "Requiescat"

Charlotte Mew to Mrs Catherine Dawson Scott, 12 May 1914: '"Looking through some of Ella [D'Arcy]'s old letters [...] I find she wrote to me 3 about the Requiescat ... she had seen it in "The Nation"and wrote [...] Thanking me for sending it to her [...] and adding "it goes into my private anthology".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Ella D'Arcy      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Charlotte Mew : "The Farmer's Bride"

'In the early spring of 1913 Sappho [i.e. Mrs Catherine Dawson Scott, nicknamed after a poem she had authored] wrote in her diary: '"When Charlotte [Mew] came [to Mrs Dawson Scott's house] I persuaded her to read to us "The Farmer's Bride", and May [Sinclair] was so won over that she deserted me and they went away together."'

Unknown
Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Charlotte Mew      

  

Charlotte Mew : "The Forest Road"

'[Charlotte Mew's poem] "The Forest Road" is almost impossible to follow; Dr Scott [husband of Mew's friend Mrs Catherine Dawson Scott] read it and said it was so deeply realized that he felt the author must be mad'.

Unknown
Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Dr Scott      

  

Charlotte Mew : "The Farmer's Bride"

'Alida [Klementaski], like Mrs [Catherine] Dawson Scott, had read "The Farmer's Bride" in 1912, and had not forgotten it.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Alida Klementaski      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Charlotte Mew : "The Farmer's Bride"

'Alida [Klementaski], like Mrs [Catherine] Dawson Scott, had read "The Farmer's Bride" in 1912, and had not forgotten it.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Catherine Dawson Scott      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Charlotte Mew : The Farmer's Bride

'In the July of 1918 a copy of "The Farmer's Bride" arrived in [Sydney] Cockerell's vast daily post, with a stiff little note from Charlotte [Mew] [...] No worry [...] about his reading it; he always read everything, and he fell in love immediately with "The Farmer's Bride".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Sydney Cockerell      Print: Book

  

Charlotte Mew : The Farmer's Bride

'[Sydney] Cockerell [...] busied himself with sending "The Farmer's Bride" to everyone he could think of [...] Wilfred Scawen Blunt [...] found the situations in Charlotte [Mew]'s poems puzzling and questioned their "sexual sincerity". Siegfried Sassoon was captivated at once and remained her faithful reader always. A. E. Housman [...] liked the little book, although he complained [in letter of 9 September 1918] that, like most female poets, Miss Mew put in ornament that did not suit the speaker.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Wilfred Scawen Blunt      Print: Book

  

Charlotte Mew : The Farmer's Bride

'[Sydney] Cockerell [...] busied himself with sending "The Farmer's Bride" to everyone he could think of [...] Wilfred Scawen Blunt [...] found the situations in Charlotte [Mew]'s poems puzzling and questioned their "sexual sincerity". Siegfried Sassoon was captivated at once and remained her faithful reader always. A. E. Housman [...] liked the little book, although he complained [in letter of 9 September 1918] that, like most female poets, Miss Mew put in ornament that did not suit the speaker.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Siegfried Sassoon      Print: Book

  

Charlotte Mew : The Farmer's Bride

'[Sydney] Cockerell [...] busied himself with sending "The Farmer's Bride" to everyone he could think of [...] Wilfred Scawen Blunt [...] found the situations in Charlotte [Mew]'s poems puzzling and questioned their "sexual sincerity". Siegfried Sassoon was captivated at once and remained her faithful reader always. A. E. Housman [...] liked the little book, although he complained [in letter of 9 September 1918] that, like most female poets, Miss Mew put in ornament that did not suit the speaker.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: A. E. Housman      Print: Book

  

Charlotte Mew : The Farmer's Bride

'In 1916 one of the tasks of the second Mrs Hardy was to read aloud in the evenings at their Dorchester home, Max Gate, to the old great man whom she so carefully tended. It was difficult to know what he would and wouldn't like [...] but he took to "The Farmer's Bride"'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Florence Hardy      Print: Book

  

Charlotte Mew : "Saturday Market"

Penelope Fitzgerald relates how, during Charlotte Mew's stay at his home in December 1918, Thomas Hardy 'read some of his own poems to her, and she read him something which pleased him very much, "Saturday Market".'

Unknown
Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Charlotte Mew      

  

Charlotte Mew : "Sea Love"

'Siegfried Sassoon [...] bought [Sydney] Cockerell the first number of [Harold] Monro's new shilling magazine, "The Monthly Chapbook". On the last page was Charlotte [Mew]'s "Sea Love", certainly a new poem, which delighted both of them (and delighted [Thomas] Hardy too when it arrived at Max Gate).'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Siegfried Sassoon      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Charlotte Mew : "Sea Love"

'Siegfried Sassoon [...] bought [Sydney] Cockerell the first number of [Harold] Monro's new shilling magazine, "The Monthly Chapbook". On the last page was Charlotte [Mew]'s "Sea Love", certainly a new poem, which delighted both of them (and delighted [Thomas] Hardy too when it arrived at Max Gate).'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Sydney Cockerell      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Charlotte Mew : "Sea Love"

'Siegfried Sassoon [...] bought [Sydney] Cockerell the first number of [Harold] Monro's new shilling magazine, "The Monthly Chapbook". On the last page was Charlotte [Mew]'s "Sea Love", certainly a new poem, which delighted both of them (and delighted [Thomas] Hardy too when it arrived at Max Gate).'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Hardy      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Charlotte Mew : "Madeleine in Church"

'Louis Untermeyer [an American poet] [...] had [...] been carried away by "Madeleine[in Church]" when Siegfried Sassoon read it to him [in 1920]'.

Unknown
Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Siegfried Sassoon      

  

Niccolo Machiavelli : La Mandragola

'Finished "La Mandragola", second time reading for the sake of Florentine expressions, and began "La Calandra"'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

John Stuart Mill : Conquest in America, The

'Today we have been to the London Library and I have read J. Mill's article on "The American Conquest".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

Alexandre Dumas (pere) : The Count of Monte Cristo

[at Englefield Green] 'I have finished Pulci there, and read aloud the "Chateau D'If" to G.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

Meiner : [lives of Politian and Pico della Mirandola]

'today I have been reading a book often referred to by Hallam: Meiner's "Lives of Picus von Mirandola and Politian". They are excellent. They have German industry and are succinctly and clearly written'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

Niccolo Machiavelli : Il Principe

'Began "Il Principe".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

Theodor Mommsen : [one of his Roman history works]

'Reading Mommsen and Story's "Roba di Roma". Also Liddell's "Rome", for a narrative to accompany Mommsen's analysis'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

Johann Lorenz von Mosheim [possibly] : [unknown]

'Reading Gibbon Vol 1 in connection with Mosheim. Read about the Dionysia. Also Gieseler, on the condition of the world at the appearance of Christianity'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

Philip Wentworth Buckham : Theatre of the Greeks

'Reading Aeschlyus, "Theatre of the Greeks", Klein's "History of the Drama" etc.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

Samuel Bamford : Passages in the Life of a Radical

'Finished Bamford's "Passages from the life of a Radical". Have just begun again Mill's "Political Economy", and Comte's "Social Science" in Miss Martineau's edition'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

John Stuart Mill : Principles of Political Economy

'Finished Bamford's "Passages from the life of a Radical". Have just begun again Mill's "Political Economy", and Comte's "Social Science" in Miss Martineau's edition'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

Auguste Comte : The Positive Philosophy of Auguste Comte

'Finished Bamford's "Passages from the life of a Radical". Have just begun again Mill's "Political Economy", and Comte's "Social Science" in Miss Martineau's edition'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

Th?odore Claude Henri vicomte Hersart de la Villemarqu : Contes populaires des anciens Bretons

'I have been reading Villemarque's "Contes populaires des Anciens Bretons".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

Charlotte Mew : "Fin de Fete"

After Thomas Hardy's death on 11 January 1928, his literary executor Sydney Cockerell 'found a piece of paper on which Hardy had copied out "Fin de Fete" [by Charlotte Mew]'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Hardy      Print: Serial / periodical

  

John Milton : Samson Agonistes

'The first scene is the Lamentation of Sampson [sic] which possesses much pathos of sublimity ... I think this is beautiful... '

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Alfred Tennyson      Print: Book

  

Mary Russell Mitford : Rienzi (excerpts)

Felicia Hemans to Mary Russell Mitford, 10 November 1828: 'My dear Miss Mitford, Accept my late, though sincere and cordial congratulations on the brilliant success of "Rienzi," of which I have read with unfeigned gratification [...] I have yet only read of Rienzi a few noble passages given by the Newspapers and Magazines, but in a few days I hope to be acquainted with the whole'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Felicia Hemans      Print: Newspaper, Serial / periodical

  

Thomas Moore : Life of Byron

Susan J. Wolfson notes Felicia Hemans's reading (probably some time after 1830) of Thomas Moore's "Life of Byron", 'which dismayed her.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Felicia Hemans      Print: Book

  

Ralph Waldo Emerson : Essays

'I am much obliged to you for the volume of Emerson Essays. I had heard of him before and I know that Carlyle rates him highly. He has great thoughts and imaginations, but he sometimes misleads himself by his own facility of talking brilliantly. However, I have not perhaps studied him sufficiently.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Alfred Tennyson      Print: Book

  

Harriet Martineau : Miss Martineau on Mesmerism

'Ps. Have you read Miss Martineau on Mesmerism in the Athenaeum (two of them). I have got them and if you like I will send them to you. They are very wonderful [underlined]'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Alfred Tennyson      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Tobias Smollett : Ferdinand Count Fathom

'Finished reading Fathom [underlined].'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Alfred Tennyson      Print: Book

  

Coventry Patmore : The aesthetics of gothic architecture

'I now thank you very much for your able inauguration essay on Architecture and live in expectation of its successors.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Alfred Tennyson      Print: Book

  

John Moultrie : The Black Fence

'Mr Moultrie's poem seems spirited but I have had no time to study it well.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Alfred Tennyson      Print: Book

  

Thomas Amory : The life of John Buncle

'It was in one of those cheerful moods that I one day took up The Life of John Buncle; and it is impossible for my friend to imagine with what eagerness and pleasure I read through the whole four volumes of this sensible pleasing work; it was wrote by the late Mr Amory of Wakefield, and I know not of any work more proper to be put into the hands of a poor ignorant bigotted superstititous methodist... In short I saw that true religion was no way incompatible with or an enemy to rational pleasures of any kind. ... I now also began to read with great pleasure the rational and moderate divines of all denominations.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Lackington      Print: Book

  

Morgan : unknown

?After having read the great champions for Christianity, I next read the works of Lord Hesbert, Tindal, Chubb, Morgan, Collins, Woolston, Annet, Mandeville, Shaftesbury, Bolingbroke, Williams, Voltaire, and many other Free-thinkers.?

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Lackington      Print: Book

  

Mandeville : unknown

?After having read the great champions for Christianity, I next read the works of Lord Hesbert, Tindal, Chubb, Morgan, Collins, Woolston, Annet, Mandeville, Shaftesbury, Bolingbroke, Williams, Voltaire, and many other Free-thinkers.?

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Lackington      Print: Book

  

Williams : unknown

?After having read the great champions for Christianity, I next read the works of Lord Hesbert, Tindal, Chubb, Morgan, Collins, Woolston, Annet, Mandeville, Shaftesbury, Bolingbroke, Williams, Voltaire, and many other Free-thinkers.? 237

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Lackington      Print: Book

  

Tobias Smollet : unknown

Another great source of amusement as well as knowledge, I have met with in reading almost all the best novels (Cervantes, Fielding, Smollet, Richardson, Miss Burney, Voltaire, Sterne, Le Sage, Goldsmith and others).?

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Lackington      Print: Book

  

Goldsmith : Vicar of Wakefield

Another great source of amusement as well as knowledge, I have met with in reading almost all the best novels (Cervantes, Fielding, Smollet, Richardson, Miss Burney, Voltaire, Sterne, Le Sage, Goldsmith and others).?

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Lackington      Print: Book

  

Homer : unknown

?? in looking over the title pages, I met with Hobbes translation of Homer, I had some how or other heard that Homer was a great poet, but unfortunately I had never heard of Pope?s translation of him, so we eagerly purchased that by Hobbes. At this stall I also purchased Walker?s Poetical paraphrase of Epictetus?s Morals; and home we went, perfectly well pleased with our bargains. We that evening began with Hobbes's Homer; but found it very difficult for us to read, owing to the obscurity of the translation, which together with the indifferent language, and the want of poetical merit in the translator somewhat disappointed us; however we had from time to time many a hard puzzling hour with him. But as Walker's Epictetus, although it had not much poetical merit, yet it was very easy to be read, and as easily understood; and the principles of the Stoic [underlined] charmed me so much, that I made the book my companion wherever I went, and read it over and over...?

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: James Lackington      Print: Book

  

David Hume : unknown

'I have been keeping rather different hours--though the Priory is far from a late place [...] Wm. [Lady Caroline's husband William Lamb] & I get up about ten or 1/2 after or later [...] have our breakfasts, talk a little, read Newton on the Prophecies with the Bible--having finished Sherlock [...] he goes to eat & walk--I finish dressing & take a drive or little walk [...] then come up stairs where William meets me, & we read Hume with Shakespear till ye dressing bell, then hurry & hardly get dressed by dinner time'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Caroline Lamb      Print: Book

  

Lady Georgiana Morpeth : unknown

'How pretty I think your verses they express so exactly what I felt but could not find words to speak [...]'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Caroline Lamb      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Elizabeth Hamilton : Memoirs of Modern Philosophers

'I have also read the Modern Philosophers, which in spight [sic] of a little vulgarity & too much sameness, I like extremely. Julia's character is beautiful & tho' Harriet Orwell gives one rather too much the idea of a blushing maid with a workbag, & I cannot fancy anything very romantic in the way of love--with an apothecary, yet her character is, I think, extremely well drawn & I like Bridgetina very much.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Caroline Lamb      Print: Book

  

Felicia Hemans : "The Graves of a Household"

Felicia Hemans to John Lodge, July 1831, on visit to Woodstock, Ireland: 'Amongst other persons of the party was Mr Henry Tighe, the widower of the poetess [Mary Tighe]. He had just been exercising, I found, one of his accomplishments in the translation into Latin of a little poem of mine [identified by source editor as "The Graves of a Household"]; and I am told that his version is very elegant.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Henry Tighe      

  

Felicia Browne [later Hemans] : Poems

Thomas Medwin, in his memoir of Shelley: 'In the beginning of [1808] I showed Shelley some poems to which I had subscribed by Felicia Browne [...] Her juvenile productions, remarkable certainly for her age [14] [...] made a powerful impression on Shelley'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Percy Bysshe Shelley      Print: Book

  

Felicia Hemans : American edition comprising two collections of poetical works

Joanna Baillie to Felicia Hemans, 11 May 1827: 'Yesterday your American volume from the Author was put into my hands, and dipping into it here & there without cutting the leaves, I see that it is full of Poetic beauty of the highest value, and that I have a rich feast abiding me'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joanna Baillie      Print: Book

  

Felicia Hemans : uncollected poems

William Wordsworth to Felicia Hemans, 20 April 1834, thanking her for the gift of a copy of her "National Lyrics and Songs for Music": 'many of the Pieces had fallen in my way before they were collected; and had given me more or less pleasure [...] the pleasure is yet to come of perusing your Pieces in succession. I can only say that whenever I have peeped into the volume -- I have been well recompensed. This morning I glanced my eye over the Pilgrim Song to the evening Star with great pleasure.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      

  

Felicia Hemans : National Lyrics and Songs for Music

William Wordsworth to Felicia Hemans, 20 April 1834, thanking her for the gift of a copy of her "National Lyrics and Songs for Music": 'many of the Pieces had fallen in my way before they were collected; and had given me more or less pleasure [...] the pleasure is yet to come of perusing your Pieces in succession. I can only say that whenever I have peeped into the volume -- I have been well recompensed. This morning I glanced my eye over the Pilgrim Song to the evening Star with great pleasure.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Felicia Hemans : "Pilgrim's Song to the Evening Star"

William Wordsworth to Felicia Hemans, 20 April 1834, thanking her for the gift of a copy of her "National Lyrics and Songs for Music": 'many of the Pieces had fallen in my way before they were collected; and had given me more or less pleasure [...] the pleasure is yet to come of perusing your Pieces in succession. I can only say that whenever I have peeped into the volume -- I have been well recompensed. This morning I glanced my eye over the Pilgrim Song to the evening Star with great pleasure.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Felicia Hemans : Scenes and Hymns of Life &c

William Wordsworth to Felicia Hemans, September 1834, praising her verse collection "Scenes and Hymns", of which he was the dedicatee: 'This morning I have read the stanzas upon "Elysium" with great pleasure. You have admirably expanded the thought of Chateaubriand.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Felicia Hemans : "Elysium"

William Wordsworth to Felicia Hemans, September 1834, praising her verse collection "Scenes and Hymns", of which he was the dedicatee: 'This morning I have read the stanzas upon "Elysium" with great pleasure. You have admirably expanded the thought of Chateaubriand.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Wordsworth      Print: Book

  

Sir John Moore : A Narrative of the Campaign of the British Army in Spain

'I began Sir John Mo[o]res letters again and am very much struck if the account is true with the bad management there seems to have been at first setting out. I cannot also conceive how with such letters & opinions daily coming forth such a general infatuation about the Spaniards could prevail [...] [I]n Sir J Mo[o]res letter to Mr. Frere where one can see he is in a tiff at his appointment he agrees with you about titles wrongly bestowed [...] my blood curdled with the quantity of black bile Freres' pompous insignificant impudent letter brought forth.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Caroline Lamb      Print: Book

  

Homer : unknown

'[B]e not thrown into wild delight because his genius has shone forth--misfortune & rage have occasioned this & whenever he may speak himself [underlined] Lord Byron will succeed--self is the sole inspirer of his genius he cannot like Homer Dante Virgil Milton Dryden Spencer Gray--Goldsmith [underlined] Tasso write on other subjects well[--]but what he feels he can describe extravagantly well--& therefore I never did doubt that he would one day or other write again as at first--but for God sake do not let this circumstance make you forget what a Rogue he is''.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Caroline Lamb      

  

John Milton : unknown

'[B]e not thrown into wild delight because his genius has shone forth--misfortune & rage have occasioned this & whenever he may speak himself [underlined] Lord Byron will succeed--self is the sole inspirer of his genius he cannot like Homer Dante Virgil Milton Dryden Spencer Gray--Goldsmith [underlined] Tasso write on other subjects well[--]but what he feels he can describe extravagantly well--& therefore I never did doubt that he would one day or other write again as at first--but for God sake do not let this circumstance make you forget what a Rogue he is'.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Caroline Lamb      Print: Book

  

Oliver Goldsmith : unknown

'[B]e not thrown into wild delight because his genius has shone forth--misfortune & rage have occasioned this & whenever he may speak himself [underlined] Lord Byron will succeed--self is the sole inspirer of his genius he cannot like Homer Dante Virgil Milton Dryden Spencer Gray--Goldsmith [underlined] Tasso write on other subjects well[--]but what he feels he can describe extravagantly well--& therefore I never did doubt that he would one day or other write again as at first--but for God sake do not let this circumstance make you forget what a Rogue he is'.

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Caroline Lamb      Print: Book

  

Lady Caroline Lamb : Ada Reis

'I must tell you an act of kindness of William Lamb--he has been looking over and correcting Ada Reis for me'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Lamb      Manuscript: Unknown, William Lamb would have read either fair copies or proofs from the printer.

  

Lady Caroline Lamb : Graham Hamilton

'Thank you for being pleased with your visit and not displeased with Graham [Hamilton]'.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Godwin      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Thomas Moore : Lalla Rookh

'[A]sk Ld M[orpeth] to read you the lost Peri & see the lines about the boy kneeling & the man of crime are not passing beautiful read it too with your heart and not with rules of criticism--I think many parts of Lalla Rookh perfectly beautiful & the idea and often the poetry but he has heaped such a mass of affection about it & affects such discord to make his harmony more sudden & conspicuous that it requires much good humour to admire'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Caroline Lamb      Print: Book

  

Lady Caroline Lamb : [letters and verses]

'I must tell you that Lord Byron said Mrs Lee [Augusta Leigh?] & Lady Byron had read all my letters [and] verses'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Augusta Leigh      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Lady Caroline Lamb : [letters and verses]

'I must tell you that Lord Byron said Mrs Lee [Augusta Leigh?] & Lady Byron had read all my letters [and] verses'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Annabella Byron (n?e Milbanke)      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Henry James : unknown

'Bennett selected the things that interested him - notably novelists such as Henry James, Thomas Hardy, and his friend George Paston. It was through a review of a book by H. G. Wells that the two men first became friends, Bennett taking the initiative and writing to Wells in September 1897 to say how much he liked his work, and to ask him how well he knew the Potteries, which Wells had mentioned in several of his stories.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Arnold Bennett      Print: Book

  

George Moore : A Mummer's Wife

'he claimed that he had not thought of using them [the Potteries] as fiction until he read another man's work of fiction, George Moore's A Mummer's wife [title in italics]; he wrote to Moore on 24 December 1920, "I wish also to tell you that it was the first chapters of A Mummer's wife [title in italics] which opened my eyes to the romantic nature of the district I had blindly inhabited for over twenty years.'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Arnold Bennett      Print: Book

  

George Moore : A Mummer's Wife

'A Mummer's Wife [title in italics] had impressed him very much with its power and its Staffordshire setting.'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Arnold Bennett      Print: Book

  

John Stuart Mill : On Liberty

'I have been reading Fawcett's Economic condition of the Working Classes, Mill's Liberty, looking into Strauss's Second Life of Jesus, and reading Neale's History of the Puritans of which I have reached the fourth volume'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: Book

  

Henry Hallam : The View of the State of Europe during the Middle Ages

'began Hallam's Middle Ages'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay :  [perhaps] History of England [?]

'This evening read again Macaulay's Introduction'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: Book

  

John Stuart Mill : A System of Logic

'I am reading Mill's Logic again, Theocritus still, and English History and Law'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: Book

  

Jean Charles L?onard de Sismondi : [unknown - on Spain]

'I have taken up the idea of my drama, "The Spanish Gipsy" again, and am reading on Spanish subjects - Bouterwek, Sismondi, Depping, Llorente etc'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

Homer : Iliad

'Reading the Iliad, book III'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

Eliakim Carmoly : Histoire des M?decins Juifs

'Finished reading "Averroes and l'Averroisme", and "Les Medecins Juifs". Reading "First Principles".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

Salomon Munk : Melanges de Philosophie Juive et Arabe

'Reading Munk, Melanges de Philosophie juive et arabe'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: Book

  

unknown Guillemin : [presumably astronomy text]

'Finished Guillemin on the Heavens'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: Book

  

Homer : Iliad

'Reading; First book of Lucretius, 6th book of the Iliad; Samson Agonistes, Warton's History of English Poetry; Grote 2nd vol; Marcus Aurelius; Vita Nuova; vol IV, Chapter 1 of the Politique positive; Guest on English Rhythms, Maurice's Lectures on Casuistry'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Samson Agonistes

'Reading; First book of Lucretius, 6th book of the Iliad; Samson Agonistes, Warton's History of English Poetry; Grote 2nd vol; Marcus Aurelius; Vita Nuova; vol IV, Chapter 1 of the Politique positive; Guest on English Rhythms, Maurice's Lectures on Casuistry'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: Book

  

Auguste Comte : Syst?me de politique positive

'Reading; First book of Lucretius, 6th book of the Iliad; Samson Agonistes, Warton's History of English Poetry; Grote 2nd vol; Marcus Aurelius; Vita Nuova; vol IV, Chapter 1 of the Politique positive; Guest on English Rhythms, Maurice's Lectures on Casuistry'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: Book

  

Frederick Denison Maurice : Conscience: Lectures On Casuistry

'Reading; First book of Lucretius, 6th book of the Iliad; Samson Agonistes, Warton's History of English Poetry; Grote 2nd vol; Marcus Aurelius; Vita Nuova; vol IV, Chapter 1 of the Politique positive; Guest on English Rhythms, Maurice's Lectures on Casuistry'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: Book

  

Homer : Iliad

'have been reading a little on philology, have finished the 24th book of the Iliad, the first book of the Faery Queene, Clough's poems, and a little about Etruscan things in Mrs Grey and Dennis. Aloud to G. I have been reading some Italian, Ben Jonson's Alchemist and Volpone, and Bright's speeches, which I am still reading - besides the first four cantos of Don Juan'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: Book

  

W Thomson : [essay in Revue des Cours]

'In the evening read aloud Bright's 4th speech on India, and a story in Italian. In the spectator some interesting facts about loss of memory, and "double life". In the Revue des Cours a lecture by Sir W. Thomson of Edinburgh on the retardation of the earth's motion round its axis'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Alessandro Manzoni : I Promessi Sposi

'Aloud [these past two days] I have read Bright's speeches and "I promessi sposi". To myself I have read Mommsen's Rome'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: Book

  

Theodor Mommsen : History of Rome

'Aloud [these past two days] I have read Bright's speeches and "I promessi sposi". To myself I have read Mommsen's Rome'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud.]      Print: Book

  

Hermann von Helmholtz : [book on music]

'I am reading about plants, and Helmholtz on music'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

Smith : Universal History

'Read the articles Phoenicia and Carthage in Ancient Geography. Looked into Smith's "Universal History" again for Carthaginian religion. Looked into Sismondi's "Litterature du Midi", for Roman de Rose, and ran through the first chapter, about the formation of the Romance Languages. Read about the Thallogens and Acrogens in "the Vegetable World". Drayton's Nymphidia - a charming poem. A few pages of his Polyolbion. Re-read Grote v-vii on Sicilian affairs down to rise of Dionysius'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

Jean Charles L?onard de Sismondi : Litt?rature du midi de l'Europe

'Read the articles Phoenicia and Carthage in Ancient Geography. Looked into Smith's "Universal History" again for Carthaginian religion. Looked into Sismondi's "Litterature du Midi", for Roman de Rose, and ran through the first chapter, about the formation of the Romance Languages. Read about the Thallogens and Acrogens in "the Vegetable World". Drayton's Nymphidia - a charming poem. A few pages of his Polyolbion. Re-read Grote v-vii on Sicilian affairs down to rise of Dionysius'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

John Mandeville (pseud.) : Travels

'I am reading Maundeville's "Travels".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

Max Muller : History of Ancient Sanskrit Literature

'I have read rapidly through Max Muller's History of Sanskrit Literature and am now reading Lecky's "History of Morals". I have also finished H. Spencer's last number of his Psychology'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot      Print: Book

  

Thomas Robert Malthus : Essay on the Principle of Population

Mary Berry to a friend, 19 November 1798: 'Don't let me forget to advise you to to read the "Natural Son," or "Lovers' Vows;" it is the entire and literal translation of the play which is now acting with such success at Covent Garden, but [italics]not[end italics] as it is acted; you can get it at Todd's [bookseller's], where I did, to read in the chaise [...] Another book which I purchased at Todd's and read in my chaise was the "Essay on Population" which Mr. Wrangham left with you. It is uncommonly clearly thought and written, and contains much curious and uncontrovertible reasoning on the subject in question.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Berry      Print: Book

  

Michel de Montaigne : Essays

Mary Berry to a friend, 14 December, 1798: 'During my illness I have finished the 2nd vol. of Wraxhall which I had just begun at Brandsby, and which I like better and better the farther I go. I have consulted, too, one of his authorities for many things in the age of Henry the Third, Montaigne's Essays, a very curious and an [italics]astonishing[end italics] book, considering the times in which it was written, and which one never consults without entertainment. I have re-read, too, Condorcet's book, and compared his ideas and arguments on the subject of population with those of the Essay [by Malthus] we have been reading, and certainly the Essay has not only the best of the argument [...] but is absolute [italics]conviction[end italics]on the subject of the different ratios in which population, and the means of subsisting that population, increase'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Berry      Print: Book

  

Thomas Robert Malthus : Essay on the Principle of Population

Mary Berry to a friend, 14 December, 1798: 'During my illness I have finished the 2nd vol. of Wraxhall which I had just begun at Brandsby, and which I like better and better the farther I go. I have consulted, too, one of his authorities for many things in the age of Henry the Third, Montaigne's Essays, a very curious and an [italics]astonishing[end italics] book, considering the times in which it was written, and which one never consults without entertainment. I have re-read, too, Condorcet's book, and compared his ideas and arguments on the subject of population with those of the Essay [by Malthus] we have been reading, and certainly the Essay has not only the best of the argument [...] but is absolute [italics]conviction[end italics]on the subject of the different ratios in which population, and the means of subsisting that population, increase'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

Mary Berry, in reflections on reading (1798): 'When I read "Paradise Lost," I am no more able to conceive the powers of imagination and genius exerted by Milton in the composition of that poem, than I am able to conceive the intellect of Sir Isaac Newton in the demonstration of the phenomena of the universe. Both seem to me beings more exalted above myself in the scale of intellectual perfection, than I am above the brute creation.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Berry      Print: Book

  

Thomas Somerville : History of Great Britain During the Reign of Queen Anne; with a Dissertation concerning the Danger of the Protestant Succession

Mary Berry to Mrs Cholmeley, 12 January 1799: 'Somerville's "Anne" is, I think, more dry than his "William," but clear, distinct, impartial, and wonderfully informing; his chapters on the Union of Scotland are particularly so [goes on to note aspects of Scottish situation during Queen Anne's reign, including rebellious elements ('of none of which circumstances I had before any just idea') and to compare this with current situation in Ireland]'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Berry      Print: Book

  

Colonel Mathew : letter

Mary Berry to Mrs Cholmeley, 3 February 1799: 'I hope you have read the Irish debates on the Union. I think you will have found in them much abuse, little eloquence, and very little argument [...] I myself was shown a letter by Mathew (Col. Mathew), which, from its handwriting, and the office manner in which it was drawn up, I am sure must have come from a clerk of the Parliament'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Berry      Manuscript: Letter

  

Thomas Belsham : A Review of Mr. Wilberforce's Practical View of the Prevailing Religious Systems of Professed Christians

Mary Berry to Mrs Cholmeley, 3 February 1799: 'In compliance with your request and my own wishes, I have been and am reading with much attention Mr. Wilberforce's book, and likewise strictures on it, in a series of letters by Mr. Belsham'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Berry      Print: Unknown

  

Hannah More : Strictures on the Modern System of Female Education

Mary Berry to Mrs Cholmeley, 2 April 1799: 'In the many hours I have spent alone this week, I have been able, though by very little bits at a time, to go entirely through Hannah More [whose "Strictures on the Modern System of Female Education" she writes of receiving on 21 March 1799], and Mrs. Woolstonecroft [sic] immediately after her.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Berry      Print: Book

  

William Mason : Poems (third volume)

The Dowager Lady Spencer to Mary Berry, from Nuneham (seat of George Simon, second Earl of Harcourt), 21 August 1799: 'Have you ever seen the 3d vol. of Mason's Poems, published two years ago? I never did till I came here; and I have found some sweet things in them, which I have been reading this morning in the flower-garden facing the cinerary urn Lord Harcourt has erected to his memory [goes on to transcribe final six lines of sonnet written by Mason 'in his 70th year'].'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: G., Dowager Lady Spencer      Print: Book

  

Bartholomew Mercier : Le Nouveau Paris

Mary Berry, letter of 26 December 1799: 'What little I could read during two days and part of two nights has been Mercier's "Nouveau Paris", a sort of continuation of his former "Tableau de Paris". This last, in six vols. is one of the most stupid, unclearly thought, ridiculous books I ever saw, and yet I read it, not without entertainment and instruction'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Berry      Print: Book

  

Bartholomew Mercier : Tableau de Paris

Mary Berry, letter of 26 December 1799: 'What little I could read during two days and part of two nights has been Mercier's "Nouveau Paris", a sort of continuation of his former "Tableau de Paris". This last, in six vols. is one of the most stupid, unclearly thought, ridiculous books I ever saw, and yet I read it, not without entertainment and instruction'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Berry      Print: Book

  

Mackintosh : [unidentified "accounts of hs proposed lectures on the Law of Nature and Nations"]

Mary Berry, letter of 26 December 1799: 'What little I could read during two days and part of two nights has been Mercier's "Nouveau Paris", a sort of continuation of his former "Tableau de Paris". This last, in six vols. is one of the most stupid, unclearly thought, ridiculous books I ever saw, and yet I read it, not without entertainment and instruction [...] Of a very different nature is a little book I have lately read over again for the third or fourth time, -- I mean, Mackintosh's accounts of his proposed lectures on the Law of Nature and Nations. Such a compendious syllabus of all the leading principles of truth and virtue I never met with! I mentioned it to you last year, I think, when I first got it.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Berry      Print: Book

  

Richard (pseud.) Aldington [real name] : Death of a Hero

'The fresh-sounding work of the war generation, which began to appear in the late 1920s and early 1930s, provided him with important models. Huxley, Wells and Aldington (especially "Death of a Hero") were rapidly digested; his poetic models were Edith Sitwell, Aldington, Nichols, Sassoon and Graves (in the cheap Benn's Sixpenny Poets editions), to be followed by the more lasting influences of Eliot and D.H. Lawrence...He read an essay by Lawrence in which he showed how England treated its writers. That, he said, made him decide "to swim against the current".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Lawrence Durrell      Print: Book

  

Richard (pseud.) Aldington [real name] : [poetry]

'The fresh-sounding work of the war generation, which began to appear in the late 1920s and early 1930s, provided him with important models. Huxley, Wells and Aldington (especially "Death of a Hero") were rapidly digested; his poetic models were Edith Sitwell, Aldington, Nichols, Sassoon and Graves (in the cheap Benn's Sixpenny Poets editions), to be followed by the more lasting influences of Eliot and D.H. Lawrence...He read an essay by Lawrence in which he showed how England treated its writers. That, he said, made him decide "to swim against the current".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Lawrence Durrell      Print: Book

  

Arthur Rimbaud : [unknown]

'He lapped up those French writers who kicked against those conventions - Rabelais, Villon, Baudelaire, Rimbaud'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Lawrence Durrell      Print: Book

  

Christopher Marlowe : [unknown]

'Durrell's studies at the British Museum turned even further towards the Elizabethans. He took in Sidney, Marlowe, Nashe, Greene, Peel and Tourneur, as well as Shakespeare'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Lawrence Durrell      Print: Book

  

Remy de Gourmont : [unknown]

'He consumed works of western philosophy, from Rousseau to Wyndham Lewis. All this he added to his diet of sexology - Freud, Remy de Gourmont, de Sade and Krafft-Ebing. And with the Mediterranean in mind, he read D.H. Lawrence's "Sea and Sardinia" and Norman Douglas's "South Wind"'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Lawrence Durrell      Print: Book

  

Henry Miller : Tropic of Cancer

'Barclay Hudson, an American living near by, lent him a new novel to read. It was published in Paris by the Obelisk Press, a publisher specializing mainly in pornography in English for visiting tourists, and in books banned elsewhere. The novel Hudson lent him was the recently published "Tropic of Cancer" by Henry Miller. The impact was immediate, and he read it straight through twice..."There isn't a good word to express its excellence", he wrote. "Of course, like all works of genius it's strong fruit and you'd have to be careful about getting it into England".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Lawrence Durrell      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Comus (A mask Presented at Ludlow Castle, 1634)

'Shelley reads a part of Comus aloud.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Percy Bysshe Shelley      Print: Book

  

David Hume : The History of England (presumably)

'Much of it [ie. ?the daily instruction I received?] consisted in the books I read by myself, and my father?s discourses to me, chiefly during our walks. From 1810 to the end of 1813 we were living in Newington Green, then an almost rustic neighbourhood. My father?s health required considerable and constant exercise, and he walked habitually before breakfast, generally in the green lanes towards Hornsey. In these walks I always accompanied him, and with my earliest recollections of green fields and wild flowers, is mingled that of the account I gave him daily of what I had read the day before. To the best of my remembrance, this was a voluntary rather than a prescribed exercise. I made notes on slips of paper while reading, and from these, in the morning walks, I told the story to him; for the books were chiefly histories, of which I read in this manner a great number: Robertson?s histories, Hume, Gibbon; but my greatest delight, then and for long afterwards, was Watson?s Philip the Second and Third. The heroic defence of the Knights of Malta against the Turks, and of the revolted provinces of the Netherlands against Spain, excited in me an intense and lasting interest. Next to Watson, my favourite historical reading was Hooke?s History of Rome. Of Greece I had seen at that time no regular history, except school abridgments and the last two or three volumes of a translation of Rollin?s Ancient History, beginning with Philip of Macedon. But I read with great delight Langhorne?s translation of Plutarch. In English history, beyond the time at which Hume leaves off, I remember reading Burnett?s History of his Own Time, though I cared little for anything in it except the wars and battles; and the historical part of the Annual Register, from the beginning to about 1788, where the volumes my father borrowed for me from Mr Bentham left off?. In these frequent talks about the books I read, he used, as opportunity offered, to give me explanations and ideas respecting civilization, government, morality, mental cultivation, which he required me afterwards to restate to him in my own words.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Stuart Mill      Print: Book

  

John Millar : Historical View of the English Government

'He [?my father?] also made me read, and give him a verbal account of, many books which would not have interested me sufficiently to induce me to read them of myself: among others, Millar?s Historical View of the English Government, a book of great merit for its time, and which he highly valued; Mosheim?s Ecclesiastical History, McCrie?s Life of John Knox, and even Sewell?s and Rutty?s Histories of the Quakers.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Stuart Mill      Print: Book

  

Johann Lorenz von Mosheim : An Ecclesiastical History, Ancient and Modern, from the Birth of Christ, to the Beginning of the Present Century

'He [?my father?] also made me read, and give him a verbal account of, many books which would not have interested me sufficiently to induce me to read them of myself: among others, Millar?s Historical View of the English Government, a book of great merit for its time, and which he highly valued; Mosheim?s Ecclesiastical History, McCrie?s Life of John Knox, and even Sewell?s and Rutty?s Histories of the Quakers.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Stuart Mill      Print: Book

  

Thomas McCrie : Life of John Knox

'He [?my father?] also made me read, and give him a verbal account of, many books which would not have interested me sufficiently to induce me to read them of myself: among others, Millar?s Historical View of the English Government, a book of great merit for its time, and which he highly valued; Mosheim?s Ecclesiastical History, McCrie?s Life of John Knox, and even Sewell?s and Rutty?s Histories of the Quakers.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Stuart Mill      Print: Book

  

Tymms : Family Topographer

'About this period, Mr Tymms sent down for inspection the proof of his Acct. of Northamptonshire for the Family Topographer to which I added several paragraphs and corrected others.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Cole      Print: Proof

  

Ralph Waldo Emerson : unknown

'The house was behind the post office and below the town library, and in a few years not even the joys of guddling, girning and angling matched the boy's pleasure in Emerson, Hawthorne, Ambrose Pierce, Sidney Lanier and Mark Twain. Day after day... he carried a large washing basket up the stairs to fill it with books, choosing from upwards of twelve thousand volumes, then downstairs to sit for hours in corners absorbed in mental worlds beyond the narrow limits of Langholm.'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Christopher Grieve      Print: Book

  

Auguste Comte : [correspondence with Valat]

'Aloud I read the concluding part of Walter Scott's "Life" which we had begun at Harrogate, two volumes of Froude's "History of England", and Comte's correspondence with Valat'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

John Stuart Mill : [on socialism]

'Read J.S. Mill on Socialism'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

Hugo Magnus : Die Geschichtliche Entwickelung des Farbensinnes

'Read Magnus on the Farbensinn'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: BookManuscript: Unknown

  

Thomson : The Seasons [probably]

'Mary, William and Emma commenced their readings of Thomson.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary, William and Emma Cole     Print: Book

  

Homer : Iliad

[Read] 'Iliad in Munro's edition'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

Homer : [book IV - of Iliad?]

'Homer IV. Foster, Physiology'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

Oliver Goldsmith : [poems]

'It was at this time that I read the remaining seven volumes of the "Spectator"; to which I added the "Rambler", the "Tatler", and some others of the "British Essayists". I also read the poetical works of Milton, Addison, Goldsmith, Gray, Collins, Falconer, Pomfret, Akenside, Mrs. Rowe, with others which I cannot now clearly call to mind. I remember, however, to have read Gay's poems. These gave me more than usual satisfaction. I was much amused with his "Trivia, or the Art of Walking London Streets" but I was especially pleased with his admirably burlesque "pastorals". These just squared with my humour, for I had then, as I have ever had, an utter dislike to the sickening stuff that is called the pastoral poetry...I must not omit to mention the pleasure I derived from reading a poem called "The Village Curate", which, I think, has fallen into unmerited oblivion.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

John Pomfret : [poems]

'It was at this time that I read the remaining seven volumes of the "Spectator"; to which I added the "Rambler", the "Tatler", and some others of the "British Essayists". I also read the poetical works of Milton, Addison, Goldsmith, Gray, Collins, Falconer, Pomfret, Akenside, Mrs. Rowe, with others which I cannot now clearly call to mind. I remember, however, to have read Gay's poems. These gave me more than usual satisfaction. I was much amused with his "Trivia, or the Art of Walking London Streets" but I was especially pleased with his admirably burlesque "pastorals". These just squared with my humour, for I had then, as I have ever had, an utter dislike to the sickening stuff that is called the pastoral poetry...I must not omit to mention the pleasure I derived from reading a poem called "The Village Curate", which, I think, has fallen into unmerited oblivion.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

Thomas Moore : 'Corruption'

Mary Berry, Journal, 9 June 1808: 'Dined at Lady Donegal's with Agnes [Berry, her sister]. Philippa (Godfrey), Charles Moore, and Anacreon [ie Thomas] Moore at dinner. I praised highly the two poems ("Corruption" and "Intolerance") that I had been reading in the morning, before the author (little Moore), without knowing it. After dinner he owned the fact, and was much pleased with my unsuspicious praise.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Berry      Print: Book

  

Thomas Moore : 'Intolerance'

Mary Berry, Journal, 9 June 1808: 'Dined at Lady Donegal's with Agnes [Berry, her sister]. Philippa (Godfrey), Charles Moore, and Anacreon [ie Thomas] Moore at dinner. I praised highly the two poems ("Corruption" and "Intolerance") that I had been reading in the morning, before the author (little Moore), without knowing it. After dinner he owned the fact, and was much pleased with my unsuspicious praise.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Berry      Print: Book

  

Thomas Moore : 'Intolerance'

Mary Berry, Journal, 11 June 1808: 'In the evening I read 'Corruption' and 'Intolerance' aloud.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Berry      Print: Book

  

Thomas Moore : 'Corruption'

Mary Berry, Journal, 11 June 1808: 'In the evening I read 'Corruption' and 'Intolerance' aloud.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Berry      Print: Book

  

Merritt (Mrs) : [recollections of her husband]

'Read [Mrs Merritt's] recollections of Mr Merritt.'

Unknown
Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      

  

Monier Monier Williams : [presumably work on Sanskrit]

'Finished Monier Williams'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

George John Romanes : Candid Examination of Theism, A

[Read] 'Romanes, 'Theism'. Tiele, History of Religions. Odyssey.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

Homer : Odyssey

[Read] 'Romanes, 'Theism'. Tiele, History of Religions. Odyssey.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

Frances Anne Kemble : Records of a Girlhood

'Finished Fanny Kemble's Records of a girlhood'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

Thomas Malthus : unknown

'Finished Prose Edda, etc. Akkadians. Malthus.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

Alessandro Manzoni : I Promessi Sposi

[Read] 'Sayce and Promessi Sposi'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

Jean Le Rond D'Alembert : Discours pr?liminaire de l'Encyclop?die

'Finished the Discours Preliminaire'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

Auguste Comte : [unknown]

'Read Comte and began Hermann and Dorothea'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

Friedrich Max Muller : Lectures on the Science of Language

'Having finished Spencer's Sociology we began Max Muller's Lectures on the Science of Language'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot and John Cross     Print: Book

  

Frederic William Henry Myers : Wordsworth

'after dinner began Duffield's translation of Don Quixote and Myers' Wordsworth'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: George Eliot [pseud]      Print: Book

  

Thomas Campbell : Letters from Algiers

'He also again freely supplied me with the loan of books. At this time he lent me several volumes of the "New Monthly Magazine", among the very many interesting articles in which I was especially pleased with the "Letters from Algiers", written by Mr. Thomas Campbell, the eminent poet'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Michel de Montaigne : 

'I do sometimes wish for my library here, where it costs trouble to other people to get books for me, and yet I have done well enough lately with Montaigne, and a bit of Moliere with the boys, now and then, and I Promessi Sposi with Fanny discovering thereby that I can read Italian almost like French or English, which I was not aware of'.

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Print: Book

  

Moliere (pseud.) : unknown

'I do sometimes wish for my library here, where it costs trouble to other people to get books for me, and yet I have done well enough lately with Montaigne, and a bit of Moliere with the boys, now and then, and I Promessi Sposi with Fanny discovering thereby that I can read Italian almost like French or English, which I was not aware of'.

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Print: Book

  

Alessandro Manzoni : I Promessi Sposi

'I do sometimes wish for my library here, where it costs trouble to other people to get books for me, and yet I have done well enough lately with Montaigne, and a bit of Moliere with the boys, now and then, and I Promessi Sposi with Fanny discovering thereby that I can read Italian almost like French or English, which I was not aware of'.

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Print: Book

  

Ralph Waldo Emerson : Essays

'Have you read Emerson's Essays? I suppose it is the first immortal Amern book. It has come to me like a visitation of health'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Print: Book

  

Philip Massinger : The Duke of Milan

Mary Berry, Journal, 3 September 1808: 'In the evening Mr. Morritt read to us one of Massinger's plays ("The Duke of Milan").'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John B. S. Morritt      Print: Book

  

Philip Massinger : The Duke of Milan

Mary Berry, Journal, 5 September 1808: 'In the evening Mr. Morritt continued reading the "Duke of Milan." He reads very well, and Massinger is not easy to read.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John B. S. Morritt      Print: Book

  

Philip Massinger : The Fatal Dowry

Mary Berry, Journal, 6 September 1808: 'In the evening Mr. Morritt began reading another of Massinger's plays [having finished "The Duke of Milan"], the "Fatal Dowry," from which Rowe has taken the story of "The Fair Penitent." The characters of the father and the husband in "The Fatal Dowry" are more interesting than in "The Fair Penitent;" but the events and catastrophes are badly drawn, and the wife detestable.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John B. S. Morritt      Print: Book

  

Captain Adam : Letter to father

Mary Berry, Journal, 10 September 1808, during stay at Bothwell Castle, seat of Lord Douglas: 'Lord and Lady Rosslyn arrived at four o'clock [...] Lord Rosslyn gave me a letter to read from Captain Adam to his father, praising the conduct of Ronald at Vimeira in the most satisfactory manner. I went away to read it, which I did not do without tears.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Berry      Manuscript: Letter

  

John Milton : 'Invocation to Light'

Mary Berry, Journal, 8 June 1811: 'Went to Lady Cork's. A curious party, where, by way of something to do, she had [John] Thelwall reading Milton's "Invocation to Light," so abominably as to amuse or shock all the company.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Thelwall      Print: Book

  

Oliver Wendell Holmes : Elsie Venner

'No doubt it is to you that I owe this pleasure, - of Buckle's 2d vol. Maria has been cutting and skimming, and she opines that I shall find it a very great treat indeed. My best thanks to you for it, dear friend. I am in the thick of a very different sort of book now, - "Elsie Venner", which I did not mean to read; but a look at the first page carried me on: How immensely clever some of these Americans are! and their style of tale so new! I dislike all the part connected with Elsie: but I enjoy the New England atmosphere of the thing, and the wonderful power of deep and incessant observation'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Print: Book

  

John Lothrop Motley : Causes of the Civil War in America [probably]

'We are reading Motley's last, - much surprised not to like it better. It is so diffuse and sinks so very low in its Carlylisms &c.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      

  

David Hume : [Essays]

?While in this state I read the "Letters" of Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, and some of Dr Beattie?s and Mr Hume?s ?Essays?, together with part of Dr Beattie?s ?Essay on Truth?.?

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carter      Print: Book

  

Mary Wortley Montagu : [Letters]

'Seward had been reading a five-volume edition of Lady Mary Wortley Montagu's letters, and she had confessed her irritation with Lady Mary's avowed contempt for Pope' [see letter to Mrs Childers, 1804]

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anna Seward      Print: Book

  

Homer : Odyssey

'As Catherine Talbot later remarked of the "Odyssey", "Mr Pope's verse can give dignity to a peg or a pig, and the divine Eumaeus is so worthy a man, that I overlook the unlucky circumstance of his being a hogherd' [Letter to Elizabeth Carter, October 1746]

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Catherine Talbot      Print: Book

  

Homer : Iliad

'After reading Pope's "Illiad", the sixteen-year-old Burney confided in her journal that "I was never so charm'd with a poem in my life".'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Frances Burney      Print: Book

  

John Milton : [unknown]

'[Anna Seward's] training was not necessarily less rigorous for being informal and solitary. Seward scoffed at a male contemporary who claimed never to have read or studied poetry. "If Shakespeare's talents were miracles of uncultured intuition, we feel, that neither Milton's, Pope's, Akenside's, Gray's or Darwin's were such, but that poetic investigation, and long familiarity with the best writers in that line, cooperated to produce their excellence".'

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anna Seward      Print: Book

  

Hannah More : [verses on opening of walk by Bishop of London]

Horace Walpole to Mary Berry, 10 July 1789: 'I enclose a most beautiful copy of verses which Miss H[annah]. More wrote very lately when she was with [the Bishop of London] ...] at Fulham, on his opening a walk to a bench called Bonner's. Mrs. Boscawen showed them to me, and I insisted on printing them. Only 200 copies are taken off, half for her and half for the printer, and you have one of the first.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Horace Walpole      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Tobias Smollett : Complete History of England

'At ten the poor infant was reading Smollett's History... She summed up her impression with scornful lucidity: "There seem to have been more weak kings than wise ones".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Isabella (Annabella) Milbanke      Print: Book

  

Thomas Campbell : [poetry]

'there was always poetry. Campbell, just then at the top of his short-lived vogue; Ossian, the unreadable of to-day; Milton - and with the New Year of 1812 a Captain Boothby (met during the London season) as a visitor with whom to read the last, but not the other two. For he did not admire Campbell or Ossian; and indeed seems to have been a person of delicate discriminations, though not advanced in thought. They were reading "Paradise Lost"...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Isabella (Annabella) Milbanke      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

'there was always poetry. Campbell, just then at the top of his short-lived vogue; Ossian, the unreadable of to-day; Milton - and with the New Year of 1812 a Captain Boothby (met during the London season) as a visitor with whom to read the last, but not the other two. For he did not admire Campbell or Ossian; and indeed seems to have been a person of delicate discriminations, though not advanced in thought. They were reading "Paradise Lost"...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Isabella (Annabella) Milbanke and Captain Boothby     Print: Book

  

John Milton : Comus

'A Reverend Mr Darnell followed in this January of 1812. He too read Milton. This time it was Comus, and the whole party joined in, Annabella and her guests taking the various parts. They did the Trial-Scene from the Merchant of Venice too, and she "never heard anyone read with more discriminating judgment than Mr Darnell".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Isabella (Annabella) Milbanke, Rev. Darnell and other house guests     Print: Book

  

Homer : Iliad

'Annabella was now reading Cowper's "Iliad" and annotating evey second line; she was studying Alfieri with the family-solicitor's daughter; for relaxation condescending to "Evelina". In "Evelina" she was disappointed, like a good many more of its readers - more perhaps than make the confession. There was study of Southey, Wordsworth, and Coleridge as well, for everyone was reading them... Annabella waded through "Madoc". She found some passages wearisome but was convinced that Southey would one day be ranked high "among the ancient poets".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Isabella (Annabella) Milbanke      Print: Book

  

J.C. de Sismondi : history of the Italian republics;: Being a view of the origin, progress, and fall of Italian freedom, A

'she asked [Byron] to recommend her some books of modern history. At present she was reading Sismondi's "Italian Republics". And she had read "Lara". Shakespeare alone possessed the same power as Byron had there displayed'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Isabella (Annabella) Milbanke      Print: Book

  

J.C. de Sismondi : history of the Italian republics;: Being a view of the origin, progress, and fall of Italian freedom, A

[Letter from Byron to Annabella Milbanke, Aug 25th 1814]. 'You can hardly have a better modern work than Sismondi's, but he has since published another on the Literature of Italy, Spain &c., which I would willingly recommend... on my return to London I would gladly forward it... Gibbon is well worth a hundred perusals. Watson's Philip of Spain, and Coxe's Spain and Austria are dry enough; but there is some advantage to be extracted even from them. Vertot's Revolutions (but writes not history but romance). The best thing of that kind I met by accident at Athens in a Convent Library in old and not "very choice Italian". I forget the title - but it was a history in some thirty tomes of all Conjurazioni whatsoever from Catiline's down to Count Fiesco of Lavagna's in Genoa and Braganza's in Lisbon. I read it through (having nothing else to read) & having nothing to compare it withal, thought it perfection'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon, Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

Jean Charles de Sismondi : Litt?rature du midi de l'Europe

[Letter from Byron to Annabella Milbanke, Aug 25th 1814]. 'You can hardly have a better modern work than Sismondi's, but he has since published another on the Literature of Italy, Spain &c., which I would willingly recommend... on my return to London I would gladly forward it... Gibbon is well worth a hundred perusals. Watson's Philip of Spain, and Coxe's Spain and Austria are dry enough; but there is some advantage to be extracted even from them. Vertot's Revolutions (but writes not history but romance). The best thing of that kind I met by accident at Athens in a Convent Library in old and not "very choice Italian". I forget the title - but it was a history in some thirty tomes of all Conjurazioni whatsoever from Catiline's down to Count Fiesco of Lavagna's in Genoa and Braganza's in Lisbon. I read it through (having nothing else to read) & having nothing to compare it withal, thought it perfection'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: George Gordon, Lord Byron      Print: Book

  

Harriet Martineau : Five Years of Youth: or, Sense and Sentiment

'[Annabella] had been reading Harriet Martineau's "Five Years of Youth", and wrote to a friend: "it is very good - chiefly directed against Romance, and therefore not necessary for Ada".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Isabella (Annabella), Baroness Byron      Print: Book

  

George Macdonald : Within and Without

'It was through the reading of his narrative poem, "Within and Without" (published in 1855, but written a few years earlier), that their acquaintance began. She wrote to him of her admiration, and soon afterwards they met'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Anne Isabella (Annabella), Baroness Byron      Print: Book

  

Frederick Marryat : [unknown]

'By the age of ten he had gone through E.W. Lane's three-volume translation of "The Book of the Thousand Nights and One Night", Scott's Waverley novels, Carroll's "Alice in Wonderland" and "Through the Looking Glass", the adventure stories of Captain Marryat, everything of Harrison Ainsworth, and other, now forgotten, works'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: William Somerset Maugham      Print: Book

  

Edward Jerningham : Prologue to The Siege of Berwick

Horace Walpole to Mary Berry, 23 November 1793, on meeting Edward Jerningham ('the Charming Man') at a gathering at the home of their friend Anne Damer the previous evening: 'I congratulated the Charming highly on the success of his tragedy ["The Siege of Berwick", which opened 13 November at Covent Garden], and on his prologue, which I had seen in the papers and like'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Horace Walpole      Print: Newspaper

  

[probably] James Murphy : [probably] Travels in Portugal ... in the Years 1789-90

Horace Walpole to Mary Berry, 22 November 1795: 'I will, while expecting Marchand [...] transcribe the wonderful Sanscrit paragraph which you found t'other morning in Murphy's "Portugal," and which you will like to possess: -- '"From whose splendid virtues, the great men, who delight to sport in the atoms which float in the beams of light issuing from the beauty of the leaf of the sleepy Ketahee of the diadem of the goddess Saraskatee, went to adorn the females of the eight points."'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Horace Walpole      Print: Book

  

[probably] James Murphy : [probably] Travels in Portugal ... in the Years 1789-90

Horace Walpole to Mary Berry, 22 November 1795: 'I will, while expecting Marchand [...] transcribe the wonderful Sanscrit paragraph which you found t'other morning in Murphy's "Portugal," and which you will like to possess: -- '"From whose splendid virtues, the great men, who delight to sport in the atoms which float in the beams of light issuing from the beauty of the leaf of the sleepy Ketahee of the diadem of the goddess Saraskatee, went to adorn the females of the eight points."'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Berry      Print: Book

  

Thomas Campbell : First discourse upon Poetry

Mary Berry, Journal, 26 June 1812: 'We dined with the Princess [of Wales] at Kensington. The company: Lady C. Lindsay, Lady C. Campbell, Mr. Lewis, Sir H. and Lady Davy, Sir J. Mackintosh, Sir H. Englefield, Mrs. and Miss Pole, Lord Glenbervie and Campbell the poet, who was to read his first discourse upon Poetry, which he had delivered at the Institution; he did so during that evening with very good effect [...] Poor Lewis was in a very bad humour, and did not know where to hide his head during the reading, so he pretended to be sleeping.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Campbell      

  

Guy de Maupassant : [tales: short stories]

'Absorbed as always in books, Willie read seriously in both French and German literature. His favourites in French were the "Maximes" of La Rochefoucauld, "La Princesse de Cleves" (which inspired his play "Caesar's Wife"), the tragedies of Racine, the novels of Voltaire, Stendhal's "Le Rouge et le Noir" and "La Chartreuse de Parme", Balzac's "Pere Goriot", Flaubert's "Madame Bovary", the works of Anatole France, the exotic tales of Pierre Loti and the well-crafted stories of Maupassant'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Somerset Maugham      Print: Book

  

John Henry, Cardinal Newman : [theological works]

'Brooks loved literature, and during their long walks together he introduced Willie to the most important contemporary English writers: the theological works of Cardinal Newman, the witty novels of George Meredith, the "Imaginary Portraits" of Pater, the rapturous poetry of Swinburne and Fitzgerald's sensual translation of "The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ellingham Brooks      Print: Book

  

George Meredith : [unknown]

'Brooks loved literature, and during their long walks together he introduced Willie to the most important contemporary English writers: the theological works of Cardinal Newman, the witty novels of George Meredith, the "Imaginary Portraits" of Pater, the rapturous poetry of Swinburne and Fitzgerald's sensual translation of "The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Ellingham Brooks      Print: Book

  

Thomas Campbell : discourse on English poetry and poets

Mary Berry, Journal, 9 March 1814: 'I dined with Madame de Stael; nobody but Campbell the poet, Rocca, and her own daughter [...] After dinner, Campbell read to us a discourse of his upon English poetry and upon some of the great poets. There are always signs of a poet critic and of genius in all he does, often encumbered by too ornate a style.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Campbell      

  

Magalotti : Travels of Cosmo III in England

Mary Berry, Journal, 27 March 1818: 'I went with the Comte Bardi to the Laurentian Library. Saw the travels (MSS.) of Cosmo III. in England in the year 167-, accompanied by Magalotti, who gives the description of the travels, and by an artist who made drawings of all the small towns where they stopped, and of all the country houses they saw. I remarked Wilton, Billingbear, Audley Inn, &c.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Berry      Manuscript: Unknown

  

John Milton : Paradise Regained

Mary Berry, Journal, 19 December 1818: 'Sir James Mackintosh in my room this morning; hearing me read over and commenting on my "Memoir of Lady Russell," spoke frankly, seemed pleased, and satisfied me very tolerably with his opinion [...] In the evening he read some of Milton's "Paradise Regained" to us.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sir James Mackintosh      Print: Book

  

William Smellie : The Philosophy of Natural History

'read Elements of Morality and Smellie'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Godwin      Print: Book

  

Mrs Somerville : [work on astronomy]

Mary Berry to 'Mrs Somerville', from Bellevue, September 1834: 'I have just finished reading your book [apparently on astronomy], which has [italics]entertained[end italics] me extremely, and at the same time, I hope, improved my moral character in the Christian virtue of humility [...] Humbled I must be, by finding my own intellect unequal to following, beyond a first step, the explanations by which you seek to make easy to comprehension the marvellous phenomena of the universe'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Berry      Print: Book

  

Victor Jaquemont : Letters describing a journey in India

Mary Berry to Thomas Babington Macaulay, 15 October 1834: 'Have they sent you among your books "Victor Jaquemont's Letters?" they are perfectly original [...] I never knew before half so much of the life of our countrymen in India; and the author himself is so natural and unaffected a character, that I had well-night cried at his death, as if it had not been true.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Berry      Print: Book

  

Mazzini : unknown

Mary Berry to a friend, [1841]: 'I have read every word of Mazzini, and agree entirely with him in his views of what civil liberty ought to be, and with most of his statements on the absence of it in Italy.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Berry      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : article on Frederick of Prussia

Lord Francis Jeffrey to Mary Berry, 23 April 1842 (in letter begun 22 April): 'I still read a good deal [...] I have just finished the last number of the "Edinburgh Review," and have been charmed more than ever, I think, with that splendid paper of Macaulay's on Frederic of Prussia. I have read it twice over already, with thrillings of admiration whcih make my very weak heart leap rather too strongly; but it is delightful.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Lord Francis Jeffrey      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : The History of England from the Accession of James the Second

Mary Berry to the Countess of Morley, 24 December 1848: 'Talking of Macaulay, I hope you have got his book, as the [italics]very[end italics] most entertaining reading I ever met with ... The first edition of 3,000 copies was sold in the first week; another, of 3,000 more, is to come out on Thursday next.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Berry      Print: Book

  

Sturm : unknown

'In ["Ciceronianus" (published 1577; delivered c.1575)] [...] Harvey says he has been for nearly twenty weeks in his Tusculan villa, i.e. at his father's house in Saffron Walden, assiduously studying not only the greatest of the old Roman writers, but renaissance writers such as Sturm, Manutius, Osorius, Sigonius and Buchanan. He had given more time to Cicero than to all the rest put together, yet sometimes he had dropped Cicero on Friendship to take up Osorius on Glory'.

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Gabriel Harvey      Print: Book

  

Desiderius Erasmus : Parabolae

'[Gabriel] Harvey no doubt has the incident [of Philip, Lord Surrey's 'attempts [...] on the virtue' of Harvey's sister Mercy, c. Christmas 1574] in mind when in his copy of Erasmus' "Parabolae" to the words "stultus magnifica fortuna iniucunda", he adds the notes, "you knowe, who vsed to write: 'Vnhappy Philip'."'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Gabriel Harvey      Print: Book

  

Richard Mant : unknown

'Palm Sunday Appropriate readings this week from Mant (?) [sic] &c.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Cole      Print: Book

  

Desiderius Erasmus : Parabolae

'[Erasmus's "Parabolae"] was acquired by [Gabriel] Harvey in 1566, read by him at some time thereafter, and was re-read in September of 1577.'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Gabriel Harvey      Print: Book

  

Desiderius Erasmus : Parabolae

'[Erasmus's "Parabolae"] was acquired by [Gabriel] Harvey in 1566, read by him at some time thereafter, and was re-read in September of 1577.'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Gabriel Harvey      Print: Book

  

Lord Henry Howard, Earl of Northampton : A Defensative against the poyson of supposed prophesies

'Throughout [Gabriel] Harvey's copy of [Lord Henry Howard's "A Defensative against the poyson of supposed prophesies"] are underlinings and comments [on the necessity of patience, Howard's work having contained attacks on Harvey's astrologer brother]'.

Century: 1500-1599 / 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Gabriel Harvey      Print: Book

  

Desiderius Erasmus : Works

'[Gabriel] Harvey's favourite books were read and annotated a number of times [...] at the conclusion of [his Erasmus] is a large inscription which reads: "Relegi mense Septembri. 1577: Gabriel Harveius".'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Gabriel Harvey      Print: Book

  

Lodovico Domenichi : Facetie, motti, et burle

'Lodovico Domenichi's "Facetie, motti, et burle" (1571) [an Italian collection of short miscellaneous observations and anecdotes] [...] stimulated Harvey to jot down [in its wide margins] a variety of musings and random philosophical reflections.'

Century: 1500-1599 / 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Gabriel Harvey      Print: Book

  

Niccolo Machiavelli : Discorsi ("First Decade")

'Despite [Gabriel] Harvey's dissatisfaction with his progress in Italian, in 1580 he managed to read the "First Decade" of Machiavelli's "Discorsi"'.

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Gabriel Harvey      Print: Book

  

Niccolo Machiavelli : The Arte of Warre

'[One] branch of [Gabriel] Harvey's marginalia [...] has to do with his study of the techniques of warfare. Extensive notes in this area are found in his copies of [...] Machiavelli (Peter Whitehorne's 1573 translation of the "Arte of Warre"), and Whitehorne's "Certaine wayes for the ordering of Soldiours" (1574).'

Century: 1500-1599     Reader/Listener/Group: Gabriel Harvey      Print: Book

  

Sir Roger Williams : unknown

Gabriel Harvey's favourite authors on warfare, listed in his copy of Machiavelli, "The Arte of Warre", after 1595: 'Mie principal Autors for Warr, after much reading, & long consideration: [...] For the Art, Vegetius, Machiavel & Sutcliff: for Stratagems, Gandino, & Ranzovius: for Fortification, Pyrotechnie, & engins, Tetti, & Digges [Stratioticos]: for the old Roman most worthie Discipline & Action, Caesar: for the new Spanish, & Inglish excellent Discipline & Action, Sir Ro[ger]: Williams.'

Century: 1500-1599 / 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Gabriel Harvey      Print: Book

  

James [?] Edmeston : The penny magazine

'On looking over "The Penny magazine" I met with the following useful piece by my friend James' [?Edmeston].

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Cole      Print: Serial / periodical

  

John Milton : Il Penseroso

'Mr. Perry tried upon us [at school in Norwich] the reading of L'Allegro and Il Penseroso; and it failed utterly [...] Not long after he was gone, I read both pieces in the nursery, one day; and straightway went into a transport, as if I had discovered myself in possession of a new sense.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mr Perry      Print: Book

  

John Milton : L'Allegro

'Mr. Perry tried upon us [at school in Norwich] the reading of L'Allegro and Il Penseroso; and it failed utterly [...] Not long after he was gone, I read both pieces in the nursery, one day; and straightway went into a transport, as if I had discovered myself in possession of a new sense.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mr Perry      Print: Book

  

John Milton : L'Allegro

'Mr. Perry tried upon us [at school in Norwich] the reading of L'Allegro and Il Penseroso; and it failed utterly [...] Not long after he was gone, I read both pieces in the nursery, one day; and straightway went into a transport, as if I had discovered myself in possession of a new sense.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Il Penseroso

'Mr. Perry tried upon us [at school in Norwich] the reading of L'Allegro and Il Penseroso; and it failed utterly [...] Not long after he was gone, I read both pieces in the nursery, one day; and straightway went into a transport, as if I had discovered myself in possession of a new sense.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Print: Book

  

Harriet Martineau : article on "Female Writers on Practical Divinity"

Harriet Martineau hears her first (pseudonymously) published work read by her unsuspecting eldest brother: 'After tea he said "[...] I will read you something"; and he held out his hand for the new "[Monthly] Repository." After glancing at it, he exclaimed, "They have got a new hand here. Listen." After a paragraph, he repeated, "Ah! this is a new hand; they have had nothing so good as this for a long while." [...] I was silent, of course.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Martineau      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Harriet Martineau : Devotional Exercises

Harriet Martineau on her early writings: 'I immediately after [the publication of her first periodical essay] began to write my first work, -- "Devotional Exercises," [...] I remember my brother's anxious doubting looks, as he read the M.S.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Martineau      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Harriet Martineau : My Servant Rachel

Harriet Martineau on one of her early publications: 'A most excellent young servant of ours [...] went out to Madeira with my brother and his family [...] Her history was a rather remarkable, and a very interesting one; and I wrote it in the form of four of Houlston's penny tracts. He threw together, and made a little book of them; and the heroine, who would never have heard of them as tracts, was speedily put in possession of her Memoirs in the form of the little book called "My Servant Rachel." An aunt of mine, calling on her one day, found her standing in the middle of the floor, and her husband reading the book over her shoulder.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Martineau family servant, and husband     Print: Book

  

Mrs Marcet : Conversations on Political Economy

'It was in the autumn of 1827, I think, that a neighbour lent my [Harriet Martineau's] sister Mrs. Marcet's "Conversations on Political Economy." I took up the book, chiefly to see what Political Economy precisely was; and great was my surprise to find that I had been teaching it unawares, in my stories about Machinery and Wages.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Print: Book

  

McCulloch : "Highlands and Islands of Scotland"

Harriet Martineau on reading for research toward her series of 'Tales', during 1832: 'The scenery was furnished by books of travel obtained from the Public Library [...] The books of travel were Lichtenstein's South Africa for "Life in the Wilds:" Edwards's (and others') "West Indies" for "Demerara;" and McCulloch's "Highlands and Islands of Scotland" for the two Garveloch stories.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Print: Book

  

Harriet Martineau : "Weal and Woe in Garveloch"

Harriet Martineau on her concerns about the acceptability of some of her writings: 'While writing "Weal and Woe in Garveloch," the perspiration many a time streamed down my face, though I knew there was not a line in it which might not be read aloud in any family. The misery arose from my seeing how the simplest statements and reasonings might and probably would be perverted [...] when the number was finished, I read it aloud to my mother and aunt [...] they were as complacent and easy as they had been interested and attentive.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      

  

Harriet Martineau : volume containing "Garveloch" stories

Harriet Martineau, on a response to her series of "Tales", denounced as 'improper' in the Quarterly Review, by a woman lent the 'Garveloch' stories by one of Martineau's friends: 'A few days after, [she] brought back the book, saying [...] it was so harmless that her husband had read it aloud to the young people in the evening [having been offered another] [...] The lady and her husband read the whole series through in this way, and never could find out the "improper book."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

Harriet Martineau : Series of Tales

Harriet Martineau, on a response to her series of "Tales", denounced as 'improper' in the Quarterly Review, by a woman lent the 'Garveloch' stories by one of Martineau's friends: 'A few days after, [she] brought back the book, saying [...] it was so harmless that her husband had read it aloud to the young people in the evening [having been offered another] [...] The lady and her husband read the whole series through in this way, and never could find out the "improper book."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon woman and husband     Print: Book

  

Louis-Marie Prudhomme : [unknown, possibly one of his French revolutionary works]

'S. reads Prud'homme aloud to us'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Percy Bysshe Shelley      Print: Book

  

John Moore : A Journal during a residence in France from August to December 1792

'Read some of Miss Bailey's plays - Tahourdin calls in the evening Shelley reads Moores journal aloud'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Percy Bysshe Shelley      Print: Book

  

William Drummond : Academical Questions

'Read Drummond'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Godwin      Print: Book

  

Lord Macartney : Journal of an Embassy to China

'read Embassy to China. finish it in the evening.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Godwin      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Of Education. To Master Samuel Hartlib

'in the evening Miltons letter to Mr Hartlib on educations'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Godwin      Print: Book

  

Harriet Martineau : Stories including "Cousin Marshall"

'[Elizabeth Fry] told me [Harriet Martineau] that her brother, J. J. Gurney, and other members of her family had become convinced by reading "Cousin Marshall" and others of my tales that they had been for a long course of years doing mischief where they meant to do good; that they were now convinced that the true way of benefiting the poor was to reform the Poor-law system'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: J. J. Gurney      Print: Unknown

  

Harriet Martineau : Stories including "Cousin Marshall"

'[Elizabeth Fry] told me [Harriet Martineau] that her brother, J. J. Gurney, and other members of her family had become convinced by reading "Cousin Marshall" and others of my tales that they had been for a long course of years doing mischief where they meant to do good; that they were now convinced that the true way of benefiting the poor was to reform the Poor-law system'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Family of Elizabeth Fry     Print: Unknown

  

Sir William Temple : [work on Holland]

Harriet Martineau, on research for a story on Bills of Exchange to be set either in Holland or South America: 'I thought Holland on the whole the more convenient of the two; so I dipped into some book about that country (Sir William Temple, I believe it was), picked out the two ugliest Dutch names I could find, made them into a firm, and boldly advertised them.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Print: Book

  

Maria Graham : unknown

Harriet Martineau, on her research for a story to be set in Ceylon: 'I gathered what I could from books, but really feared being obliged to give up a singularly good illustrative scene for want of the commonest facts concerning the social life of the Cingalese. I found scarcely anything even in Maria Graham and Heber. At this precise time, a friend happened to bring to my lodging [...] Sir Alexander Johnstone, who had just returned from governing Ceylon [...] Before we had known one another half an hour, I confided to him my difficulty. He started off [...] and was soon at the door again, with his carriage full of books, prints and other illustrations [...] Among the volumes he left with me was a Columbo almanack, which furnished me with names, notices of customs, and other valuable matters.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Print: Book

  

Harriet Martineau : Stories including "Cousin Marshall"

'Since reading "Cousin Marshall" and others of my Numbers, [Lord Henley] had dropped his subscriptions to some hurtful charities, and had devoted his funds to Education, Benefit Societies and Emigration.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Lord Henley      Print: Unknown

  

Juan de Mariana : History of Spain

To Miss Hunt, Bath Sept 27, 1794 'I have the great store of Spanish lately; the "Teatro Critico Universale" by Feyjoo, a very clever work in 14 volumes; and I am now reading post-haste [italics] Mariana's "History of Spain", of which I have only read half, but am determined to finish it before I go. It is not so interesting as some other histories, but one must know it.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Smith      Print: Book

  

Thomas James Mathias : The Pursuits of Literature

To Lady Isabella King, Bath March 8th 1798 'Have you read "The Pursuits of Literature"? It is a satirical poem. I dislike satire in general, but this appears to me one of the cleverest books I ever met with, and indeed this is the general opinion respecting it... I have read Robinson on the "Illuminati". It is said by people wel-informed on the subject to be a true representation.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Smith      Print: Book

  

R. Monckton Milnes : poems

'My [Harriet Martineau's] pleasure in [R. Monckton Milnes's poems] was greatest when I read them in my Tynemouth solitude. My copy is marked all over with hieroglyhics involving the emotions with which I read them.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Print: Book

  

Fanny Kemble : Journal

'I [Harriet Martineau] saw much of Fanny [Kemble] in America [...] She showed me the proof-sheets of her clever "Journal," and, as she chose to require my opinion of it, obtained a less flattering one than from most people [...] I was sufficiently shocked at certain passages to induce her to cancel some thirty pages.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Manuscript: proofs

  

Mrs Marsh : The Admiral's Daughter

'I [Harriet Martineau] was spending a couple of days at Mrs. Marsh's, when she asked me whether I would let her read to me "one or two little stories" which she had written. From her way of speaking of them, and from her devotion to her children [...] I concluded these to be children's stories. She ordered a fire in her room, and there we shut ourselves up for the reading. What she read was no child's story, but "The Admiral's Daughter." My amazement may be conceived. We were going to dine at the Wedgwoods': and a strange figure we must have cut there; for we had been crying so desperately that there was no concealing the marks of it.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mrs Marsh      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Mrs Marsh : Two Old Men's Tales (including The Admiral's Daughter)

'Mrs. Marsh asked me what I thought of getting her tales published. I offered to try if, on reading the manuscript at home, I thought as well of it ["The Admiral's Daughter"] as after her own most moving delivery of it. A second reading left no doubt in my mind; and I had the pleasure of introducing the "Two Old Men's Tales" to the world through Messrs. Saunders and Otley'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Harriet Martineau : Tales

'[S. T. Coleridge] told me [Harriet Martineau] that he (the last person whom I should have suspected) read my tales as they came out on the first of the month'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Frederika Bremer : Brothers and Sisters

'A neighbour lent me [Miss Bremer's] novel, "Brothers and Sisters," the first volume of which we thought admirable: but the latter part about Socialism, Mesmerism, and all manner of [italics]isms[end italics] which she did not understand, made us blush as we read.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau and neighbour     Print: Book

  

Conyeds Middleton : History of the life of Marcus Tullius Cicero

To Miss Hunt, December 12 1792 'The "Lusiad" I never read. It was Middleton's "Life of Cicero" that I meant. I was not tired with its length because the chief of its contents were new to me. I have lately undertaken Smollet's "History of England", but must leave it in the middle.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Smith      Print: Book

  

Tobias George Smolett : History of England

To Miss Hunt, December 12 1792 'The "Lusiad" I never read. It was Middleton's "Life of Cicero" that I meant. I was not tired with its length because the chief of its contents were new to me. I have lately undertaken Smollet's "History of England", but must leave it in the middle.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Smith      Print: Book

  

Thomas Moore : Lalla Rookh

The elderly Harriet Martineau reflects upon her altered reading capacity: 'I could not now read "Lalla Rookh" through before breakfast, as I did when it appeared. I cannot read new novels [...] while I can read with more pleasure than ever the old favourites, -- Miss Austen's and Scott's. My pleasure in Voyages and Travels is almost an insanity'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Print: Book

  

Homer : [poetry]

To Miss Hunt, July 7, 1792 'At present I am engaged in an argument with my dear Miss Bowdlen concerning Ossian. I support him against all other poets. You may easily guess who will say all I can for Ossian, for I really love [italics] his poems beyond all others. Milton must stand alone; but surely Ossian is in some respects [italics] superior to Homer.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Smith      Print: Book

  

John Milton : [poems]

To Miss Hunt, July 7, 1792 'At present I am engaged in an argument with my dear Miss Bowdlen concerning Ossian. I support him against all other poets. You may easily guess who will say all I can for Ossian, for I really love [italics] his poems beyond all others. Milton must stand alone; but surely Ossian is in some respects [italics] superior to Homer.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Smith      Print: Book

  

John Milton : [poems]

'At other times we studied Shakespeare, Milton and some other English poets as well as some of the Italians. We took long walks and often drew from nature. We read with great attention the whole of the New Testament, Secker's lectures on the Catechism and several other books on the same important subjects.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Smith      Print: Book

  

Zimmerman : Einsamkert

To Miss Hunt, April 7 1794 'I am very rich in German books right now for Dr Randolph, who has a great many, has given me his entire library, to take whatever I like. I have got your friend Kliest, which I think delightful; Hallen's poems; and Zimmerman's "Einsamkert", which pleases me more that [sic] almost any book I ever read... There are some ideas in Zimmerman's upon a future state very like your book [Essay on the happiness of the life to come].'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Smith      Print: Book

  

Harriet Martineau : work on Toussaint L'Ouverture

Harriet Martineau, on plans for, and execution of, her work on Toussaint L'Ouverture: 'I went to my confidante, with a sheetful of notes, and a heartful of longings to draw that glorious character [...] But my friend could not see the subject as I did [...] I gave it up; but a few years after, when ill at Tynemouth, I reverted to my scheme and fulfilled it; and my kind adviser, while never liking the subject in an artistic sense, graciously told me that the book had kept her up, over her dressing-room fire, till three in the morning.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

Harriet Martineau : Stories including "Ella of Garveloch"

'At a concert at the Hanover Square Rooms, some time before [Queen Victoria's accession] (I forget what year it was) the Duchess of Kent sent Sir John Conroy to me [Harriet Martineau] with a message of acknowledgement of the usefulness of my books to the Princess [Victoria]: and I afterwards heard more particulars of the eagerness with which the little lady read the stories on the first day of the month [...] Her "favourite" of my stories is "Ella of Garveloch."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Princess Victoria      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Harriet Martineau : Retrospect of Western Travel

'[A friend] one day desired to be allowed to see and criticise the first chapter of my [Harriet Martineau's] "Retrospect of Western Travel." I gave him the MS. at night; and in the morning he produced it, covered with pencil marks.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Harriet Martineau : articles on Household Education

Harriet Martineau to 'Mr Atkinson', 21 November 1847: 'I saw a sort of scared smile on Mrs. ----'s face the other day, when in talking about education, I said we had yet to see what could be done by a direct appeal to human nature. She, liberal as she is, thinks we have such active bad tendencies [...] that we can do nothing without [...] Help. Yet she, and Mrs. ---- too, devours my Household education papers, as if she had never met with anything true before on that subject.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Unknown

  

Harriet Martineau : Deerbrook

Charlotte Bronte (writing as Currer Bell) to Harriet Martineau, 7 November 1849: 'When C.B. first read "Deerbrook" he tasted a new and keen pleasure [...] "Deerbrook" ranks with the writings that have really done him good, added to his stock of ideas, and rectified his views of life.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charlotte Bronte      Print: Book

  

Harriet Martineau : Household Education

'"Currer Bell" [Charlotte Bronte] told me [Harriet Martineau] that she had read with astonishment those parts of "Household Education" which relate my own experience. It was like meeting her own [?]fetch'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charlotte Bronte      Print: Book

  

Harriet Martineau : Letter to Assistant poor-law Commissioner

'I [Harriet Martineau] wrote a letter [...] to an Assistant Poor-law Commissioner, who was earnest in his endeavours to get workhouses supplied with milk and vegetables, by the labour of the inmates on the land. To my amazement, I found my letter in the "Times," one day while I was at Bolton.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Print: Newspaper

  

Harriet Martineau : Letter

Harriet Martineau on the death of a Town Missionary acquaintance of hers: 'A friend of his at Birmingham wrote to me that he declared himself dying [of consumption] [...] she immediately wrote to suggest to me that a letter from me would gratify him. There was scarcely anything I would rather have done [Martineau having abandoned her Christian faith]: but it was impossible to refuse. I wrote at once [...] There was not a word about the future, or God, or even Christ. It was a letter of sympathy in his benevolent and happy life, and also, of course, in his present weakness. It reached him on the last day of his life. It was read to him. When he a little revived, he asked for it, and read it himself; and then desired his wife to tell all who loved him of "ths last flush on his darkness."'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Manuscript: Letter

  

Harriet Martineau : Letter

Harriet Martineau on the death of a Town Missionary acquaintance of hers: 'A friend of his at Birmingham wrote to me that he declared himself dying [of consumption] [...] she immediately wrote to suggest to me that a letter from me would gratify him. There was scarcely anything I would rather have done [Martineau having abandoned her Christian faith]: but it was impossible to refuse. I wrote at once [...] There was not a word about the future, or God, or even Christ. It was a letter of sympathy in his benevolent and happy life, and also, of course, in his present weakness. It reached him on the last day of his life. It was read to him. When he a little revived, he asked for it, and read it himself; and then desired his wife to tell all who loved him of "ths last flush on his darkness."'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Manuscript: Letter

  

Harriet Martineau and H.G. Atkinson : Letters on the Laws of Man's Nature and Development

Charlotte Bronte to Harriet Martineau, on Martineau's published correspondence with Atkinson: 'Having read your book, I cannot now think it will create any outcry. You are tender of others: -- you are serious, reverent and gentle.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Charlotte Bronte      Print: Book

  

Auguste Comte : unknown

Harriet Martineau on the inspirations for her project of translating Comte: 'I obtained something like a clear preparatory view, at second-hand, from a friend [...] What I learned then [...] impelled me to study the great book for myself; and in the spring of 1851 [...] I got the book, and set to work. I had meantime looked at Lewes's chapter on Comte in Mr. Knight's Weekly Volume, and at Littre's epitome'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Print: Book

  

Auguste Comte : unknown

'On the 8th of May [1851], I [Harriet Martineau] went for a fortnight to stay with some friends, between whom and myself there was cordial affection, though they were Swedenborgians [Martineau had renounced her Christian religion] [...] [The host's wife] came to my writing-table, to beg the loan of the first volume [of Auguste Comte, which Martineau was translating], when I was going out for a walk. When her daughter and I returned from our walk [...] the whole affair was settled. She [...] had decided that Comte knew nothing. I inquired in amazement the grounds for this decision. She had glanced over the first chapter, and could venture to say that she now "knew all about it."'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

Harriet Martineau : Mary and her Grandmother

Maria Weston Chapman on Harriet Martineau's story 'Mary and her Grandmother': 'I found it in the [italics]mansarde[end italics] of a Paris friend, and stood reading on the spot where I took it up, without the least idea of its authorship. It seemed like a Sunday-school book, but how different from its class in general!'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Maria Weston Chapman      Print: Book

  

Harriet Martineau : article

Lord Durham to Harriet Martineau, 1 January 1834: 'I have read your excellent paper with great pleasure'.

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Lord Durham      

  

Harriet Martineau : Retrospect

Harriet Martineau, Journal, 10 September 1837: 'Read to Mrs ---- my last chapters of my first volume of "Retrospect." She says the book will do.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      

  

Charles Lamb : Letters

Harriet Martineau, Journal, 24 September 1837: 'Revelled in Lamb's letters. What an exquisite specimen is that man of our noble, wonderful, frail humanity!'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Print: Book

  

Harriet Martineau : article on Sedgwick

Harriet Martineau, Journal, 24 September 1837: '[italics]Evening[end italics] Read [...] to my mother [...] my Sedgwick article, which she likes.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      

  

Beaumont : Marie

Harriet Martineau, Journal, 12 October 1837: 'Read some of Beaumont's "Marie." Sentimental and un-American'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Print: Unknown

  

Ralph Waldo Emerson : oration

Harriet Martineau, Journal, 7 November 1837: 'Read Waldo Emerson's oration. Though fanciful, it has much truth and beauty. It moved, roused, soothed and consoled me.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Print: Book

  

Lord Brougham : speech on education

Harriet Martineau, Journal, late November 1837: 'Read some of Brougham's education speech, but not all; so have no judgement to give.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      

  

Harriet Martineau : Loom and Lugger

Harriet Martineau, Journal, 16 December 1837: 'Morning, read one of my own stories, -- "Loom and Lugger." Was quite disappointed in it. It has capital material, but is obscure, and not simple enough.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      

  

Moliere : Les Precieuses Ridicules

Harriet Martineau, Journal, 10 January 1838: 'Read "Les Precieuses Ridicules," which did not amuse me very much; though acted I can fancy it capital.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Print: Book

  

Harriet Martineau : unknown

Harriet Martineau, Journal, 6 February 1838: '[At Captain Beaufort's] Met [...] C. Darwin, Mr. F. Edgeworth, and Mr. Hamilton, brother-in-law of the Duke of Wellington, who had been reading my book up to dinner-time, and took a good gaze at me.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Hamilton      Print: Book

  

Harriet Martineau : Deerbrook

Sir Arthur Helps to the publisher Macmillan, 'I have lately re-read "Deerbrook" with exceeding delight.'

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Sir Arthur Helps      Print: Book

  

Patrick Murphy : The Weather Almanack, 1838-39

'Trade very dull - weather very wet and rather windy as predicted by Murphy'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Jenkinson      Print: Book, almanac

  

Thom : account of "Oxford Movement"

Harriet Martineau, Journal, 4 January 1840: 'Read Mr. Thom's account of the Oxford theology, drawn from their own writings: good [...] Have been reading Wilberforce: grows twaddling in his old age, through want of cultivation of mind. Very noble, however, -- his keeping back Brougham's pledge about the Queen, and silently suffering universal censure.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Martineau      Print: Unknown

  

Harriet Martineau : The Hour and the Man (vol. I)

Lord Jeffrey to 'Mr. Empson', December 1840: 'I have read Harriet [Martineau]'s first volume [of "The Hour and the Man"], and give in my adhesion to her Black Prince [Toussaint L'Ouverture] with all my heart and soul. The book is really not only beautiful and touching, but [italics]noble[end italics]; and I do not recollect when I have been more charmed, whether by very sweet and eloquent writing and glowing description, or by elevated as well as tender sentiments. I do not believe that the worthy people ever spoke or acted as she has so gracefully presented them, and must confess that in all the striking scenes I entirely forgot their complexion, and drove the notion of it from me as often as it occurred. But this does not at all diminish, but rather increases the merit of her creations.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Francis Jeffrey      Print: Book

  

Harriet Martineau : The Hour and the Man

Florence Nightingale to Jane Martineau, 29 June 1876: 'I have thought of "The Hour and the Man" as the finest historical romance in any language. You would wonder if you knew how often I have read it over and over again, even in the last two years.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Florence Nightingale      Print: Book

  

Harriet Martineau : Life in the Sickroom

From letter of Elizabeth B. Ker, niece of Harriet Martineau: 'I regret infinitely that she desired all her letters to be destroyed. I had so large a boxful that it took some time to read and burn them [...] on reading that most charming of all her publications, "Life in the Sick-Room" [...] I said, "Oh, but I have read it all before! -- this is only my burnt letters!"'

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth B. Ker      Print: Book

  

Felicia Dorothea Browne Hemans : Bring flowers

[Transcribed into a ms volume] Title 'Lines by Mrs Hemans'; Text 'Bring flowers, young flowers, for the festal board/ To wreathe the cup ere the wine is poured;/ Bring flowers! they are springing in wood and vale,/ Their breath floats out on the southern gale; ...' [total = 6 x 6 lines verses]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Magdalene Sharpe- Erskine      Print: Unknown

  

Anonymous : The season of death

[Item transcribed into commonplace book]: Title = 'The season of death' Text = 'Leaves have their time to fall/ And flowers to wither at the north wind's breath/And stars to set - but all/ Thou hast all seasons for thine own, oh Death ...' (total - 5 x 4 line verses)

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Magdalene Sharpe- Erskine      Print: Unknown

  

Mary Humphrey Ward : The History of David Grieve

'One of them asked me if I was fond of reading and told me that she herself wrote books and was staying in the neighbourhood hoping to include the dale in her next book. Many years afterwards I read "The History of David Grieve" and at once remembered our visitor. Comparing dates I realised it was Mrs. Humphry Ward, seeking the atmosphere of the wild valley she described so well.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Hannah Mitchell      Print: Book

  

Georg Eberhard Rumphius : Herbarium Amboinensis

'The growth of the Rhizophora also pleased me much, although I had before a very good idea of it from Rumphius, who has a very good figure of the tree in his Herb. Amboin. [v. iii. tab. 71, 72]'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Banks      Print: Book

  

Hulme : [book with medical directions]

'About a fortnight ago my gums swelled, and some small pimples rose on the inside of my mouth, which threatened to become ulcers; I flew to the lemon juice, which had been put up for me according to Dr. Hulme's method, described in his book, and in his letter, which is inserted here.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Banks      Print: Book

  

Georg Eberhard Rumphius : Herbarium Amboinensis

'Browne, in his "History of Jamaica" mentions three species whose roots, he says, are used to dye a brown colour; and Rumphius says of his Bancudus angustifolia, which is very nearly allied to our nono, that it is used by the inhabitants of the East Indian Islands as a fixing drug for the colour of red, with which he says it particularly agrees.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Banks      Print: Book

  

Alexander Dalrymple : An Account of the Discoveries made in the South Pacifick Ocean, previous to 1764

'He was covered with a fine cloth of a manufacture totally new to us; it was tied on exactly as represented in Mr. Dalrymple's book, p. 63; his hair was also tied in a knot on the top of his head, but there was no feather stuck in it; his complexion brown but not very dark.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Banks      Print: Book

  

Abel Jansen Tasman : [unknown]

'The men in these boats were dressed much as they are represented in Tasman's figure, that is, two corners of the cloth they wore were passed over their shoulders and fastened to the rest of it just below their breasts; but few or none had feathers in their hair.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Banks      Print: Book

  

Joseph Macabe : The Religion of Women

'Fortunately for me, about this time I read two books by Joseph Macabe, an ex-Catholic priest, "The Religion of Women" and "Women in Political Evolution", which I still think are the finest ever written on the subject. They are like a film showing women's life throughout the ages, our faults and our virtues, and the economic reasons for our inferiority before the law.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hannah Mitchell      Print: Book

  

Joseph Macabe : Women in Political Evolution

'Fortunately for me, about this time I read two books by Joseph Macabe, an ex-Catholic priest, "The Religion of Women" and "Women in Political Evolution", which I still think are the finest ever written on the subject. They are like a film showing women's life throughout the ages, our faults and our virtues, and the economic reasons for our inferiority before the law.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Hannah Mitchell      Print: Book

  

Felicia Hemans : The voice of spring

[Item transcribed into a commonplace book]: Title = 'The Voice of Spring'; Text = 'I come, I come ! ye have call'd me long;/ I come o'er the mountains with light and song!/ Ye may trace my steps o'er the wakening earth,/ By the winds which tell of the violet's birth ...' (total = 7 x 6 line verses)

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Magdalene Sharpe- Erskine      Print: Unknown

  

[Thomas] [Moore] : [The Blue Stocking]

[Item transcribed into a commonplace book]: Untitled; Text = 'To sigh, yet feel no pain; /To weep - yet scarce know why/ To sport an hour with Beauty's chain/ Then throw it idly be ... ' [total = 2 x 10 line verses]

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Magdalene Sharpe- Erskine      Print: Unknown

  

[James?] Montgomery : Night

[Item transcribed into a commonplace book]: Title = 'Night'; Text 'Night is the time for rest/ How sweet, when labors close/ To gather round an aching breast/ The curtain of repose ...'[total= 6x 6line verses]

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Magdalene Sharpe- Erskine      Print: Unknown

  

Ethel Mannin : Green Willow

'Followed by the thought that, had I not been reading Ethel Mannin's "Green Willow", which gives a vivid description of this development, perhaps I would not have taken sides.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

Thomas Medwin : Journal of the Conversations of Lord Byron

'She [Lady Caroline Lamb] wrote at length to defend herself to [Thomas] Medwin, whom she treats respectfully, though she had told [John Cam] Hobhouse that it would have been better to publish Byron's journal rather than burn it, for Medwin's book [Journal of the Conversations of Lord Byron] was "full of vulgarity & erros--even as to dates"'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Caroline Lamb      Print: Book

  

Thomas Medwin : Journal of the Conversations of Lord Byron

'With the most intense interest I have just finished your Book which does you credit as to the manner in which it is executed, and after the momentary pain in part which it excites in many a bosom, will live in despight [sic] of censure and be gratefully accepted by the Public as long as Lord Byron's name is remembered--yet as you have left to one who adored him a little legacy and as I feel secure the lines "remember thee-thou false to him then friend time"--were his--and as I have been very ill I am not likely to trouble any one much longer--you will I am sure grant me one favour--let me to you at least confide the truth of the past--you owe it to me--you will not I know refuse me [...] Still I love him [Byron]--witness the agony I experienced at his death & the tears your book has cost me. Yet, Sir, allow me to say, although you have unitentionally given me pain I had rather have experienced it than not have read your book. Parts of it are beautiful, and I can vouch for the truth of much as I read his own memoirs before Murray burnt them.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Caroline Lamb      Print: Book

  

Thomas Medwin : ournal of the Conversations of Lord Byron

'pray have you read Medwin's Book--the part respecting me gives me much pain--this is strange--why need I care--I do however [...]'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Caroline Lamb      Print: Book

  

Bronislaw Malinowski? : [unknown]

'Our own attitude and our feeling of amateur enterprise have been summed up by Professor Bronislaw Malinowski, who in our first year's "Report" (Lindsay Drummond, 1938) describes how he first met one of us reading a paper to the Institute of Sociology.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: unknown      Manuscript: Sheet, Academic paper

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

'Twould make a Paradise of Hell-- & fill even Heaven itself with woe[...]'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Caroline Lamb      

  

[Felicia Dorothea Browne] [Hemans] : The grave of a poetess

[Item transcribed into a commonplace book]: [Title] 'The grave of a poetess (Mrs` Tighe at Woodstock near Kilkenny)'; [text] 'I stood beside thy lowly grave;/ Spring-odours breath'd around/ And music, in the river-wave/ pass'd with a lulling sound ...' [total = 13 x 4 lines verses]

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Magdalene Sharpe- Erskine      Print: Unknown

  

H. Smith : Country and Town

[Item transcribed into a commonplace book]: [Title] 'Country and Town [by] H. Smith'; [Text] 'Horrid, in country shades to dwell!/ One positively might as well/ be buried in the quarries/ No earthly object to be seen/ but cows and geese upon the green/ As sung by Captain Morris...' [total = 6 x 6 line verses]

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Magdalene Sharpe- Erskine      Print: Unknown

  

Thomas Moore : 'Gazel'

[transcription of Moore's poem 'Gazel' in what seems to be Lady Caroline's Hand]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Caroline Lamb      

  

Alphonse Marie Louis de Lamartine : [L'Homme]

[Item transcribed into a commonplace book]: Title 'Address to Lord Byron by Dr Lamartine'; [Text] 'Toi, dont le monde encore ignore le vrai nom/ Esprit mysterieux, mortel ou demon/...' [total = 58 lines]

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Magdalene Sharpe- Erskine      Print: Unknown

  

Thomas Moore : [unknown]

[Item transcribed into a commonplace book]: [ Untitled]; [Text] 'In the morning of life when its cares are unknown/ and its pleasures in all their new lustre begin/ When we live in a bright beaming world of our own/ And the light that surrounds us is all from within/ ... [by] Moore' [total = 3 x 8 line verses]

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Magdalene Sharpe- Erskine      Print: Unknown

  

Felicia Dorothea Browne Hemans : The illuminated city

[Item transcribed into a commonplace book]: [Title] 'The Illuminated City' ; [Text] 'The hills all glow'd with a festive light/ For the Royal city rejoiced by night/ ... [by] Mrs Hemans' [total = 5 x 8 line verses]

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Magdalene Sharpe- Erskine      Print: Unknown

  

Felicia Dorothea Browne Hemans : The forest sanctuary

[Item transcribed into a commonplace book]: [Title] 'From the Forest Sanctuary'; [Text] 'But the dark hours wring forth the hidden might/ Which hath lain bedded in the silent soul/ A treasure all undreamed of ; - as the night/ ... [by] Mrs Hemans' [total = 8 x 9 line verses, probably not a continuous extract]

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Magdalene Sharpe- Erskine      Print: Unknown

  

Thomas Moore : My Birthday

[Item transcribed into a commonplace book]: [Title] 'My Birthday [by] Moore'; [Text] 'My Birthday! what a different sound/ That word had in my youthful years!/ And how each time the day comes round/ Less and less white[?] the ? appears/ ?'; [total = 28 lines]

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Magdalene Sharpe- Erskine      Print: Unknown

  

Thomas Moore : To my mother

[Item transcribed into a commonplace book]: [Title] 'To my mother [by] Moore'; [Text] 'They tell us of an Indian tree/ Which howso'er the sun and sky/ May tempt its boughs to wander free/ And shoot and blossom wide and high?'; [total = 12 lines plus a 2 line quote]. [Quote Titled] 'Comfort for the loss of Friends'; [Text] 'My gems are fast falling away, but I do hope & trust/ it is because "God is making up his jewels"/ Charles Wolfe'

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Magdalene Sharpe- Erskine      Print: Unknown

  

William Dampier : "Voyage Round the World" or "Voyage to New Holland"

'Having now, I believe, fairly passed through between New Holland and New Guinea, and having an open sea to the westward, so that to-morrow we intend to steer more to the northwards in order to make the south coast of New Guinea, it seems high time to take leave of New Holland, which I shall do by summing up the few observations I have been able to make on the country and people. I much wished, observing the people, as they differ so much from the account that Dampier (the only man I know of who has seen them besides us) has given of them: he indeed saw them on a part of the coast very distant from where we were, and consequently the people might be different; but I should rather conclude them to be the same, chiefly from having observed an universal confomity in such of their customs as came under my observation in the several places we landed upon during the run along the coast. Dampier in general seems to be a faithful relater; but in the voyage in which he touched on the coast of New Holland he was in a ship of pirates; possibly himself not a little tainted by their idle examples, he might have kept no written journal of anything more than the navigation of the ship, and when upon coming home he was solicited to publish an account of his voyage, may have referred to his memory for many particulars relating to the people, etc. These Indians, when covered with their filth, which I believe they never wash off, are, if not coal black, very near it. As negroes, then, he might well esteem them, and add the woolly hair and want of two front teeth in consequence of the similitude in complexion between these and the natives of Africa; but from whatever cause it might arise, certain it is that Dampier either was very much mistaken in his account, or else saw a very different race of people from those we have seen.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Banks      Print: Book

  

William Dampier : "Voyage round the world" or "Voyage to New Holland"

'This I should suppose to be the gum mentioned by Dampier in his voyage round the world, and by him compared with "Sanjuis draconis", as possibly also that which Tasman saw upon Van Diemen's Land, where he says he saw gum on the trees, and gum lac on the ground.' (See his voyage in a collection published at London in 1694, p. 133)

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Banks      Print: Book

  

Abel Janszoon Tasman : [unknown]

'This I should suppose to be the gum mentioned by Dampier in his voyage round the world, and by him compared with "Sanjuis draconis", as possibly also that which Tasman saw upon Van Diemen's Land, where he says he saw gum on the trees, and gum lac on the ground.' (See his voyage in a collection published at London in 1694, p. 133)

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Banks      Print: Book

  

Georg Eberhard Rumphius : Herbarium Aboinense

'When first we found the tree, we of course gathered the branches, and were surprised to find our hands instantly covered with legions of these small animals, who stung most intolerably; experience, however, taught us to be more careful for the future. Rhumphius mentions a similar instance to this in his "Herbarium Amboinense", vol. ii. p. 257; his tree, however, does not at all resemble ours.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Banks      Print: Book

  

Georg Eberhard Rumphius : Herbarium Aboinense

'The chief inconvenience in handling the roots came from the infinite number; myriads would come in an instant out of many holes, and running over the hand tickle so as to be scarcely endurable. Rhumphius has an account of this very bulb and its ants in vol. vi. p.120, where he describes also another sort, the ants of which are black.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Banks      Print: Book

  

William Dampier : "Voyage round the world" or "Voyage to New Holland"

'All the shoals that were dry at half ebb afforded plenty of fish, left dry in small hollows of the rocks, and a profusion of large shell-fish (Chama gigas) such as Dampier describes, vol. iii. p. 191.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Banks      Print: Book

  

William Dampier : "Voyage round the world" or "Voyage to New Holland"

'In the evening a small bird of the noddy (Sterna) kind hovered about the ship, and at night settled on the rigging, where it was taken, and proved exactly the same bird as Dampier has described, and given a rude figure of, under the name of a noddy from New Holland (see his Voyages, vol. iii. p. 98, table of birds, Fig. 5).'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Banks      Print: Book

  

Georg Eberhard Rumphius : Herbrium Aboinensis

'Authors tell strange stories about the immense size to which this fruit grows in some countries which are favourable to it. Rumphius says that they are sometimes so large that a man cannot easily lift one of them: the Malays told me that at Madura they were so large that two men could but carry one of them; at Batavia, however, they never exceed the size of a large melon, which in shape they resemble, but are coated over with angular spines like the shootings of some crystals: they are, however, soft, and do not at all prick any one who handles them.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Banks      Print: Book

  

Ernest Raymond : [various titles]

' "Well, because I do like Ernest Raymond's books and I read all of them as far as I can." '

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

Ann Temple : [unknown]

'My life is serious enough without worrying over things like that, so I don't read the papers-only read d'Alroy and Ann Temple. Anyhow-if there's a war I shall be in it, so it doesn't make any difference.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[Felicia Dorothea Browne] [Hemans] : [Kindred hearts]

[Item transcribed into a commonplace book]: [Untitled]; [Text]' ?Oh! ask not, hope not thou too much/ of sympathy below/ For are the hearts whence one same touch/ Bids the sweet fountains flow/ ?' [total = 16 lines but not a continuous extract]

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Magdalene Sharpe- Erskine      Print: Unknown

  

John Malcolm : [untitled]

[Item transcribed into a commonplace book]: [Untitled]; [Text] 'Oh that I had the wings of a dove/ that I might flee away and be at rest/ So prayed the Psalmist to be free/ From mortal bond and earthly thrall/ And such, or soon, or late, shall be/ Full oft the heart breathed [?] prayer of all/ ?' [total = 4 x 8 lines verses follow the 2 line quote]

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Magdalene Sharpe- Erskine      Print: Unknown

  

Felicia Dorothea Browne Hemans : [untitled]

[Item transcribed into a commonplace book]: [Untitled]; [Text]' ? Now I feel/ What high prerogatives belong to Death/ He hath a deep, though voiceless eloquence, /To which I leave my ? His solemn veil/ ... Mrs Hemans' [total = 12 lines]

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Magdalene Sharpe- Erskine      Print: Unknown

  

John Mackintosh : Adieu

[Item transcribed into a commonplace book]: [Title] 'Adieu/ John Mackintosh/ The earnest student'; [Text] 'Adieu to God what words can else express/ The parting, and the prayer that soars to heaven/ When two fond hearts, long link'd in ternderness/ By the decree of fate at length are riven/ ...'; [Total = 12 lines]

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Magdalene Sharpe- Erskine      Print: Unknown

  

Anonymous : [untitled]

[Item transcribed into a commonplace book]: [Untitled]; [Text] 'Weep not, tho' lonely and wild be thy path/ And the storm may be gathering round/ There is one ! who can shield from the hurricane's wrath/ and that one! may for ever be found;/ ... (Anonymous)'; [Total = 3 x 8 line verses]

Century: 1800-1849 / 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Magdalene Sharpe- Erskine      Print: Unknown

  

Somerset Maughan : [unknown]

Letter 271 4 July 1940 'Please forgive me not having written eight and a half days ago or more to thank you for your lovely birthday present. The thin mints went of course in twenty four hours, and I curled up on a sofa with Somerset Maugham until I had finished him. It was a new one to me and marvellously disagreeable and exciting! So acid it nearly burnt!'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Peter Pears      Print: Book

  

Homer : The Iliad

'On the penult of the year 1819 I reached the last line of the "Iliad". To speak of the merits of the Maeonian Bard from one perusal only may be deemed presumption - yet I may be allowed to say that my Enjoyment fell far short of Expectation. I found, & I am ashamed to say it, little to please and much to offend- The Morals of his Divinities are those of St Giles- their language that of Billingsgate or Wapping- His Nestors are garrulous beyond endurance...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Mitchell      Print: BookManuscript: Letter

  

[Brothers] Grimm : [Fairy Tales]

'So in time she was able to read Grimms' "Fairy Tales", "Gulliver's Travels", "The Daisy Chain" and Mrs. Molesworth's "Cuckoo Clock" and "Carrots".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Flora Thompson      Print: Book

  

M.L. Molesworth : Cuckoo Clock

'So in time she was able to read Grimms' "Fairy Tales", "Gulliver's Travels", "The Daisy Chain" and Mrs. Molesworth's "Cuckoo Clock" and "Carrots".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Flora Thompson      Print: Book

  

M.L. Molesworth : Carrots

'So in time she was able to read Grimms' "Fairy Tales", "Gulliver's Travels", "The Daisy Chain" and Mrs. Molesworth's "Cuckoo Clock" and "Carrots".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Flora Thompson      Print: Book

  

Jerningham : 'Poems on Various Subjects' or 'Fugitive Poetical Pieces' or poems separately published.

'Besides their own Family we met Mr Jerningham, the Poet. I have lately been reading his poems,- if [italics] his [close italics] they may be called, for he never writes 3 lines following of which one is not borrowed,-he has not a thought, a phrase, an [italics] epithet [close italics] that is not palpably stolen!- He seems a mighty delicate Gentleman, - he looks to be [italics] painted, [close italics] & is all daintification, in manner, speech and Dress.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Frances Burney      Print: Book

  

Dimitri Merejkowski : The Forerunner, the romance of Leonardo da Vinci

'I would like you to read a little book called "The Forerunner", by Merejkowski, published by Constable. It is about Leonardo da Vinci, and though there is a lot of bosh in it, I think there is a fine idea running through it - half formed, and somewhat elusive, but nevertheless to a certain extent true.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Donald William Alers Hankey      Print: Book

  

Friedrich Mohs : Crystalography

'Nothing material has occurred to me since I returned from Mainhill. I wrote the first half of "Hunsteen" and translated, from the German, the first half of "Mohs";'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carlyle      Print: Book

  

Jean Charles Leonard Simonde de Sismondi : unknown history

'Having just concluded the first volume of Sismondi's history, and the other not being yet arrived from Edinr, I think I cannot better employ the hour of leisure, which necessarily intervenes between the end of this and the beginning of a fresh employment, than in returning you my thanks for the kind and good-humoured letter which I received last Saturday.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Carlyle      Print: Book

  

Hannah More : Practical Piety

'I return to my Letter writing from calling on Miss Harriot Webb [...] She appears well pleased with her new Home - & they are all reaidng with delight Mrs H. More's recent publication.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriot Webb      Print: Book

  

Thomas Moore : Lalla Rookh

'When Wordsworth was then spoken of as a great poet, the ordinary question was, "Why is he not more popular?" The process through which public opinion gradually turns from an ephemeral popularity, permanently to repose upon works of imagination that are not extravagent stimulants, is admirably illustrated by his own experience. I remember distinctly, when "Lalla Rookh" first came out, I read it through at one sitting. To say I was delighted with it is a poor word for my feelings; I was transported out of myself-entranced or what you will.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Knight      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Charles James Blomfield : A Charge Delivered to the Clergy of his Diocese

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Francis Beaumont : The Dramatic Works

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

August Heinrich Matthiae : A Copious Greek Grammar

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Camden : Institutio graecae grammatices compendiaria

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Moses Mendelssohn : Morgenstunden oder Vorlesungun uber das Daseyn Got

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Johann Gebbard Ehrenreich Maass : Versuch uber die Einbildungskraft

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Thomas Thomson : A System of Chemistry

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Moses Mendelssohn : Philosophische Schriften

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Nicola Francesco Haym : Notizia de' libri rari viella lingua italiana

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Mary Lamb : Mrs Leicester's School: or, the history of several young ladies, related by themselves

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Edward Williams : Poems, Lyric and Pastoral

[Marginalia]

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Francis Wrangham : The Life of Dr. Richard Bentley

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Francis Wrangham : Scraps

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Friedrich Daniel Ernst Schleiermacher : A Critical Essay on the Gospel of St Luke

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Friedrich Daniel Ernst Schleiermacher : Ueber den sogenannten ersten Brief des Paulos

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Antoine Desmoulins : Histoire naturelle des races humaines

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

John and Michael Banim : Tales by the O'Hara Family

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Thomas Adam : Private Thoughts on Religion

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Robert Chambre : Some Animadversions upon the Declaration

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Alexander Chalmers : The Works of the English Poets from Chaucer to Cowper

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Alexander Chalmers : The Works of the English Poets from Chaucer to Cowper

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Alexander Chalmers : The Works of the English Poets from Chaucer to Cowper

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Hendrik Brenkmann : Historia Pandectarum

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Jakob Bohme : Works

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Francis Beaumont : Fifty Comedies and Tragedies

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

William Bartram : Travels Through North & South Carolina

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

anon [A Labour MP] : article

'I was reading an article by a Labour M.P. who wants to harbour refugees. He's all wrong. Good job we haven't got dictators here.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Unknown

  

Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann : Fantasiestucke in Calloti Manier

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Philippe de la Clyle, sire de Commines : The History of Philip de Commines

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Thomas W Dymock : England's Dust and Ashes Raked up

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Johann Friedrich Blumenbach : Uber die naturlichen Verschiedenheiten im Menschen

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Johann Friedrich Blumenbach : Uber die naturlichen Verschiedenheiten im Menschen

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Moses Mendelssohn : Jerusalem oder uber religiose Macht und Judenthum

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Benedetto Menzini : Poesie di Benedetto Menzini Fiorentino divise in due tomi

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Poems upon Several Occasions, English, Italian, and Latin

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

John Milton : A Complete Collection of the Historical, Political and Miscellaneous Works of John Milton

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Henry More : The Theological Works of the most pious and learned Henry More, DD Sometime Fellow of Christ's College in Cambridge

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Henry More : Philosophical Poems, etc

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Henry More : Observations upon Anthroposophia Theomagica, and Anima Magica abscondita

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Cotton Mather : Magnalia Christi Americana

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Bernard de Mandeville : The Fable of the Bees: or, private vices, publick benefits

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Friedrich Von Matthisson : Gedichte

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Friedrich Von Matthisson : Gedichte

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

John Smith : Select Discourses

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Henry More : The Second Lash of Alazonomastix

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Johann Gottfried Jakob Hermann : De emendenda ratione graecae grammaticae pars prim

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Friedrich Anton Mesmer : Mesmerismus

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Cesare Mussolini : Italian Exercises

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Thomas Robert Malthus : An Essay on the Principle of Population

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

John Macdiarmid : Lives of British Statesmen, & c

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

John Miller : Sermons Intended to Show a Sober Application Of Scriptural Principles To The Realities Of Life

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Thomas Robert Malthus : The Grounds of an Opinion on the Policy of Restricting the importation of foreign corn

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Charles Smith : Seven Letters on National Religion

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Philip Massinger : The Plays of Philip Massinger... with notes critic

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

S. Maxwell [potential pseudonym] : The Battle of the Bridge; or Pisa Defended

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Johann Friedrich Meckel : System des vergleichenden Anatomie

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Adolph Carl August Eschenmayer : Psychologie in drei Theilen

[Marginalia]

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Taylor Coleridge      Print: Book

  

Wiley and Putnam (eds) : Library of Choice Reading

'I well remember, and I sometimes think of it with tears, bringing to my lodgings Rollin's "Ancient History", in six volumes. I wanted something to read. I had no one to advise me to a course of reading, so I pitched on Rollin. Next I obtained a number of Wiley and Putnam's "Library of Choice Reading", and there I found essay, and biography, and history; but for the lack of a system, my reading was desultory. My time was soon fully occupied in speaking, day and night, in school-houses, vestries, and halls, so that the opportunities for intellectual culture were limited. Still, I read a great deal to small profit, owing to the lack of advantages, such as I might have obtained, by the training which an education would have imparted.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John B. Gough      Print: Book

  

Hannah More : Practical Piety

'I have been frightened from taking up Hannah More's last book which Fanny lent me, by the dread that it would more than ever convince me what a worthless wretch I am without giving me the virtue and courage to become better. But last night, wanting to compose my wayward spirit, I ventured to open it, and read the first chapter on Internal Christianity- And was agreeably suprised to find myself much pleased with it.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Sarah H. Burney      Print: Book

  

John Tomkins : Piety Promoted in Brief Memorials ... Society of F

'In the 9th mo. [1800] died Thos Rutter, of Bristol ... His amiable character is so ably pourtrayed [sic] in 142 & c of the 1oth part of "Piety Promoted", 43 that it is needless for me to attempt any farther delineation.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: James Jenkins      Print: Book

  

George Smith : A Sermon Delivered in the Parish Church of Sheffield

'Bought Mr Smith's "Sermon to the Odd Fellows", Professor Robinson's "Proof of a Conspiracy" seems to have made a deep impression on his mind. Price 6d. Bought also the "Oeconomist" for July; they have raised the price to 2d.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      

  

Donald Campbell : A Journey Over Land to India

'Brought Donald Campbell's "Journey Over Land to India" [from the Library]. We had a very high character given of it & the little I have read has not disapointed us.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Book

  

Donald Campbell : A Journey Over Land to India

'I finished D. Campbell's "Journey over land to India". It is divided into three parts ... the story of Mr [Alli?] who was shipwrecked and imprisoned with him is very affecting.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Book

  

James Montgomery : The Whisperer; or Tales & Speculations

'Finished the "Whisperer or Tales & Speculations" by Gabriel Silvertongue. It was written by J. Montgomery and part of it appeared in "The Iris" in the year 1795. All the pieces are very entertaining, in so much that I do not know which I prefer above the rest. Mr Evans gave it me [bought on July 15] together with "Prison Amusements & his Trial" [by Montgomery].'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Book

  

Johann Georg Zimmermann : Solitude, or the effect of Occasional Retirement

'Wrote out of Zimmerman on "Solitude" the introduction to it. [Notes that it is a 1797 edn when borrowed on 26 Aug. 1798].'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Book

  

Johann Georg Zimmermann : Solitude, or the effect of Occasional Retirement

'Took Zimmermann to the library [In margin: 'vestry']. It consists for the most part of declamation, tho' it is very instructive; I have not finishe'd it but it was time to return it.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Book

  

James Thomson : The Seasons

'Began to read Thomson's "Seasons".'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Book

  

Helen Maria Williams : A Tour in Switzerland

'Thought the following remarks in Miss Williams was exceeding applicable to the manufacturers of Sheffield: "There is a spirit in that class, in all countries more favourable to inquiry & consequently more hostile to unconditional submission" Vol 2 p.227.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Book

  

Hannah More : Sacred Dramas: Chiefly intended for Young Persons

'Brought Wolstonecraft's "View of the French Revolution", from the Chapel Library, for Miss Haynes to read. Read in Miss Hannah More's "Sacred Drama", David & Goliath, I was much pleased with it.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Book

  

Helen Maria Williams : A Tour in Switzerland

'Miss Williams "Tour" is very entertaining; besides describing the scenery (which she does in a masterly manner) she gives short sketches of the government of the different cantons & compares the state of Switzerland to Paris.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Book

  

Thomas Campbell : Lines Inscribed on the Monument Lately... Erected

'Lines written to the Memory of Sir G Campbell' 'To Him whose loyal, brave, and gentle heart/...'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Carey/Maingay group     Print: Unknown

  

[Thomas] [Moore?] : 'When Love was a Child' OR ['Loves Wreath']

'Love's Wreath!' 'When Love was a Child and went rolling along/...'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Carey/Maingay group     Print: Unknown

  

Thomas Moore : 'She is Far From the Land' [Irish Melodies]

'Lines written by Moore on Miss [Curria]' 'She is far from the Land, where her young Hero sleeps/...'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Carey/Maingay group     Print: Unknown

  

Susanna Blamire : 'When The Soft Tear Steals Silently'

'The Tear' 'When the soft tear steals silently from the eye/...'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Carey/Maingay group     Print: Unknown

  

Thomas Moore : 'Remember Thee' [from Irish Melodies]

'Remember thee yes while there's life in this heart/...'[Thomas Moore, 'Remember Thee': first 8 lines of 12-line text. Very little punctuation in transcript. Perhaps from song?]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Carey/Maingay group     Print: Unknown

  

James Montgomery : A Riddle

'A Riddle/which every reader may solve for herself/but none to another' 'I know not who these lines may see/I know not what these lines will be' [ll. 1-2]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Julia      Print: Unknown

  

Thomas Campbell : 'Hohenlinden' OR [The Pleasures of Hope]

'Battle of Hohenlinden' 'On Linden when the Sun was low/...'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Carey/Maingay group     Print: Unknown

  

Thomas Moore : Oh Thou Who Dry'st the Mourner's Tear

'Oh thou who driest the mourner's tear/...' 'Moore' [epigraph from Psalms not transcribed]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Carey/Maingay group     Print: Unknown

  

Thomas Moore : The Love of the Angels

'Extract from Moore's Love of the Angels' [The Second Angels Story, ll. 1043-1066]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Carey/Maingay group     Print: Unknown

  

Thomas Moore : 'They Tell us of An Indian Tree' OR 'To My Mother'

'They tell us of an Indian tree/...'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Margaret Maingay [?]      Print: Unknown

  

Thomas Campbell : The Pleasures of Hope

'A Fragment' 'And say when summoned from the world and thee/...' ['The Pleasures of Hope', part one, ll. 239-248. Some changes in punctuation]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Carey/Maingay group     Print: Unknown

  

James Montgomery : [The West Indies] OR 'Home'

'Lines written by Montgomery on Home' 'There is a spot of earth...'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Carey/Maingay group     Print: Unknown

  

Thomas Moore : Lalla Rookh

'There's a bliss beyond all the Minstrel has told/...' ['Light of the Haram' ll. 648-655]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Carey/Maingay group     Print: Unknown

  

Johann Beckmann : A History of Inventions and Discoveries

'Took Beckman's "History of Inventions" to the Library; I have been very much entertained with it. Brought the "Gent. Mag" for 1793.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Book

  

John Home : Douglas: A Tragedy

'Read Home's "tragedy of Douglas", I was much pleased with it. I have seen it remarked, I believe in the "Memoirs of Living Authors", that Home [...] has never been able to please an English audience with any but Douglas.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Book

  

Elizabeth Robinson Montagu : An Essay on the Writings and Genius of Shakespeare

'I think Mrs Montague [sic] has fully vindicated Shakespeare from the objections of Voltaire [...] Her three dialogues of the dead at the end of her essay, are I think very good ones.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Book

  

Thomas Mathias : A Translation of the Passages from Greek, Latin, French and Italian in the Pursuits of Literature

'Brought...a translation of the Greek, Latin, French and Italian quotations in the "Pursuits of Literature" which I had rather felt the want of in pursuing the work... I began with this preface but it was so dull that I gave it up after reading about a dozen pages of it. [The Pursuits] needs no apologist. It will stand with posterity on the same shelf as Juvenal, Boileau and Pope.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Book

  

James Thomas Kirkman : Memoirs of the Life of Charles Macklin Esq

'It being the Saturday previous to the annual meeting at the SS Library I was oblig[e]d to return, rather unwillingly, the "Life of Macklin" without having finished the volume. I have found what I have read more entertaining than I expected from the account given in the "Monthly Review" some months past.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Book

  

Thomas James Mathias : The Pursuits of Literature [...] A Satirical Poem

'She [Mrs Montagu] is characterised in this manner in the first part of the "Pursuits of Literature"; comparing the commentators upon Shakespeare [transcribes note on Montagu's essay]. I shall perhaps be accused of want of taste in sending Campbell's "Pleasures of Hope" home unread & indeed I can give no good reason why I did so.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Book

  

Thomas James Mathias : The Pursuits of Literature [...] A Satirical Poem

'Read the first 3 parts of the "Pursuits of Literature", of these the first I admire the most. There are people who will not allow that the author has either wit or learning, or is capable of writing good poetry. I think that wit & learning may be found in every page & that in some parts the poetry is excellent. I will give an example. Page 19. [Two pages of commentary and extracts]'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Book

  

Johann Beckmann : A History of Inventions and Discoveries

'Finished the last vol of Beckmann's "History of Inventions"; I do not know the book that contains a greater variety of information mixed with so much amusement, than these 3 volumes.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Hunter      Print: Book

  

Oliver Goldsmith : The History of England

'search Blackstone and Goldsmith's "History"; much struck with style of latter; deserving, I think, to be more talked of'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Windham      Print: Book

  

John Milton : [poetry]

'Read papers, and last number but one of Cob. a little in the Milton. Licence for universal printing: and in Thucydides'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Windham      Print: Unknown

  

Mary Wortley Montagu : Letters of the Right Hon. Lady Mary Wortley Montagu

'Afterwards, when upstairs, Mrs Montagu's "Letters" which I think very highly of.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Windham      Print: Book

  

Basil Montagu : ['Printed Paper'] or [perhaps] Enquiries and observations

'Found printed paper from Basil Montagu and sat up writing notes to detect its sophistry.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Windham      

  

Basil Montagu : ['Printed Paper'] or [perhaps] Enquiries and observations

'Went on with Basil Montagu, a most shallow reasoner'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: William Windham      

  

Ramsey Muir : A Short History of the British Commonwealth

'I'm off reading this period, glance at Insanity Bir, and open Marjorie's British Commonwealth by Ramsay Muir, at the every page that shows so plainly how Napoleon first won Europe and then set about Britain. Just as Hitler would like to do now. So nicely put. These two books suddenly show me how we stand in this war and how we must fight for out very existence. . . .Yes, I see all at once what we are up against -- How British would fight against any invasion here.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

James Montgomery : Hannah

'"Mary" At fond sixteen my roving Heart Was pierced by love's delightful Dart, ...'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Molineux group, including Mrs Molineux     

  

Charlotte Smith : Evening

'Evening by Charlotte Smith Oh soothing hour, when glowing Day, ...'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Molineux group, including Mrs Molineux     

  

John Byrom : The Three Black Crows

'The Three Black Crows Two honest tradesmen meeting in the Strand'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Molineux group, including Mrs Molineux     

  

William Coombe : Dr Syntax in Search of the Picturesque

'That Man, I trow, is doubly curs't, Who of the best doth make the worst, ...'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Molineux group, including Mrs Molineux     

  

William Combe : The Tour of Dr Syntax in Search of the Picturesque

'The Morning lark ascends on high And with its music greets the Sky... [6 lines]'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Molineux group, including Mrs Molineux     

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost, Book VIII

'To Love thou blam'st me not; for love thou say'st/Leads up to Heaven/ is both the way and guide/...' 'Milton'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Molineux group, including Mrs Molineux     

  

Edward Moore : The Lover and the Friend

'O Thou for whom my lyre Istring/...'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Molineux group, including Mrs Molineux     

  

James Montgomery : Verses to the Memory of the Late Joseph Brown

'The Dying Christian' 'Christianity rears its trophies on the tomb, treasure up then these best of stanzas in the heart' 'Spirit--leave thine house of clay!/...' [ll. 11-16, 49-56]

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Molineux group, including Mrs Molineux     

  

John Doncombe : An Evening Contemplation in a College

'An Evening contemplation in a College; in imitation of Greys Elegy in a country Churchyard "The curfew tolls the hour of closing gates;/ With jarring sound the porter turns the key..."'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Molineux group, including Mrs Molineux     

  

Thomas Moore : The Minstrel Boy

'The Minstrel Boy' 'The Minstrel Boy to the war is gone, /... Moore. Benj. Beanlands, Otley, December 1831'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Benjamin Beanlands      

  

James Thomson : The Castle of Otranto OR To Fortune

'To Fortune' 'I care not fortune what you deny me, ... J. Thompson'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Beanlands group     

  

Robert Hartley Cromek [editor of vol] : 'My Ain Fireside' OR Remains of Nithsdale and Gall

'My Ain Fire Side' 'O, I hae seen great ones...' >From the Nithsdale and Galloway Songs

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Bowly group     

  

Anne Home : 'Elegy' OR Poems by Mrs John Hunter

'Elegy by Mr J. Hunter Sigh not ye winds as passing oer, The Chambers of the dead ye fly... J.H.'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Bowly group     

  

Thomas Campbell : Life of Mrs Siddons

'Lines by Mrs Siddons Say what's the brightest wreath of fame, ... >From Campbell's Life of Mrs Siddons Dec 1834'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Bowly group     

  

James Montgomery : 'In Bereavement' AND 'Forget-Me-Not'

'Lift up thine eyes afflicted soul, ... James Montgomery'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Bowly group     Print: Serial / periodical

  

Felicia Dorothea Hemans : The Graves of a Household

'Graves of a Household' 'They grew in beauty side by side, ...' 'Mrs Hemans'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Bowly group     

  

Thomas Moore : As a beam oer the face of the waters may glow

'As a beam oer the face of the waters may glow, ...'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Bowly group     

  

Thomas Moore : Oh had we some bright little isle

'The Wish' 'Oh! Had we some bright little isle of our own,... S.W. 1821'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: 'S.W.'      

  

James Montgomery : The West Indies OR 'Thy Chains Are Broken'

'Thy chains are broken, Africa, be free!...'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Bowly group     

  

John Milton : Sonnet OR When I consider how my light is spent

'Milton's sonnet on his Blindness "When I consider howmy light is spent"'

Unknown
Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Bowly group     

  

John Milton : [poetry]

'Much depends upon when and where you read a book. In the five or six impatient minutes, before the dinner is quite ready, who would think of taking up the Fairy Queen for a stop-gap, or a volume of Bishop Andrewes' sermons? Milton almost requires a solemn service of music to be played before you enter upon him. But he brings his music, to which, who listens, had need bring docile thoughts, and purged ears.[...] you cannot avoid reading [him] aloud-to your-self or (as it chances) to some single person listening. More than one-and it degenerates into an audience.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Lamb      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

'[Part of a description of his wife] very impatient of contradiction, Reproof She cannot Brook- Milton' [This is a misquotation of 'restraint she will not brook', Book IX, l.1184].

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Benjamin Shaw      Print: Book

  

Nathaniel Marshall : A defence of our constitution in church and state

'transcript of passages from chapter 4 under the commonplce book heading "non jurors"'

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: John Fortescue Aland      

  

James Maddock : The Florist's Directory

'lookd into "Maddox on the culture of flowers" and the "Flora Domestica" which with a few improvments and additions woud be one of the most entertaining books ever written - if I live I will write one on the same plan'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Clare      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

'Lookd into Miltons "Paradise Lost" I once read it thro when I was a boy at the time I liked the "Death of Abel" better [...] I cannot help smiling at my young fancys in those days of happy ignorance'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Clare      Print: Book

  

James Thomson : The Seasons (Winter)

'Lookd into Thompsons Winter there is a freshness about it I think superior to the others [...] the following minute descriptions are great favourites of mine [...] [he misquotes ll 104-5, 130-31]'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Clare      Print: Book

  

Alphonse-Marie-Louis Prat de Lamartine : Histoire des Girondins

'Yesterday morning I received the enclosed note from that most conceited and not over-well-bred Mons. de Lamartine. I desired my friend Madame Belloc to use her own discretion in reporting my criticisms on his Histoire des Girondins, but requested that she would convey to him the thanks and admiration of our family for the manner in which he mentioned the Abbe Edgeworth, and our admiration of the beauty of the writing of that whole passage in the work... I feel, and I am sure so will you and Mr. Butler, "What an egotist and what a puppy it is!" But ovation has turned his head.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Maria Edgeworth      Print: Book

  

Homer : Iliad

[An account of the boy's secret reading, and how his parents only found out when he asked a question about his reading].

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: [a boy known to Elizabeth Hamilton]      Print: Book

  

Oliver Goldsmith : [unknown]

Sir John Hammerton looking back on his early days in Glasgow when he left school and became a correspondence clerk, he said of Cassell's Library "What an Aladdin's cave it proved to me! Addison, Goldsmith, Bacon, Steele, DeQuincey ..., Charles Lamb. Macaulay and many scores of others whom old Professor Morley introduced to me -- what a joy of life I obtained from these, and how greatly they made lifeworth living!"

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Sir John Hammerton      Print: Book

  

Charles Lamb : [unknown]

Sir John Hammerton looking back on his early days in Glasgow when he left school and became a correspondence clerk, he said of Cassell's Library "What an Aladdin's cave it proved to me! Addison, Goldsmith, Bacon, Steele, DeQuincey ..., Charles Lamb. Macaulay and many scores of others whom old Professor Morley introduced to me -- what a joy of life I obtained from these, and how greatly they made life worth living!"

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Sir John Hammerton      Print: Book

  

Hannah More : Memorials of a Departed friend, Private Life and o

'We might mention the Rambler, the Guardian, and Shakespeare, as her favourites among older writers; and, among modern works, Hannah More's writings, memorials of a Departed friend, Private Life and others. From such books she was in the habit, with a sound judgement and a ready pen, of making extracts. Some of which have been collected and preserved...'

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary Birch      Print: Book

  

Alexander von Humboldt : Personal Narrative of Travels

Letter from Aikin to her brother Edmund, dated March 1818: 'It is curious to observe the native eloquence of Humboldt struggling with the encombrance of all the sciences. Did ever mortal man study so many ologies, or travel with so many ometers!'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Lucy Aikin      Print: Book

  

Sir J. Mackintosh : [a text on ethical philosophy]

Letter from Lucy Aikin to her niece Sue, dated Nov.17, 18..?: Aikin has been reading Mackintosh, and comments on the suitability of philosophical reading for women.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Lucy Aikin      Print: Book

  

M. de Secondat, Baron de Montequieu : Spirit of Laws

Two very long quotations: 1. 'Speech is as subject to interpretation there is so great a difference between indescretion and malice...' 2. 'Mythology. The promiscuous assemblage of truth and fiction would long since have been universally exploded...'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Frances Hamilton      Print: Book

  

John Mead : [Sermon about Wakefield's Address to the Inhabitants of Nottingham]

Remark that this publication was 'Abt the Test Act', so presumably read it.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Frances Hamilton      Print: Book

  

Rev William Smith : Poetic Works including his version of Longinus on the Sublime

24 Oct 1788: 'Smith's version of Longinus on the Sublime, a translation with notes and observations - is a credit to the author and reflects lustre on Longinus himself. [Long quotation]: "to the unlearned also it may be of use ... an inclination to literature"'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Frances Hamilton      Print: Book

  

Rev William Smith : Poetic Works including his version of Longinus on the Sublime

13 Dec 1788 Another long quotation from Smith's translation: 'The Sublime is a certain force in discourse... from these three particulars joined together.' Also listed Longinus's five sources of the sublime.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Frances Hamilton      Print: Book

  

Felicia Dorothea Hemans : Casabianca

'when I was eleven a school history-book containing biographies of Sir Thomas More, Sir Philip Sidney, and Sire John Eliot showed me that reading could be something quite different. My reading books up to then must have been poor, for I can remember nothing of them except a description of Damascus, with a sentence to the effect that at night the streets were "as silent as the dead". I had had, of course, to learn "Casabianca" and "Lord Ullin's Daughter" and "Excelsior" and the other vapid poems which are supposed to please children, but like everyone else I was bored by them.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Edwin Muir      Print: Book

  

Thomas Campbell : Lord Ullin's Daughter

'when I was eleven a school history-book containing biographies of Sir Thomas More, Sir Philip Sidney, and Sire John Eliot showed me that reading could be something quite different. My reading books up to then must have been poor, for I can remember nothing of them except a description of Damascus, with a sentence to the effect that at night the streets were "as silent as the dead". I had had, of course, to learn "Casabianca" and "Lord Ullin's Daughter" and "Excelsior" and the other vapid poems which are supposed to please children, but like everyone else I was bored by them.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Edwin Muir      Print: Book

  

William Morris : The Earthly Paradise

'one day in Kirkwall my brother Johnnie, who had gone to work in a shop there, gave me three pennies to spend, and I went at once to the bookseller's which sold "The Penny Poets" and bought "As You Like It", "The Earthly Paradise", and a selection of Matthew Arnold's poems. ...I did not get much out of the selection of Arnold's poems... "As You Like It" delighted me, but it was "The Earthly Paradise" that I read over and over again.'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Edwin Muir      Print: Book

  

Homer : [unknown]

'Maybe to neutralise the Penny Dreadful, Cassells brought out the Penny Classics. These had a bluish-green cover and were world famous novels in abridged form, but sixty or seventy pages. And W.T. Stead brought out the Penny Poets. The covers of these were pimply surface-paper, a bright orange colour, and they contained selections from Longfellow, Tennyson, Keats, and many others. I first read "Hiawatha" and "Evangeline" in the Penny Poets and thought them marvellous; so marvellous that I began to write 'poetry' myself. Stead also brought out another penny book; this had a pink cover and contained selections from the ancient classics: stories from Homer, the writings of Pliny the younger, Aesop's "Fables". I took a strong fancy to Aesop, he was a Greek slave from Samos, in the sixth century BC, and workpeople were only just beginning to be called "wage slaves". I read all these; non-selective and Catholic my reading...'

Century: 1850-1899 / 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Stamper      Print: Book

  

Kenneth Grahame : The Wind in the Willows

'I had not heard of "Wind in the Willows" until I read it during the summer holiday of my seventeenth year!'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Norman Nicholson      Print: Book

  

John Milton : [unknown works]

'Our syllabus was large, covering at least twelve set books: two plays of Shakespeare's, two volumes of Milton and two of Keats; Chaucer, Sheridan, Lamb, Scott's "Old Mortality" and the first book of "The Golden Treasury", with its marvellous pickings of Coleridge, Shelly, Byron and, especially, Wordsworth, which excited me, at that age, more than any other poetry written.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Norman Nicholson      Print: Book

  

Charles Lamb : [unknown works]

'Our syllabus was large, covering at least twelve set books: two plays of Shakespeare's, two volumes of Milton and two of Keats; Chaucer, Sheridan, Lamb, Scott's "Old Mortality" and the first book of "The Golden Treasury", with its marvellous pickings of Coleridge, Shelly, Byron and, especially, Wordsworth, which excited me, at that age, more than any other poetry written.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Norman Nicholson      Print: Book

  

Tobias Smollett : [unknown]

'It [central London] was truly a wonder world, for I seeing it not merely with my eyes of flesh but with the eyes of heightened imagination; -seeing it not only through spectacles manufactured by an optician, but through glasses supplied by magicians names Charles Dickens, Walter Scott, William Makepeace Thackeray, Joseph Addison, Daniel Defoe, Henry Fielding, Toby Smollett, Sam Johnson and Will Shakespeare himself. Had I scraped an acquaintance with all these before I was fifteen? I knew them well! -and that was the trouble. I was book hungry, and I found a land where books were accessible in a quantity and variety sufficient to satisfy even my uncontrolled voracity.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas A. Jackson      Print: Book

  

Homer : Illiad

'Later on I found at the bottom of a cupboard some of volumes -Addison's "Spectator", Pope's "Homer", and a few other things. My grandmother -who also devoured books in great gulps -gave me a "Robinson Crusoe", and lent me volumes containing four "Waverley Novels" apiece. Much about the same time my father got bound up a set of Dickens's novels he had bought in weekly parts. They were in the popular quarto edition with drawings by Fred Barnard, John Mahony and others. These were a real treasure -and all the more so as my father was an ardent Dickens "fan" who rather despised Scott as a "romantic" and a "Tory". His mother (born in 1815, so old enough to have read the "Waverley Novels" when they were still comparatively new things) rather sniffed at Dickens, and definitely preferred both Scott and Thackeray. She gave me "Vanity Fair" as an antidote to "David Copperfield" and added a Shakespeare, and a bundle of "paperback" editions -Fielding, Smollett, Fennimore Cooper and Captain Marryatt.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas A. Jackson      Print: Book

  

Tobias Smollett : [unknown]

'Later on I found at the bottom of a cupboard some of volumes -Addison's "Spectator", Pope's "Homer", and a few other things. My grandmother -who also devoured books in great gulps -gave me a "Robinson Crusoe", and lent me volumes containing four "Waverley Novels" apiece. Much about the same time my father got bound up a set of Dickens's novels he had bought in weekly parts. They were in the popular quarto edition with drawings by Fred Barnard, John Mahony and others. These were a real treasure -and all the more so as my father was an ardent Dickens "fan" who rather despised Scott as a "romantic" and a "Tory". His mother (born in 1815, so old enough to have read the "Waverley Novels" when they were still comparatively new things) rather sniffed at Dickens, and definitely preferred both Scott and Thackeray. She gave me "Vanity Fair" as an antidote to "David Copperfield" and added a Shakespeare, and a bundle of "paperback" editions -Fielding, Smollett, Fennimore Cooper and Captain Marryatt.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas A. Jackson      Print: Book

  

Captain Marryatt : [unknown]

'Later on I found at the bottom of a cupboard some of volumes -Addison's "Spectator", Pope's "Homer", and a few other things. My grandmother -who also devoured books in great gulps -gave me a "Robinson Crusoe", and lent me volumes containing four "Waverley Novels" apiece. Much about the same time my father got bound up a set of Dickens's novels he had bought in weekly parts. They were in the popular quarto edition with drawings by Fred Barnard, John Mahony and others. These were a real treasure -and all the more so as my father was an ardent Dickens "fan" who rather despised Scott as a "romantic" and a "Tory". His mother (born in 1815, so old enough to have read the "Waverley Novels" when they were still comparatively new things) rather sniffed at Dickens, and definitely preferred both Scott and Thackeray. She gave me "Vanity Fair" as an antidote to "David Copperfield" and added a Shakespeare, and a bundle of "paperback" editions -Fielding, Smollett, Fennimore Cooper and Captain Marryatt.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas A. Jackson      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : History of England

'We had read at school in our Reading Books, gorgeous bits from Macaulay's "History" -the Trial of the Seven Bishops and the Relief of Derry -and it was therefore natural that I should pounce with my penny at the sight of a copy of his essay on "Warren Hastings", which hit my eye on almost my first visit to the Row... I read it, I remember, on the Embankment -lying in the sun on my belly on the flat top of the ornamental arch, near Cleopatra's needle, up which a boy could climb... The series which included this edition of "Warren Hastings" gave an obvious first step along this road. It was one of Cassells National Library, a series of literary classics edited by Henry Morley, Professor of English Literature at London University, sold for 3d. paper and 6d. cloth. New or secondhand they opened an enticing field for adventurous exploration. So did a parallel series of shilling volumes the Universal Library issued by Routledge, batches of which used to be dumped upon the secondhand market and sold for 4d a copy.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas A. Jackson      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : Warren Hastings

'We had read at school in our Reading Books, gorgeous bits from Macaulay's "History" -the Trial of the Seven Bishops and the Relief of Derry -and it was therefore natural that I should pounce with my penny at the sight of a copy of his essay on "Warren Hastings", which hit my eye on almost my first visit to the Row... I read it, I remember, on the Embankment -lying in the sun on my belly on the flat top of the ornamental arch, near Cleopatra's needle, up which a boy could climb... The series which included this edition of "Warren Hastings" gave an obvious first step along this road. It was one of Cassells National Library, a series of literary classics edited by Henry Morley, Professor of English Literature at London University, sold for 3d. paper and 6d. cloth. New or secondhand they opened an enticing field for adventurous exploration. So did a parallel series of shilling volumes the Universal Library issued by Routledge, batches of which used to be dumped upon the secondhand market and sold for 4d a copy.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas A. Jackson      Print: Book

  

William Drummond : [poems complete works]

'I devoured poetry and nothing but poetry until I became insensible to poetry. Take an example; I happened upon some fat volumes of Campbell's "British Poets", the complete works of from four to eight poets in each volume which cost me 6d. apiece. They had shabby worn leather bindings, and the type was on the small side and closely set. But I ploughed through them, doggedly, as if reading for a bet, or an imposed task. One volume I remember contained the poetical works of Samuel Daniel, Browne, Giles and Phineas Fletcher, Ben Jonson, Drummond (of Ha[w]thornden), John Donne, and some more minor ones. Another contained along with "also rans" Cowley, Milton and "Hudibras" Butler. And, I repeat, I ploughed through them with a stout heart, but little sense, and a dwindling understanding.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas A. Jackson      Print: Book

  

John Milton : [poems complete works]

'I devoured poetry and nothing but poetry until I became insensible to poetry. Take an example; I happened upon some fat volumes of Campbell's "British Poets", the complete works of from four to eight poets in each volume which cost me 6d. apiece. They had shabby worn leather bindings, and the type was on the small side and closely set. But I ploughed through them, doggedly, as if reading for a bet, or an imposed task. One volume I remember contained the poetical works of Samuel Daniel, Browne, Giles and Phineas Fletcher, Ben Jonson, Drummond (of Ha[w]thornden), John Donne, and some more minor ones. Another contained along with "also rans" Cowley, Milton and "Hudibras" Butler. And, I repeat, I ploughed through them with a stout heart, but little sense, and a dwindling understanding.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas A. Jackson      Print: Book

  

James and Horatio Smith : Rejected Addresses; or the new Theatrum Poetarum

'Upon Mrs Digweed's mentioning that she had sent the Rejected Addresses to Mr Hinton, I began talking to her a little about them & expressed my hope of their having amused her. Her answer was, "Oh! dear, yes, very much; - very droll indeed; - the opening of the House! - & the striking up of the Fiddles!" What she meant, poor woman, who shall say? - I sought no farther.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Jane Austen      Print: Book

  

James and Horatio Smith : Rejected Addresses; or the new Theatrum Poetarum

'Upon Mrs Digweed's mentioning that she had sent the Rejected Addresses to Mr Hinton, I began talking to her a little about them & expressed my hope of their having amused her. Her answer was, "Oh! dear, yes, very much; - very droll indeed; - the opening of the House! - & the striking up of the Fiddles!" What she meant, poor woman, who shall say? - I sought no farther.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Mrs Digweed      Print: Book

  

James and Horatio Smith : Rejected Addresses; or the new Theatrum Poetarum

'The Papillons have now got the Book [J & H Smith's "Rejected Addresses"] and like it very much; their niece Eleanor has recommended it most warmly to them. - [italics] She [end italics] looks like a rejected Addresser.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Papillon Family     Print: Book

  

James and Horatio Smith : Rejected Addresses; or the new Theatrum Poetarum

'The Papillons have now got the Book [J & H Smith's "Rejected Addresses"] and like it very much; their niece Eleanor has recommended it most warmly to them. - [italics] She [end italics] looks like a rejected Addresser.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Eleanor Papillon      Print: Book

  

Sir George Steuart Mackenzie : Travels in Iceland

'And what are their Biglands & their Barrows, their Macartneys & Mackenzies, to Capt. Pasley's Essay on the Military Police of the British Empire, & the Rejected Addresses?'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Jane Austen      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

'Read a little of "Paradise lost"'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

Leonhard Schmitz : A History of Greece, from the earliest times to the destruction of Corinth, B.C. 146

'Worked for an hour to day at French and read some Grecian History, The latter is certainly rather dry.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

Leonhard Schmitz : A History of Greece, from the earliest times to the destruction of Corinth, B.C. 146

'learnt some French from "Allendorff" read some of "La petite Fadette" a novel by George Sand, and also some of Schmitz "History of Greece", it all helps to pass away the time.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

Leonhard Schmitz : A History of Greece, from the earliest times to the destruction of Corinth, B.C. 146

'Have been working at French & reading "History of Greece"'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

Leonhard Schmitz : A History of Greece, from the earliest times to the destruction of Corinth, B.C. 146

'I cannot work this weather it is too hot, I have read a chapter of the "History of Greece" to day and that is all.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

Thomas Moore : The Epicurean. A Tale

'Finished the "Epicurean" by Moore, it is a sad story but very prettily written; began to read the play of "Julius Caesar" by Shakespeare as I had all night, I was able to stay up till late - learning by heart "Paradise & the Peri"'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

Thomas Moore : Paradise and the Peri

'Finished the "Epicurean" by Moore, it is a sad story but very prettily written; began to read the play of "Julius Caesar" by Shakespeare as I had all night, I was able to stay up till late - learning by heart "Paradise & the Peri"'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

Thomas More : Utopia

'These artless idealists had their favourite authors, which I now proceeded to read...Their piece de resistance was Sir Thomas More's "Utopia", closely followed by the prose works of William Morris, "The Story of the Unknown Church", and the like. There was quite a spate of novels with this ideology, but the only one that has come down to the present day is Edward Bellamy's "Looking Backward".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Stamper      Print: Book

  

William Morris : [prose works]

'These artless idealists had their favourite authors, which I now proceeded to read...Their piece de resistance was Sir Thomas More's "Utopia", closely followed by the prose works of William Morris, "The Story of the Unknown Church", and the like. There was quite a spate of novels with this ideology, but the only one that has come down to the present day is Edward Bellamy's "Looking Backward".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Stamper      Print: Book

  

William Morris : The Story of the Unknown Church

'These artless idealists had their favourite authors, which I now proceeded to read...Their piece de resistance was Sir Thomas More's "Utopia", closely followed by the prose works of William Morris, "The Story of the Unknown Church", and the like. There was quite a spate of novels with this ideology, but the only one that has come down to the present day is Edward Bellamy's "Looking Backward".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Stamper      Print: Book

  

Edward Bellamy : Looking Backwards

'These artless idealists had their favourite authors, which I now proceeded to read...Their piece de resistance was Sir Thomas More's "Utopia", closely followed by the prose works of William Morris, "The Story of the Unknown Church", and the like. There was quite a spate of novels with this ideology, but the only one that has come down to the present day is Edward Bellamy's "Looking Backward".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Joseph Stamper      Print: Book

  

About Edmond : Le roi des Montagnes

'Reading "Le Roi des Montagnes" by Ed About'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : The history of England from the accession of James the Second

'Reading Macauleys "history of England" for the 2nd time'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : The history of England from the accession of James the Second

'I have been reading Macauleys "history of England", and have got thro 5 volumes, it is very interesting'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : The history of England from the accession of James the Second

'I am reading Macauleys "history of England", it is so interesting that it keeps me up at night, later than I ought to remain, it is a book, that when once a person has commenced it, he finds it impossible to leave off, until he has finished it -'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : The history of England from the accession of James the Second

'I have finished Macaulay's "history of England" and am now reading his speeches, they are interesting.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : Speeches of the Right Honorable T. B. Macaulay, M.P. corrected by himself ..

'I have finished Macaulay's "history of England" and am now reading his speeches, they are interesting.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

Alexandre Dumas : Antonine

'Reading a book by Alexr Dumas fils called "Antonine", a stupid book in my opinion.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

Edward Hamley : Lady Lee's Widowhood

'Lady Lee's Widowhood by Captain Hamley R.A. it is not so good a book as I expected, it has been praised too much; so that I do not think so much of it, as if I had never heard it spoken of.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

Xavier Aymon de, Count Montepin : Les Filles de platre. Les trois debuts

'Reading the "Les filles des platre" by M. Xavier de Montepin it is like the generality of French Novels, and does not give a very exalted notions of French morals; the more I read French books, the more I am struck at the immense difference there is between the two nations that are only seperated [sic] by a narrow channel, twenty miles across; Customs manners & morals are entirely different; there is no nation in the world so much in love with domestic happiness & domestic comfort as the English, and none less so, than the French; that which affords great pleasure to our neighbours, excites only disgust in an Englishman; this I gather not only from the Books I read, but also from what I saw myself during my stay in France, and the older I get, the more thankful I am that I was not born a Frenchman.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

William Douglas Hamilton : Outlines of the History of England

'I am now reading a history of England by Douglas Hamilton, it seems to be very well written'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

William Douglas Hamilton : Outlines of the History of England

'As I expect a heap of books from England, I am having two book shelves put up in my cabin. I am afraid it will darken it a little, mais n'importe I am reading the constitutional history of England by Mr Hamilton it is very interesting. as soon as my books arrive I shall set to work in good earnest and try and improve myself, I think I have the brains, what I want is the application; my duties too interfere very much with any regular study.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Albert Battiscombe      Print: Book

  

A.E. Housman : unknown

'Hobbies. Mentioned 10 times. Twice as normal, three times increased (walking, stamp collecting, reading). One "war outlook; making of aeroplanes, etc", one "Juniors play 'Germans and English' and 'Shoot the Dictator'". One "reading now of Houseman [sic], Eliot, and Owen", one "extra keenness in inter-school conferences", one "debates on hobbies".'

Unknown
Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      

  

Martin le Roy de Gomberville : Polexandre

'Home and to bed, leaving my wife reading in "Polixandre".'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Pepys      Print: Book

  

John Tatham : The Rump, or The mirror of the late times

'So to Pauls churchyard and there bought "Montelion", which this yeardoth not prove so good as the last was; and so after reading it, I burned it. After reading of that and the Comedy of "The Rump", which is also very silly, I went to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

John Smith : The sea-man's grammar

'earley up in the morning to read the "Seamans grammar and dictionary" I lately have got, which doth please me exceedingly well.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

Thomas Middleton : The Spanish Gypsy

'The afternoon, while Will is abroad, I spent in reading "The Spanish Gypsy", a play not very good, though commended much.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

Edmaston : Sonnet

'Read B[isho]p Andrew's Devotions & various other prayers. Read Blair's Sermon 'On our ignorance of good & evil in this life' [...] Read portions of Bryant 'On the plagues of Egypt' [...] In the Evening read Archp. Tellotison's Sermon 'On the happiness of heaven', which I found interesting & in simple language... Read sev.l Poetical pieces suitable to this sacred day among others Edmaston's delightful sonnet.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Cole      Print: Book

  

Bishop Moore : Sermons

'Used B[isho]p Andrew's exct Prayers both mg & aftn - read one of Blair's sermons morng. Evg read one of B[isho]p Moore's sermons.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Cole      Print: Unknown

  

Phyllis Bottome : The Mortal Storm

'Yes, I read more as have more time- but have gone onto novels and escapist literature- cannot read such books as The Mortal Storm and books like Fallen Bastions now. I also try to keep up with political reading but find it rather difficult- for example to follow the communist line- but still read the Daily worker, Tribune, New Statesman, each week to try and get a composite picture but get depressed as the papers differ so from the daily papers such as the Telegraph, Mail and Express.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

William Camden : Britannia

'and so I left them with him and went with Mr Moore to Grayes Inne to his chamber, and there he showed me his old Cambdens "Brittannia", which I intended to buy of him and so took it away with me and left it at St Pauls churchyard to be bound'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

Stephanie Felicite Ducrest de St Albin Comtesse de Genlis : Olympe et Theophile

'My dear Caroline, I am very glad to have an opportunity of answering your agreable [sic] little Letter. You seem to be quite my own Neice [sic] in your feelings towards Mde de Genlis. I do not think I could even now, at my sedate time of Life, read "Olimpe et Theophile" without being in a rage. It really is too bad! Not allowing them to be happy together, when they are married. Don't talk of it, pray. I have just let your Aunt Frank the 1st vol. of Les Veilles du Chateau, for Mary Jane to read.'

Century: 1700-1799 / 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Jane Austen      Print: Book

  

Tobias Gentleman : Englands way to win wealth... with a true relation of the inestimable wealth that is yearely taken out of His Majesties seas by the Hollanders

'Then we fell to reading of a book which I saw the other day at my Lord Sandwichs, entended for the late King, finely bound up - a treatise concerning the benefit the Hollanders make of our fishing; but whereas I expected great matters from it, I find it a very impertinent book; and though some things good, yet so full of tautologys that we were weary of it.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

George Chapman : Bussy D'Ambois

'and so home and to supper. And after reading part of "Bussy D'Ambois", a good play I bought today - to bed.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

Louis MacNeice : Autumm Journal

'Reading, MacNeice "Autumm Journal". I enjoyed it very much and think it good. A. Werth, "Moscow '41". Very good - clear - interesting. One of these books which fill out the mind a bit.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

H V Morton : I James Blunt

'Reading H.V. Morton, "I James Blunt". I read it in half an hour. It is propaganda but first-class propaganda and interesting and very readable and horribly convincing. It should shake up the complacent. If invasion succeeded it would be like that here. The weak point was the suggestion that all the dominions had been overthrown too - at least New Zealand had.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

Gerald Samson : Warning Light of Asia

'Just now I'm reading books [of] what I call Geography plus books that give great insight in [to] different places. I'm reading now the causes and conditions that brought about this war. (Warning Light of Asia, Samson)'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

Michael McLaverty : Lost Fields

'It appealed to me - I like books about the country and farms and country life in general. (Lost Fields: McLaverty)'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

Bessie Myers : Escape

'I read various types of novels. Some books give long involved descriptions. I don't mind a little of that, but in addition the story has to have a certain amount of faction....I've just finished "Escape" by Bessie Myers. I rather liked it. I admired the efficiency of the girls, as well as the incidents they experienced as a result of their flight. Part of it is in Diary Form, it gave you a certain sense of intimacy, and it didn't seem a bit fantastic.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

Ernest Hemingway : For whom the Bell Tolls

'Oh, I like funny books, like Thorne Smith, you know, nothing too serious. ("For whom the Bell Tolls", Hemingway, was very good).'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

Thorne Smith : unknown

'Oh, I like funny books, like Thorne Smith, you know, nothing too serious. ("For whom the Bell Tolls", Hemingway, was very good).'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

Daphne Du Maurier : Rebecca

'I liked Rebecca and 'Gone with the Wind".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

Margaret Mitchell : Gone with the Wind

'I liked Rebecca and 'Gone with the Wind".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

Margaret Mitchell : Gone with the wind

'I like anything good....something like "The Stars Looked Down" or "Gone with the Wind"...."Fame is the Spur" is a lovely book.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

Peter Fleming : News from Tartary

'"I don't read much - oh, a very mixed lot - "My Son Absalom" and "Fame is the Spur"' [then in response to question from interviewer] '- who, them? I enjoy travel books, that one there was so famous .!.. "Something in Tartary", extremely nice". (Fleming).'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

Daphne Du Maurier : Rebecca

'I like Travel books - something uplifting - teaches you something. Of course, I like dirty books too....Have you read John Blunt - you ought to - "Mein Kampf". Oh, I liked "Rebecca" and "Gone with the Wind".'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

Margaret Mitchell : Gone with the Wind

'I like Travel books - something uplifting - teaches you something. Of course, I like dirty books too....Have you read John Blunt - you ought to - 'Mein Kampf'. Oh, I liked 'Rebecca' and 'Gone with the Wind'.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

H Williamson : Norfolk Farm

'H. Williamson's "Norfolk Farm", for the detail making me feel I had lived those hard days myself.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

[Samuel] [Newman] : A concordance to the Holy Scriptures

'I went up vexed to my chamber and there fell examining my new "Concordance" that I have bought with Newmans, the best that ever was out before, and I find mine altogether as copious as that and something larger, though the order in some respects not so good, that a man may think a place is missing, when it is only put in another place.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Book

  

John Gideon Millingen : The Portrait Gallery

?Dr Milligen?s paper, he must re-write the last half of it; it has cost me three hours this morning, and I can make nothing of it. I think very little of the gentleman who writes so complacently from Northampton with his first of a Series; but I suppose he?s a great man in a small way.?

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Charles Dickens      Manuscript: Unknown

  

Bracebridge Hemyng : Jack Harkaway

'The favourite literary pabulum of us boys at school, however, was less classical: "penny bloods" and other Weeklies issued in penny sheets, such as "Sweeny Todd the Barber". Romantic stories of highwaymen circulated freely from boy to boy until reduced to rags: Dick Turpin, Spring-heeled Jack, the gallant Claude Duval, gracefully dancing on the greensward with the ladies he had robbed, Edith the Captive, Edith Heron, with what impatience we awaited the issue of the next number, with what absorbing interest we followed the thrilling adventure!... What it did was to evoke the reading habit, and to one boy at least that was a valuable endowment. Nor did the "Boys of England" proffer a much healthier pabulum to the hunger of the young barbarian for extra-lawful adventure. I can even today visualise the number I read with the lovely alliterate title of its opening story, "Alone in the Pirates' Lair" - and the front page illustration - Jack Harkaway, sitting before the pirate on the island, open-eyed, drinking in the recital of his hazardous deeds;...'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Thomas Okey      Print: Serial / periodical

  

Lindley Murray : Power of Religion

'Mrs C read me part of Murray's Power of religion.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: [Mrs] Cole      Print: Book

  

Macdiarmid : Sketches of Nature

'Read occasionally during my walk in Macdiarmid's "Sketches of nature".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Cole      Print: Book

  

Isaac Ambrose : Looking into Jesus

'I have been reading a sweet work lately, and earnestly recommend it to you my dear, pray let me have your opinion when you have read it. "Looking into Jesus" is the title, written by Isaac Ambrose [sic] The original was a large book, the one I speak of is about the size of a New Testament having been abridged by Rev Robert Cox-Hackney to render it a more saleable work.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Marshall      Print: Book

  

Hannah More : Practical piety

'Mrs Hannah More's "Practical piety" is a very useful book I think, perhaps you have read it if you think of any [underlined] you wish me to read my dear Susan please to name them [...] I am much favor'd with books which the kindness of friends supply, but while drinking with pleasure of some streams, I find the water of life only [underlined] in the Fountain [underlined]! I need not say I mean the Bible.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Marshall      Print: Book

  

George Meredith : Evan Harrington

'In discussing Meredith's "Evan Harrington" (1861) in a letter to Campbell, Arthur reveals his Victorian-orientated interst in the autobiographical element in novels: "... there is really a wonderful sympathy & tenderness towards the suffering Lady Dunstane. Does it not seem as if she may be, at least in some points, his wife? I should like to think so."'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Arthur Symons      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost [?]

'. H. Ewing's diary entry: 'In the evening Boy read Milton to me and I worked'.

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Alexander (Rex) Ewing      Print: Book

  

Sir Joseph Williamson : Oxford Gazette

'This day the first of the "Oxford Gazettes" came out, which is very pretty, full of news, and no folly in it - wrote by Williamson.'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Samuel Pepys      Print: Newspaper

  

Oliver Goldsmith : The Vicar of Wakefield

'Mr Jaegle makes us read an English book that is called "The Vicar of Wakefield" which is very pretty, interesting, well wrote and where there are some very good characters'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth (Betsey) Wynne      Print: Unknown

  

Moliere [pseud.] : Les Femmes Savantes

'[Betsey Wynne:] We read this evening "Les Femmes Savantes" and "Les Precieuses Ridicules" of the Theatre of Moliere. I thought I should die from laughing in hearing the latter piece which is as amusing as it is possible to be. [Eugenia Wynne] Mr de Regis read to us and made all the possible faces for Mascarille. I find that France has made a great loss when Moliere died. It is said that he died during an acting of "Le Malade Imaginaire", one of his own pieces for in straining to make himself appear the more natural he burst a vein in his chest and died a few hours after. It is wearying that such a superior talent as that which was possessed by Moliere should not be immortal. Excellent author! better poet! Who has more glorified the amiable Thalia? What more can one desire?'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: de Regis (M.)      Print: Serial / periodical, Unknown

  

Moliere [pseud.] : Les Precieuses Ridicules

'[Betsey Wynne:] We read this evening "Les Femmes Savantes" and "Les Precieuses Ridicules" of the Theatre of Moliere. I thought I should die from laughing in hearing the latter piece which is as amusing as it is possible to be. [Eugenia Wynne] Mr de Regis read to us and made all the possible faces for Mascarille. I find that France has made a great loss when Moliere died. It is said that he died during an acting of "Le Malade Imaginaire", one of his own pieces for in straining to make himself appear the more natural he burst a vein in his chest and died a few hours after. It is wearying that such a superior talent as that which was possessed by Moliere should not be immortal. Excellent author! better poet! Who has more glorified the amiable Thalia? What more can one desire?'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: de Regis (M.)      Print: Serial / periodical, Unknown

  

Moliere [pseud.] : Le Tartuffe

[Betsey Wynne]'Our reading today was of Moliere, Mr de Regis read "Le Tartufe" which is his finest piece'. [Eugenia comments the next day, 'Le vilain homme que ced Tartufe! cependant je crois qu'il y a bien des caracteres aussi ambominables et aussie hypocrites que cela'.]

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: de Regis (M.)      Print: Serial / periodical, Unknown

  

William Temple : [letter]

'As long as your last [letter] was, I read it over thrice in less then an hower, though to say truth I skipt some on't the last time, I could not read my owne confession soe offten. Love is a Terrible word, and I should blush to death if any thing but a letter accused mee on't . . .'

Century: 1600-1699     Reader/Listener/Group: Dorothy Osborne      Manuscript: Letter

  

Delarivier Manley : Secret memoirs and manners of several persons of quality of both sexes, from the new Atalantis, an island in the Mediterranean

'Ten thousand thanks to you for Madame de Noyer's Letters; I wish Signor Roselli may be as diverting to you as [italics] she [italics]has been to me. The stories are very extraordinary, but I know not whether she has not added a few [italics] agremens [italics] of invention to them: however, there is some truth. I have been told, in particular, that the history of the fair unfortunate Madame de Barbesierre is so, by people who could not be suspected of romancing. Don't you think that the court of England would furnish stories as entertaining? Say nothing of my malice; but I cannot help wishing that Madame de Noyer would turn her thoughts a little that way. I fancy she would succeed better than the authoress of the "New Atalantis". I am sure I like her method much better, which has, I think, hit that difficult path between the gay and the severe, and is neither too loose, nor affected by pride.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Lady Mary Wortley Montagu      Print: Book

  

Guy de Maupassant : Bel-Ami

'. . . I have just finished Guy de Maupassant?s Bel Ami. One of the most obviously truthful, British-matron-shocking, disgusting, attractive, overwhelmingly-powerful novels I have ever read. It would be a good antidote to Le Jardin de Berenice. Would you like it?'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Arnold Bennett      Print: Book

  

Moliere [pseud.] : L'Ecole des Maris

'we came back in the dark and read "L'Ecole des Maris" and after we played at 21'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth (Betsey) Wynne      Print: Unknown

  

Moliere [pseud.] : Les Precieuses Ridicules

[Betsey]:'The gazettes from France were read this evening there was nothing remarquable in them. We began again "Les Precieuses Ridicules" but had no time to for supper was called'. [Eugenia]: 'In the evening the Paris papers were read I did not give them any attention then we began to reread for Madame de Bombelles "Les Precieuses Ridicules" which was interrupted by supper'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Eugenia Wynne      Print: Unknown

  

Moliere [pseud.] : Le Medecin Malgre Lui

'As Mr de Regis was gone to St Gall today, M. l'Abbe read to us "Le Medecin Malgre lui" of Moliere a charming comedy that diverted me greatly'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: M. l'Abbe      Print: Unknown

  

Thomas a Kempis : The Imitation of Jesus Christ

'I spent the evening reading with Mama "the Imitation of Jesus Christ" until supper'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth (Betsey) Wynne      Print: Unknown

  

J.W. Marriott : One Act Plays of Today

'Friday, 1st January, Completed my paper on Mazzini. Read: ?One Act Plays of today? 2nd vol. (Harrap) ?Autocrat of the Breakfast table? (O.W.Holmes).'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Gerald Moore      Print: Book

  

Niccolo Machiavelli : History of Florence

'Thursday, 7th January, Offered Pat 19th January or 16th March for his friend?s lecture. Smith does not expect to leave for the Coast until about October. He expects to go with Adams. Read: ?History of Florence? ( Machiavelli)'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Gerald Moore      Print: Book

  

J. Ramsay Macdonald : Socialism: Critical and Constructive

'Saturday, 16th January, Left letter at Beechcroft for Milligan re continuance of Discussion Group through the summer. Also re donation from Club and Mr. Milligan?s date on syllabus. Read ? ?Socialism: Critical and Constructive? (J.R. McDonald)'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Gerald Moore      Print: Book

  

Leonard Merrick : A Chair on the Boulevard

'Thursday,28th January, ?Peer Gynt? is good stuff. I hope the Beechcroft Players tackle it some time. Though I suppose it has been done too often. In any case Bensham have done it and Beechcroft must set the pace, not follow the lead. Read ? ?A chair on the Boulevard? (L. Merrick)'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Gerald Moore      Print: Book

  

E. Phillips Oppenheim : The Great Impersonation

'Monday, 8th February, Gave the Anno Domini a miss. Tired. Reading Herrick. Also Oppenheim ?The Great Impersonation?. How efficiently this stuff is written. Exciting.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Gerald Moore      Print: Book

  

Herman Melville : Omoo

'Wednesday, 10th February, Wrote to Mr Robinson and to Mr. D. Paterson re lecture dates. Read ?Omoo? (Melville)'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Gerald Moore      Print: Book

  

Guy de Maupassant : Notre Coeur

'Saturday,13th February, Read ?Notre Coeur? (Guy de Maupassant)'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Gerald Moore      Print: Book

  

Henry James : The American

'Sunday, 21st February, Discussion group ? nothing doing ? arrived late. Members busy with a game in which, with the help of a pin and a newspaper they lost or won pennies. Whisper it not in Gath ? I joined in and ? extreme of immorality ? lost ! Read ? ?The American? (Henry James)'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Gerald Moore      Print: Book

  

Oliver Wendell Holmes : The Autocrat of the Breakfast Table

'Friday, 5th March, I worked late tonight which allowed me to get in a nice little talk with Pat on the value of the classic books of criticism, as apart from their literary value. It was my opinion that in nearly all cases, as the minds of readers has evolved with the changing times so the light in which the classic must be viewed has altered and therefore old criticism must, in nearly every case be superseded. At least, as regards the ?human? as distinct from the literary element in the book. I feel that we cannot ever completely reconstruct the life of a past age or enter into the minds of people who lived in other times. Pat remarked that he was constantly struck by the little progress made in thought and the things of the mind. Read ? ?The Autocrat of the breakfast table? (O. W. Holmes).'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Gerald Moore      Print: Book

  

Edmond Holmes : The Tragedy of Education

'Monday, 29th March, A 21st birthday party at the Roberts?. Pleaded illness and got off. My clothes will hardly do. Bought Ira ?Far from the Madding Crowd?. Wrote Adana people re printing press. Have decided on a course for the Club next year ? ?The English Historical Novel??a study of English history, manners and institutions. A lot can be done with this if the books are carefully chosen. Read -- ?the Tragedy of Education (Edmond Holmes)'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Gerald Moore      Print: Book

  

R.H. Mottram : The Spanish Farm

'Thursday 24th June. ?The Spanish Farm? ? (R.H. Mottram). Our ?Robin Hood? Pageant tonight (250 present). I see the ?Daily Post? criticism on poor casting. Quite right too.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Gerald Moore      Print: Book

  

Percy Wyndham Lewis : At the Sign of the Black Moon

'Saturday 26th June ?At the Sign of the Black Moon? ? (Wyndham-Lewis)'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Gerald Moore      Print: Book

  

Rose Macaulay : Orphan Island

'Wednesday 30th June. ?Orphan Island? ? (Rose Macaulay). Looked after the infants today while Teddie went to work. Then a walk in the evening and bringing my arrears of writing up to date. We must look Dad up tomorrow, he will be lonely and depressed.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Gerald Moore      Print: Book

  

Rose Macaulay : Orphan Island

'Thursday 1st July This has been one of those demoralising days when a late rising leaves one unable to make any use of the shortened day. We should have gone to see Dad but left it too late. However, I have finished ?Orphan Island? and so added a rich recollection to my sum of experience. It is a great book. Really Great. The whole idea is inimitably that of the author of ?Told by an Idiot?. Rose Macauley?s chief charm is the delightful sustained humour of her prose. Every word is charmingly quiet and sweet, and yet how devastating the satire and the irony. What a pity. I have to admit to being so hopelessly ?orphan? since she finds so little in them but noise and sentiment.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Gerald Moore      Print: Book

  

George Moore : The Untilled Field

'Saturday 7th August ?The Untilled Field? ? (George Moore)'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Gerald Moore      Print: Book

  

"Bartimeus" : The Long Trick

Sunday 26th September ?The Long Trick?, - ?Bartimeus? A delightfully quiet day at home. Reading and writing. Had an hour or two at the piano and showed form. I like ?Bartimeus? ? in the mood. He is delightfully humorous in a somewhat lugubrious manner.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Gerald Moore      Print: Book

  

Tobias Smollett : Roderick Random

'Thursday 14th October ?Roderick Random? (T. Smolett)'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Gerald Moore      Print: Book

  

Rev Lewis Tomlinson : Recreations in Astronomy

'We were told that a Bible and Testament were placed at the head of each bed; and we saw one convict reading "Recreations in Astronomy".'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: anon      Print: Book

  

Victor MacClure : The Boost of the Golden Snail: A Fantasy of London

'Monday 13th December ?The Boost of the Golden Snail? ? (Macclure)'.

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Gerald Moore      Print: Book

  

Edward Whymper : Scrambles among the Alps

'Saturday 25th December. ?Scrambles among the Alps? (Whymper) Trying to get the proper atmosphere in a snow-less Christmas. Certainly, if any book could give it, it is this one. Today has been rather a bore. The usual heavyweight dinner made everybody too somnolent to allow of any attempt at enjoyment. So we slept and read and ate and ? finally ? slept.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Gerald Moore      Print: Book

  

Gerald Moore : [list of books read in 1926]

'5th January ? Wednesday. I have taken out a list of the books I read last year; they total 83. Not so bad, considering that I always read the books I start on.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Gerald Moore      Print: Book

  

V. Marguerite : La Gar?onne

'29th March, Tuesday. ?La Gar?onne? V. Marguerite. 30th March, Wednesday. These last few days I have been reading Marguerite?s ?La Gar?onne?. I am disappointed. Instead of an exciting chronicle of debauchery, full of hints on sex-relationship, I find it simply a rather vigorous, but incurably sentimental treatise on Malthusianism. One or two of its scenes are realistic in the strictest sense, but for the rest, his heroine is a most romantic young lad who finishes up by falling in love properly and setting up in matrimony. But then I have always found the French sentimental.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Gerald Moore      Print: Book

  

Walt Whitman : Song of the Open Road

'14th March 1929. I had the ?Open Road? in my pocket, and we [G.M. and a friend, Miss Mundel] read bits together, and talked of ?Wander-thirst?, of Stevenson, of gardens, of tobacco, and (with E.V.L. in our minds) of ?Punch?. I recommended some of the glorious days I have passed in the country beyond St. Cloud with this book for company, and recited Stevenson?s ?Requiem? which Miss M?ndel liked and copied. The Websters gave me three numbers of ?Punch? for my week-end reading.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Gerald Moore      Print: Book

  

Oliver Wendell Holmes : unknown

'15th March 1929 Miss M?ndel and I inspect my little library. We read some Brooks, Kipling, Holmes, Artemus Ward, de Quincey -- in short, a browse. We looked at ?Phiz? illustrations to ?Sketches by Boz? and she talked of Wilhelm Busch as the greatest of German pencil artists.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Gerald Moore      Print: Book

  

Homer : Iliad

'I read over your Homer here with an infinite pleasure, and find several little passages explained, that I did not before entirely comprehend the beauty of...It would be too tedious to you to point out all the passages that relate to present customs.'

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary, Lady Wortley Montagu      

  

Lemprier : Tour to Morocco

Elizabeth Missing Sewell on being read to as a child by her mother, Jane Sewell (nee Edwards; married 1802): 'I can recall now the pleasure with which (taking turns with my sisters) I used to jump up into her lap and listen whilst she read to us [italics]Anson's Voyages[end italics], or [italics]Lemprier's Tour to Morocco[end italics], or the [italics]History of Montezuma[end italics]. When she had finished, we all, kneeling round her, said our prayers and went to bed happy.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Jane Sewell      Print: Book

  

Sarah Trimmer : 'Selections [from the Bible]'

Elizabeth Missing Sewell on her reading at school: 'At Miss Crooke's [school] [...] we learned Pinnock's Catechisms of History and Geography [...] For religious instruction we read portions of the Old Testament, and the Gospels, and Acts of the Apostles in a class every day, using Mrs. Trimmer's "Selections"'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Pupils at Miss Crooke's school, Newport, Isle of Wight.     Print: Book

  

Mason : Plays

'My chief acquaintance with the writers of the eighteenth century is derived from reading to Aunt Lyddy papers in the [italics]Spectator[end italics] and [italics]The Rambler[end italics], Mason's plays, Addison's [italics]Cato[end italics], etc. This we were often called to do when we were invited to dine with Aunt Clarke [reader's great-aunt, to whom "Lyddy," Sewell's father's unmarried sister, a companion].'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Sewell      Print: Book

  

[Abbe] Barthelemy : Les Voyages du Jeune Anacharsis

'I took my two lessons with Mr Jaegle, we began to read "Les Voyages du Jeune Anarchasis". The little that I heard today pleased me enormously and the style is very fine'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth (Betsey) Wynne      Print: Book

  

James Thomson : [a tragedy]

'I read today an English Tragedy by Thomson that pleased me much and made me like that author's works'.

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth (Betsey) Wynne      Print: Unknown

  

Jean Dumont : A New Voyage to the Levant

'Your whole letter is full of mistakes from one end to the other. I see you have taken your ideas of Turkey from that worthy author Dumont, who has written with equal ignorance and confidentiality. 'Tis a particular pleasure to me here, to read the voyages to the Levant, which are generally so far removed from truth, and so full of absurdities, I am very well diverted with them. They never fail giving you an account of the women, whom 'tis certain they never saw, and talking very wisely of the genius of the men, into whose company they are never admitted; and very often describe mosques, which they dare not peep into.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary, Lady Wortley Montagu      Print: Book

  

Homer : Odyssey

'I hope we shall have soon the Odyssey from your happy hand, and I think I shall follow with singular pleasure the traveller Ulysses, who was an observer of men and manners, when he travels in your harmonious numbers.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary, Lady Wortley Montagu      Print: Book

  

Homer : Iliad

'It is true, the excellence of the Iliad does not depend upon his merit or dignity, but I wish, nevertheless, that Homer had chosen a hero somewhat less pettish and less fantastic: a perfect hero is chimerical and unnatural, and consequently uninstructive; but it is also true that while the epic hero ought to be drawn with the infirmities that are the lot of humanity, he ought never to be represented as extremely absurd.'

Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary, Lady Wortley Montagu      Print: Book

  

Gemelli : unknown

'But I cannot forbear takng notice to you of a mistake of Gemelli (though I honour him in a much higher degree than any other voyage-writer): he says that there are no remains of Calcedon; this is certainly a mistake.'

Unknown
Century: 1700-1799     Reader/Listener/Group: Mary, Lady Wortley Montagu      

  

George Meredith : [unknown]

'As I began to mend, the Governor, to keep me from brooding too much, gave orders that I was to have all the reading matter I wanted within the limits of the prison library, and my book changed just as often as I liked and at any hour of the day. To a man eager to improve his acquaintance with standard literature such a privilege was immeasurably great, and for the next six weeks or so I browsed among the Victorian novelists - Austin [sic?], the Brontes, Dickens, Thackeray, George Eliot, Meredith, Lytton, Kingsley, Reade, Hughes, Trollope and others.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Stuart Wood [pseud?]      Print: Book

  

John Henry Newman : Obedience, the remedy for religious perplexity

From Elizabeth Missing Sewell's Journal, 20 June 1845: 'The Meyricks have been here today. Mr. Meyrick told Edwards [Sewell's brother] there was no doubt that Newman is going over to Rome, which agrees but little with an observation made by Dr. Pusey to G. F. a short time since that no one could know how devoted a servant of the Church Newman was till after his death. The Church though may mean the Catholic or Universal Church, and so Rome may be included. It is a horrid, startling notion, but a sermon of Newman's I was reading to-night would be a great safeguard against being led into mischief by it. "Obedience, the remedy for religious perplexity."'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Missing Sewell      Print: Book

  

Harriet Martineau : Tales on the Game Laws

From Elizabeth Missing Sewell's Journal, 26 November 1846: 'I read nothing scarcely [...] Miss Martineau's [italics]Tales on the Game Laws[end italics] I began, but they are so dull to me that I have scarcely patience to finish. The thing I like about them is their fairness. The rich people are not all wretches, though Miss Martineau's sympathies are evidently with the poor.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Missing Sewell      Print: Unknown

  

Thomas Babbington Macaulay : [uknown]

Second confinement in the Prison at Hull: 'I remember how when the light began to fail of evenings, I often risked punishment by getting up to my window to finish an essay by Macaulay, whose style charmed me, or one of those vibrant, pulpitating lectures on hero-worship by Carlyle!'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Stuart Wood [pseud?]      Print: Book

  

David Hume : [unknown]

'At Maidstone, both on this occasion and subsequently when I served several months in separate confinement as a convict preparatory to going to Parkhurst, I was able, through the chaplain's kindness, to study not only Greek philosophy, but also Locke, Hume, Berkeley, Kant, Hegel, Fichte, Schelling, Schopenhauer, Fechner, Lotze, etc. Being a very rapid reader and having some ability in getting at the gist of a book I got through a fair amount of really interesting reading. ... In the summer I grabbed a book as soon as it was light enough to read, say, four o'clock, read till and during breakfast, dinner, supper and continued till 9:30 or 10 o'clock at night, an average of 8 to 10 hours a day. There were times, of course, when the burden of prison life bred a spirit of discontent and restlessness which books could not assuage.'

Century: 1900-1945     Reader/Listener/Group: Stuart Wood [pseud?]      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : Essays

'Reading - for want of something better - "Macaulay's Essays". He is a born Edinburgh Reviewer, this Macaulay; and, indeed, a type-reviewer - an authentic specimen-page of nineteenth century "literature". He has the right, omniscent tone, and air, and the true knac; of administering reverential flattery to British civilisation, British prowess, honour, enlightenment, and all that, especially to the great nineteenth century and its astounding civilisation, that is, to his readers. It is altogether a new thing in the history of mankind, this triumphant glorification of a current century upon being the century it is...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Mitchel      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : Essays [on Bacon]

'After breakfast, when the sun burned too fiercely on deck, went below, threw off coat and waistcoat for coolness, and began to read Macaulay's essay on Bacon - "the great English teacher", as the reviewer calls him. And to do the reviewer justice, he understands Bacon, knows what Bacon did, and what he did not; and therefore sets small store by that illustrious Chimera's new "method" of investigating truth...'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Mitchel      Print: Book

  

Homer : [unknown]

''4th-11th- Reading Homer and basking in the sun upon the sea side of the breakwater. Weather delicious. Have also been swallowing autobiographies - Gifford's, Thomas Elwood's, Capt. Crichton's autobiography by Dean Swift.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Mitchel      Print: Book

  

Alexandre Dumas : Three Mousequetaires

'Three weeks of sickness, sleepness nights, and dismal days: and the "light" reading that I have been devouring I find to weigh very heavy. Yet the "Three Mousquetaires" of Dumas is certainly the best novel that creature has made. How is it that the paltriest feuilletoniste in Paris can always turn out something at least readable (readable, I mean, by a person of ordinary taste and knowledge) and that the popular providers of that sort of thing in London - save only Dickens - are also so very stupid, ignorant and vicious a herd? Not but the feuilleton-men are vicious enough; but then vice wrapped decently in plenty of British cant, and brutified by cockney ignorance, is triply vicious. Dumas's "Marquis de Letoriere", too, is a pleasant enough little novelette: but I have tried twice, and tried in vain, to get through a mass of letterpress called "Windsor Castle", by Ainsworth; and another by one Douglas Jerrold, entitled "St Giles and St James".

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Mitchel      Print: Book

  

Alexandre Dumas : Marquis de Letoriere

'Three weeks of sickness, sleepness nights, and dismal days: and the "light" reading that I have been devouring I find to weigh very heavy. Yet the "Three Mousquetaires" of Dumas is certainly the best novel that creature has made. How is it that the paltriest feuilletoniste in Paris can always turn out something at least readable (readable, I mean, by a person of ordinary taste and knowledge) and that the popular providers of that sort of thing in London - save only Dickens - are also so very stupid, ignorant and vicious a herd? Not but the feuilleton-men are vicious enough; but then vice wrapped decently in plenty of British cant, and brutified by cockney ignorance, is triply vicious. Dumas's "Marquis de Letoriere", too, is a pleasant enough little novelette: but I have tried twice, and tried in vain, to get through a mass of letterpress called "Windsor Castle", by Ainsworth; and another by one Douglas Jerrold, entitled "St Giles and St James".'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Mitchel      Print: Book

  

Dr Memes [pseud?] : [Life of William Cowper]

'I have omitted, of late, to set down the titles of - for want of a better name I must call them - books, that I have been reading these past months; chiefly because they are of such utter offal that there is no use in remembering so much as their names. Madame Pichler's "Siege of Vienna" ...; a life of Walter Scott, by one Allen, advocate, ... In truth the book is very presumptuous and very stupid; yet it is far excelled in both these respects by another I am reading now, a life of Cowper, by Dr Memes (bookseller's hack literator of that name). Not that the writer is without genius; for he has succeeded in making a book as repulsive as it is possible for a book giving anything like a narrative of Cowper's life to be.'

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: John Mitchel      Print: Book

  

Thomas Babington Macaulay : History of England

'Have been reading in "Tait's Magazine" an elaborate review of a new book by the indefatigable Government literator, Macaulay - no less than a "History of England".' 'NB: Bothwell, V.D.L. 4 August 1851 - I have read the book itself here; for, having become one of the most popular books in the world, it is even in the village library of Bothwell. Mem. - It is a clever, base, ingenious, able and shallow political pamphlet in two volumes. This writer has the rare art of colouring a whole narrative by an apparently unstudied adjective or two, and telling stories of frightful falsehoods by one of the most graceful of adverbs. What is worse, the fellow believes in no human virtue - proves Penn a pimping parasite, because he hated penal laws; and makes a sort of Bromwicham hero out of the dull Dutch Deliverer'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: John Mitchel      Print: Book

  

Charles de Remusat : 'French Essays on Literature'

From Elizabeth Missing Sewell's Journal, 28 January [?1865]: 'I am reading [italics]French Essays on Literature[end italics] [sic] -- so clever they are! Charles de Remusat describes the French of the eighteenth century as "Des gens qui ne lisaient qu'afin de pouvoir parler". Could anything be more apt?'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Elizabeth Missing Sewell      Print: Book

  

Guy de Maupassant : unknown

'My favourite masters & models: 1. Turgenev, a royal first (you must read 'On the Eve'?flawless I tell you. Bring back such books of mine as you have; I have others you must read). 2. de Maupassant. 3. de Goncourts. 4. George Moore?the great author who can neither write nor spell! Stevenson only helps me in minute details of style.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Arnold Bennett      Print: Book

  

George Moore : unknown

'My favourite masters & models: 1. Turgenev, a royal first (you must read 'On the Eve'?flawless I tell you. Bring back such books of mine as you have; I have others you must read). 2. de Maupassant. 3. de Goncourts. 4. George Moore?the great author who can neither write nor spell! Stevenson only helps me in minute details of style.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Arnold Bennett      Print: Book

  

George Moore : A Modern Lover

'I couldn?t get her [?George Paston?] to give George Moore a good word. I have just been reading his first novel.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Arnold Bennett      Print: Book

  

John Milton : Paradise Lost

'Spent most of the day reading the "Paradise Lost"; I was quite delighted with it'.

Century: 1800-1849     Reader/Listener/Group: Harriet Wynne      Print: Book

  

William Forbes-Mitchell : Reminiscences of the Great Mutiny 1857-9

'I have just returned from reading a chapter of your book to my wife and her daughter. There was not a dry eye at the table, and the reader had to suspend operations, choking upon sobs. They were tears of pride and sympathy. I beg to offer you this family anecdote as a testimony to the success of your reminiscences. Of making books there is said to be no end, and I have made many. But if I could only think once, before I died, that I had given so much and such noble pleasure to a reader, I should be more than rewarded. You have made me proud and glad to be a Scotsman.'

Century: 1850-1899     Reader/Listener/Group: Robert Louis Stevenson      Print: Book

  

Homer : Illiad

'The individual...was a fellow-worker of mine for nigh two years in Dartmoor. He had, in his younger days, passed through the workhouse; read the pestilent literature of rascaldom which has educated so many criminal characters in this country; then graduated in the "School", and ultimately became a noted burglar. His reading in prison had been pretty extensive, while his intelligence would have insured him a position in society above that of a labouring man... I could not help looking upon it as a very novel experience, for even this grotesque world, to have to listen to a man who could delight in a literary discussion, quote all the choice p